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English and Modern Languages

Gordon Van Ness, Chair
Lisa Seamster, Secretary

ENGLISH PROGRAM

The English program of the Department of English and Modern Languages offers courses leading to the BA and MA degrees.

Every attempt has been made to state the major and minor requirements as clearly as possible. However, we recommend that every student majoring or minoring in the program maintain close communication with the academic advisor assigned by the department in order to plan a program suited to the student's needs.

NOTE: The department does not guarantee that all courses listed will be offered every year.

Assessment

The Department requires student outcomes assessment testing prior to graduation.

Faculty

Susan L. Booker, PhD, Assistant Professor of English
Rhonda Brock-Servais, PhD, Associate Professor of English
Don Butler, M.A., Lecturer in English
Mary Carroll-Hackett, MFA, Assistant Professor of English
Craig A. Challender, PhD, Professor of English
Martha E. Cook, PhD, Professor of English
Steven Faulkner, PhD, Assistant Professor of English
C. Hood Frazier, PhD, Professor of English
Esther Godfrey, PhD, Assistant Professor of English
Chene Heady, PhD, Assistant Professor of English
Brett Hursey, PhD, Lecturer in English
Michael C. Lund, PhD, Professor of English
Robert L. Lynch, Jr., PhD, Associate Professor of English
Chris McGee, PhD, Assistant Professor of English
Carmen Phelps, PhD, Assistant Professor of English
Shawn Smith, PhD, Assistant Professor of English
Gena Southall, EdD, Assistant Professor of English
Derek Taylor, PhD, Associate Professor of English
Larissa Tracy, PhD, Assistant Professor of English
Gordon Van Ness, PhD, Professor of English

Creative Writing

Faculty

Mary Carroll-Hackett, MFA, Assistant Professor of English
Craig Challender, PhD, Professor of English
Steven Faulkner, PhD, Assistant of English
C. Hood Frazier, PhD, Associate Professor of English
Brett Hursey, PhD, Lecturer in English

Rhetoric and Professional Writing

Faculty

Susan L. Booker, PhD, Assistant Professor of English
Don Butler, M.A., Lecturer in English

The major in English requires a minimum of 36 hours of coursework in the discipline. Graduates from the program enter a variety of careers requiring skill in communication; research; and the analysis or production of texts, including teaching, journalism, law, publishing, creative writing, technical writing, and business management. The relatively low number of required hours for the major gives students flexibility either to develop further their background in writing and literature further or to add expertise in a related field. The concentration in Creative Writing requires an additional 37 hours of coursework and a portfolio.

Majors seeking licensure for teaching secondary English should add to the major requirements ENGL 350, 381, 382, 479, and 480. In addition, they must be formally admitted to the Education Department and should therefore complete EDUC 245 and EDUC 260 and pass the Praxis 1 examination preferably during their freshman year. They also need to join a professional organization, S-LATE (Students of Longwood Association of Teachers of English). Before being admitted for student teaching, teaching candidates should complete the required education courses and all required major courses and maintain a minimum of 2.5 GPA cumulatively and in the major. Finally, students must complete before graduation the Praxis 2 examination and student teaching. Students licensed to teach secondary English can also gain endorsement to teach journalism, speech communication, theater arts, adult ESL or drivers education. (See "Add-On Endorsements" under education).

In addition to the English major, the concentrations in Rhetoric and Professional Writing and Creative Writing, and secondary licensure, the department offers a minor in English, a minor in Professional Writing, and a minor in Creative Writing.

The department offers a five-year plan for English majors who wish to obtain both the BA and the M.A. in English. There are three M.A. concentrations, one in literature (30 credit hours), one in English Education and Writing (36 credit hours), and one in Creative Writing. To complete the M.A. in one additional year, including summers, careful preparation of the student's course schedule is important; for assistance, students should consult the English Graduate Program Coordinator. Students will need to take six hours of graduate credit during the final semester of their senior year, or, for students doing an internship or student teaching that semester, during the preceding semester.

ENGLISH MAJOR, BA DEGREE

A. General Education Core Requirements. 41 credits

See General Education Requirements
The Department requires PHIL 308, 315 or 316, for the satisfaction of Goal 13.
ENGL 201, World Literature, will satisfy Goal 3 and is required for Secondary Teaching Licensure in English.

B. Additional Degree Requirements. 6 credits.

See Additional Degree Requirements for Bachelor of Arts

C. Major Requirements. 36 credits.

ENGL 321 British Literature I/3 credits
ENGL 322 British Literature II/3 credits
ENGL 323 British Literature III/3 credits
ENGL 324 British Literature IV/3 credits
ENGL 331 American Literature to 1865/3 credits
ENGL 332 American Literature 1865-1920/3 credits
ENGL 333 American Literature Since 1920/3 credits
Three 400-level courses (ENGL 411-452, 470, 490, 495, 498) plus ENGL 461, Literary Criticism: Senior Seminar/ 12 credits.
Three elective credits. May be satisfied with any 300-400 level English course/3 credits.
(Note: Students in the Creative Writing concentration should choose from the following to satisfy these three elective credits: ENGL 350 Linguistics/3 credits or ENGL 382 Traditional and Modern Grammar/3 credits
(Additional Note: Students in the Creative Writing concentration who also desire secondary licensure should contact the English Education director at the beginning of their program for additional requirements and help scheduling credits.)
A minimum of one hour from ONE of the following:
(satisfies General Education Goal 15)
EDUC 370 Practicum I /1 credit
ENGL 482 Directed Teaching in the Secondary Classroom/ 1 credit
ENGL 490 Independent Study/ 1 credit
ENGL 492 Internship/ 1 credit
ENGL 498 Honors Research in English/ 1 credit

D. Secondary Teaching Licensure, grades 6-12. 50-53 credits.

Additional requirements for English:
ENGL 201 World Literature/3 credits (will satisfy General Education Goal 3)
ENGL 350 Linguistics/3 credits
ENGL 381 Literature for Young Adults/3 credits
ENGL 382 Traditional and Modern Grammar/3 credits
ENGL 479 Writing: Theory and Practice for the
Middle, Secondary, and College Classroom/ 3 credits
ENGL 480 The Teaching of English/3 credits
For endorsements to teach Journalism, Theatre, Economics, Geography, History or Political Science (see minors in these fields).
(Note: Additional educational requirements for English 6-12 licensure, see page 65.)

E. General Electives for BA in English - 37

F. Creative Writing Concentration Requirements -- 37 credit hours and a Senior Portfolio

Required Professional Courses for all CW tracks: (4 credits)
Required: ENGL 485 Practical Issues for the Working Writer/1 credit
Choose one of the following:
ENGL 479 Writing: Theory and Practice for the Middle, Secondary, and College Classroom/3 credits
ENGL 470 Professional Writing/3 credits
Literature Core Requirements: 15 credit hours (5 courses)
Choose four courses from the following:
(Notes: At least two courses must be at the 400 level or above. Additionally, at least one course should include substantial works from outside the student's primary genre.)
ENGL 356 The Art of Film I/3 credits
ENGL 357 The Art of Film II/3 credits
ENGL 358 Women and Film/3 credits
ENGL 360 Genre Studies/3 credits
ENGL 361 Literature of Places and Spaces/3 credits
ENGL 380 Children's Literature/3 credits
ENGL 381 Literature for Young Adults/3 credits
ENGL 362 Literature of Diversity/3 credits
ENGL 412 Poetry/3 credits
ENGL 414 The Short Story/3 credits
ENGL 415 Drama/3 credits
ENGL 431 Women and Literature/3 credits
ENGL 442 Regional Literature/3 credits
ENGL 443 Postcolonial Literature/3 credits
ENGL 444 Literature and Culture/3 credits
Choose one of the following:
ENGL 411 Epic/3 credits
ENGL 413 The Novel/3 credits
ENGL 421, 422 Major Figures in Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 423, 424 Major Figures in Poetry/3 credits
ENGL 425 Shakespeare/3 credits
ENGL 431 Arthurian Literature/3 credits
ENGL 445 Studies in Children's Literature/3 credits
ENGL 451 Continental Literature I/3 credits
ENGL 452 Continental Literature II/3 credits
Writing Core Requirements: 18 credit hours (6 workshop courses)

NOTES:

All writing core courses must be workshop courses. One introductory course must be in the primary genre; at least two additional introductory workshops should be in disparate genres, e.g. fiction writers should take a non-prose course, preferably poetry or dramatic writing, rather than creative nonfiction.

Prerequisite: The introductory workshop in a specific genre must be completed for entrance into the advanced level workshop.

One advanced workshop outside the student's primary genre is required.

The advanced workshop in the primary genre may be repeated once for credit.

Choose from the following tracks:

Poetry Track
Required Core Courses: (6-9 credit hours)
ENGL 317 Writing Poetry/3 credits
ENGL 477 Advanced Poetry Writing (may be repeated once for credit)/3-6 credits
Choose from the following, including at least one advanced workshop (9-12 credits):
ENGL 316 Writing Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 318 Writing Non-Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 315 Introduction to Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 476 Advanced Fiction Writing/3 credits
ENGL 478 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing/3 credits
ENGL 475 Advanced Dramatic Writing/3 credits

Fiction Track
Required Core Courses: (6-9 credit hours)
ENGL 316 Writing Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 476 Advanced Fiction Writing (may be repeated once for credit)/3-6 credits
Choose from the following, including at least one advanced workshop (9-12 credits):
ENGL 317 Writing Poetry/3 credits
ENGL 315 Introduction to Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 318 Writing Non-Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 477 Advanced Poetry Writing/3 credits
ENGL 475 Advanced Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 478 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing/3 credits

Creative Nonfiction Track
Required Core Courses: (6-9 credit hours)
ENGL 318 Writing Non-Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 478 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing (may be repeated once for credit)/3-6 credits
Choose from the following, including at least one advanced workshop (9-12 credits):
ENGL 317 Writing Poetry/3 credits
ENGL 315 Introduction to Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 316 Writing Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 477 Advanced Poetry Writing/3 credits
ENGL 475 Advanced Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 476 Advanced Fiction Writing/3 credits

Dramatic Writing Track
Required Core Courses: (6-9 credit hours)
ENGL 315 Introduction to Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 475 Advanced Dramatic Writing (may be repeated once for credit)/3-6 credits
Choose from the following, including at least one advanced workshop (9-12 credits):
ENGL 316 Writing Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 318 Writing Non-Fiction
ENGL 317 Writing Poetry
ENGL 476 Advanced Fiction Writing
ENGL 478 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing/3 credits
ENGL 477 Advanced Poetry Writing/3 credits

Concentration Portfolio: Students must submit a final portfolio before official completion of the concentration will be granted. Specific requirements for the portfolio are as follows:

Portfolio Contents:

A. Examples of the student's beginning body of work from workshop courses: two in primary genre, one in another genre. One piece from primary genre should include drafts, illustrating process and revision practices.

B. A personal narrative examining their own "writing and reading life."

Portfolio Length Requirements: Poetry--20 pages; Prose--30 pages; Combination of Poetry and Prose--25 pages; Play or Screenplay--40 pages; Combination of Drama and Poetry--30 pages; Combination of Drama and Prose--40 pages

Portfolio Narrative Requirements: Five double-spaced pages addressing (1) how their reading life led them to writing; (2) writers the student considers to have had an impact on their own work and how, (3) elements of their writing that have improved through their reading and writing, including specific craft examples; (4) elements of their writing that provide the most challenge and how they go about revising to address these elements, and (5) what, if any, plans they have to continue their writing life.

Portfolio completion: Student will submit three copies of a completed portfolio to the Director of Creative Writing, who will then pass copies on to be read and approved by a minimum of three departmental faculty members. Two of these readers will be assigned members of the Creative Writing faculty, while the third--chosen by the student--may be from any concentration in the department. With signatures from at least two of the three readers, the portfolio will be considered approved and the concentration completed.

G. Rhetoric and Professional Writing Concentration Requirements -- 24-27 credits.

ENGL 210 Introduction to Journalism/3 credits
ENGL 301 Rhetorical Criticism/3 credits
ENGL 302 History of Rhetoric/3 credits
ENGL 318 Creative Writing Non-Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 319 Technical Writing/3 credits
ENGL 350 Introduction to Linguistics/3 credits
ENGL 470 Professional Writing and Edition/3 credits
ENGL 492 Internship in Rhetoric/Professional Writing/3 credits

H. Total Credits Required for BA in English - 120

Total Credits Required for BA in English/Creative Writing Concentration - 120
Total Credits Required for BA in English with Secondary Teaching Endorsement - 130-133
Concentration in Rhetoric and Professional Writing - 24-27

MINORS

Minor in English (18 credits)

Choose one of the following:
ENGL 321 British Literature I/3 credits
ENGL 322 British Literature II/3 credits
ENGL 331 American Literature to 1865/3 credits
Choose one of the following:
ENGL 323 British Literature III/3 credits
ENGL 324 British Literature IV/3 credits
ENGL 332 American Literature 1865-1920/3 credits
ENGL 333 American Literature Since 1920/3 credits
One 400-level course/3 credits
English electives, 200-level* and above/9 credits

*Note: ENGL 201, 202, and 203 are designed to fulfill General Education Goal 3. These courses may not be used as English electives for the English minor or to fulfill degree requirements for Humanities courses.

Minor in Professional Writing (18 credits)

ENGL 210 Introduction to Journalism/3 credits
ENGL 318 Writing Non-Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 319 Technical Writing/3 credits
ENGL 350 Linguistics/3 credits
ENGL 470 Professional Writing and Editing/3 credits
Journalism and Professional Writing electives/6 credits must be selected from the following:
ART 221 Graphic Design I/3 credits
ENGL 316 Writing Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 317 Writing Poetry/3 credits
ENGL 382 Traditional and Modern English Grammar/3 credits
ENGL 478 Advanced Creative Writing Non-Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 492 Internship in Professional Writing/3 credits
TOTAL 18 credits

Minor in Creative Writing

Literature Core Requirements
ENGL 324 British Literature IV/3 credits
ENGL 333 American Literature since 1920/3 credits
Literature elective/ 3 credits must be selected from the following:
ENGL 356 The Art of Film I/3 credits
ENGL 357 The Art of Film II/3 credits
ENGL 358 Women and Film/3 credits
ENGL 360 Genre Studies/3 credits
ENGL 361 Literature of Places and Spaces/3 credits
ENGL 380 Children's Literature/3 credits
ENGL 362 Literature of Diversity/3 credits
ENGL 412 Poetry/3 credits
ENGL 414 The Short Story/3 credits
ENGL 415 Drama/3 credits
ENGL 431 Women and Literature/3 credits
ENGL 442 Regional Literature/3 credits
ENGL 443 Postcolonial Literature/3 credits
ENGL 444 Literature and Culture/3 credits

Writing Core Requirements
6 credit hours (2 courses) in introductory level workshops

Note: All writing core courses must be workshop courses. One introductory course must be in the primary genre; the additional introductory workshop should be in a disparate genre, e.g. fiction writers should take a non-prose course--preferably poetry or dramatic writing, rather than creative nonfiction.

Choose from the following tracks:

Poetry Track
Required Core Courses:
ENGL 317 Writing Poetry/3 credits
ENGL 477 Advanced Poetry Writing/3 credits
Choose one of the following:
ENGL 315 Introduction to Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 316 Writing Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 318 Writing Non-Fiction/3 credits

Fiction Track
Required Core Courses:
ENGL 316 Writing Fiction/ 3 credits
ENGL 476 Advanced Fiction Writing/ 3 credits
Choose one of the following:
ENGL 315 Introduction to Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 317 Writing Poetry/3 credits

Creative Nonfiction Track
Required Core Courses:
ENGL 318 Writing Non-Fiction/3 credits
ENGL 478 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing/3 credits
Choose one of the following:
ENGL 315 Introduction to Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 317 Writing Poetry/3 credits

Dramatic Writing Track
Required Core Courses:
ENGL 315 Introduction to Dramatic Writing/3 credits
ENGL 475 Advanced Dramatic Writing/3 credits
Choose one of the following:
ENGL 316 Writing Fiction
ENGL 317 Writing Poetry
ENGL 318 Writing Non-Fiction

Required Course for all Tracks:
ENGL 485 Practical Issues for the Working Writer/1 credit

Minor Portfolio: Students must submit a final portfolio before official completion of the minor will be granted. Specific requirements for the portfolio are as follows:
Portfolio Contents:

A. Examples of the student's beginning body of work from workshop courses: two in primary genre, one in another genre. One piece from primary genre should include drafts, illustrating process and revision practices.

B. A personal narrative examining their own "writing and reading life."

Portfolio Length Requirements:

Poetry--10 pages; Prose--25 pages; Combination of Poetry and Prose--20 pages; Play or Screenplay--30 pages; Combination of Poetry and Drama--20 pages; Combination of Prose and Drama--25 pages

Portfolio Narrative Requirements:

Three double-spaced pages addressing (1) writers the student considers to have impacted their work, (2) elements of their writing that have improved over course of study, (3) elements of their writing that provide the most challenge and how they go about revising to address these elements, and (4) what, if any, plans they have to continue their writing.

Portfolio completion: Student will submit three copies of a completed portfolio to the Director of Creative Writing, who will then pass copies on to be read and approved by a minimum of three departmental faculty members. Two of these readers will be assigned members of the Creative Writing faculty, while the third--chosen by the student--may be from any concentration in the department. With signatures from at least two of the three readers, the portfolio will be considered approved and the minor completed.

TOTAL 19 credits and the portfolio

ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Note: ENGL 150, which satisfies Goal Two of the General Education requirements, is prerequisite to all other English courses.
General Education Courses *
Writing Intensive Course **
Speaking Intensive Course ***

English 150. Writing and Research. Writing and reading for a variety of academic purposes including in-depth research. Oral presentation required. Prerequisite to all other English courses. 3 credits. *

English 201. World Literature. A theme-centered study of selected movements and traditions (exclusive of United States and British literature) by major world writers such as Homer, the author of Gilgamesh, Murasaki, Li Po, Cervantes, Molière, Goethe, Tolstoy, Garcia Marquez, Soyinka, Mahfouz, Rushdie, and Duras. May not be used to satisfy the Humanities requirement for the BA, BM, or BFA degree. Prerequisite: ENGL 150. 3 credits. *

English 202. British Literature. A theme-centered study of significant movements and traditions in fiction and poetry by major British authors such as the author of Beowulf, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Keats, Austen, George Eliot, Tennyson, and Yeats. May not be used to satisfy the Humanities requirement for the BA, BM, or BFA. Prerequisite: ENGL 150.  3 credits. *

English 203. American Literature. A theme-centered study of significant movements and tradi-tions in fiction and poetry by major United States authors such as Bradstreet, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Dickinson, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hughes, Eliot, and Morrison. May not be used to satisfy the Humanities requirement for the BA, BM, or BFA Prerequisite: ENGL 150.  3 credits.*

English 210. Introduction to Journalism. Fundamentals of newswriting and reporting for the student press. 3 credits. **

English 292. Internship in English. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of English. 1-18 credits.

English 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in English. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

English 301. Rhetorical Criticism.  Fundamental principles of rhetorical study.  Emphases on approaches to analyzing non-literary tests using various rhetorical theoreticals approaches. Prerequisite: ENGL 150. 3 credits.**

English 302. History of Rhetoric.  A history of the major figures, texts, and rhetorical movements from Gorgias to the 20th century.  Prerequisite: ENGL 150. 3 credits. **

English 311, 312. Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad. 1-16 credits per semester.

Writing Courses

English 315. Introduction to Dramatic Writing.. Writing the screenplay, play, and other forms of drama. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 316. Writing Fiction. The short story and other forms of fiction. 3 credits.

English 317. Writing Poetry. Traditional and contemporary techniques in poetry. 3 credits.

English 318. Writing Non-Fiction. Narrative nonfiction, article and feature writing, and other forms of literary journalism. 3 credits. **

English 319. Technical Writing. A study and application of writing techniques for the dissemination of scientific and technical information. 3 credits. **

Courses in the Major Literary Periods

Note: These courses are designed primarily for English majors and minors.

English 321. British Literature I. Middle Ages and Renaissance, with emphasis on such major works and writers as Beowulf, Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Milton. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 322. British Literature II. The Restoration through the age of Johnson, with emphasis on such major writers as Dryden, Behn, Swift, Pope, Defoe, Richardson, and Johnson. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 323. British Literature III. The Romantic and Victorian ages, with emphasis on such poets as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Tennyson, and Browning and such prose writers as Carlyle, Dickens, and Eliot. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 324. British Literature IV. The twentieth century. Emphasis on such major writers as Hardy, Yeats, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, and Lessing. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 331. American Literature To 1865. The beginnings through the period of the Civil War, with emphasis on such writers as Bradstreet, Franklin, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Douglass, and Whitman. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 332. American Literature 1865-1920. The age of realism and naturalism with emphasis on such major writers as Dickinson, Twain, James, Dreiser, Crane, Chopin, Chesnutt, and Wharton. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 333. American Literature Since 1920. The modern age with emphasis on such major writers as Eliot, Frost, Cather, Hemingway, Hughes, Faulkner, Wright, Rich, and Morrison. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

Other 300-level courses

English 350. Introduction to Linguistics. An overview of structural, cognitive, social, and historical dimensions of language. Applies techniques of language analysis to a variety of language uses. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 356. The Art of Film I. Introduction to theory and techniques of the motion picture through screenings of classic and contemporary feature films. 3 credits.

English 357. The Art of Film II. A study of major directors of film genres. 3 credits.

English 358. Women and Film. A study of women directors and the history and conventions of portraying women in film. Prerequisites: ENGL 150. 3 credits.

English 360. Genre Studies. Study of literature in the context of a genre such as, but not limited to, the following: Humor, Mythology, Folk Literature, Detective Fiction, Science Fiction, Lyric Poetry, The Sonnet, Narrative Non-Fiction. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 361. Literature of Places and Spaces. Study of literature that is shaped by its setting or place of origin. Could include, but not limited to, the literature of Ireland, West Africa, the American West. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 362. Literature of Diversity. Study of literature that represent the rich variety of people and beliefs in our world. Could include, but is not limited to, any British, American, or other ethnic literatures; queer studies; postcolonial literature, the Bible as literature. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 365. Shakespeare.  An introductory study of Shakespeare's works.  Prerequisite:  completion of General Education Goal 3.  3 credits.

English 380. Children's Literature. A survey of poetry, prose, and other media appropriate for elementary students. Primarily for those preparing for careers in elementary education and library science. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 381. Literature for Young Adults. A survey of young adult literature from 1967 to the present. Selection and evaluation of books, poetry, short stories, and other media. Instruction in and practice with response theory using written assignments and oral presentations. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 382. Traditional and Modern English Grammar. A brief consideration of the history of the English language and a detailed study of English sentence structure, using the perspectives of traditional, structural, and transformational-generative grammar. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 3 credits.

English 390. Directed Study or Independent Study. Must be approved by the head of the department. May be repeated as 391. 1-18 credits.

English 392. Internship in English. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of English. 1-18 credits.

English 395. Special Topics. Selected topics in English. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. Prerequisite: completion of General Education Goal 3. 1-3 credits.

English 400. Active Citizenship: An Advanced Writing Seminar. Develops rhetorical skills needed for citizenship in a democracy. Includes interdisciplinary inquiry into and analysis of at least one significant public issue across all sections. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of Goals 2 and 3; 75 credit hours or permission of the Chair of the General Education Committee. 3 credits. *

Genre Courses

Prerequisite: completion of Goal 3 of the General Education requirements, and either one 300-level course in a literary period, or permission of the instructor.

English 411. Epic. Study in the tradition and qualities of the epic as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 412. Poetry. Study in the tradition and qualities of poetry as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more specific forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 413. The Novel. Study in the tradition and qualities of the novel as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 414. Short Story. Study in the tradition and qualities of the short story as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 415. Drama. Study in the tradition and qualities of drama as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 421, 422. Major Figures in Fiction. Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American writers. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 423, 424. Major Figures in Poetry. Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American writers. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 425. Shakespeare. Extended study of specific themes and topics in Shakespeare's works.  Topics may include, but will not be limited to:  studies of a specific genre (comedy, tragedy, history), studies of Shakespeare's Roman plays or history plays, or studies in Shakespearean stage on film history. 3 credits. ** and ***

Other 400-level courses

Prerequisites: Completion of Goal 3 of the General Education requirements, and either one 300-level course in a literary period, or permission of the instructor.

English 431. Arthurian Literature. Comparative study of Arthurian material of various countries from the medieval through the modern periods. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 432. Women and Literature. Comparative study of the tradition of literature by and about women. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 441. Ethnic Literature. Comparative study of the literary tradition of an ethnic group such as Afro-American, Jewish, Chicano, or Native American peoples. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 442. Regional Literature. Comparative study of the literary tradition of a region, such as the American South, or Ireland. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 443. Postcolonial Literature. Study of literature written in English from countries during and after colonial contact with Britain, excluding the United States. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 444. Literature and Culture. Extended study of British or American literature and culture at a particular point in time or of a literary theme over time. Emphasis on the relationship of literature to its cultural context, including politics, social organization, art, and music. Prerequisite: Completion of Goal 3 of the General Education requirements, and either one 300-level course in a literary period, or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ***

English 445. Studies in Children's Literature. Advanced study featuring a particular aspect of Children's Literature, such as a time period, a genre, or a theoretical perspective. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 451. Continental Literature I. Study of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance European classics in translation. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 452. Continental Literature II. Study of European literature of the neo-classical, romantic, and modern periods in translation. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 461. Literary Criticism: Senior Seminar. Study of the history and aims of literary criticism from Plato and Aristotle to the present, including oral and written criticism of literary works. Capstone course for English majors. Enrollment limited to seniors and those with permission of instructor. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 470. Professional Writing Skills. Intensive reading and writing workshop focused on developing professional expository prose within the student's field of endeavor. The last half of the course will be devoted to writing workshops critiquing "works" in progress of some "real world" writing project. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 475. Advanced Dramatic Writing. An advanced workshop in writing forms of drama. Prerequisite: ENGL 315: Introduction to Dramatic Writing with a grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

English 476. Advanced Fiction Writing. An advanced workshop in writing the short story. Prerequisite: ENGL 316: Writing Fiction with a grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

English 477. Advanced Poetry Writing. An advanced workshop in writing poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 317: Writing Poetry with a grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

English 478. Advanced Creative Non-Fiction Writing. An advanced workshop in writing various forms of creative non-fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 318: Writing Non-Fiction with a grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

English 479. Writing: Theory and Practice for the Middle, Secondary, and College Classroom. A study of theories and strategies for improving writing. Includes a discussion of analyzing subject matter, determining purpose and audience, drafting, revising, editing (including using correct mechanics), and evaluating the elements of effective writing instruction at the middle, secondary, and college levels. This course will also contain a field-based component in a classroom setting when students will examine current pedagogical practices in the teaching of writing. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 480. The Teaching of English. A study of current practices with emphasis on specific techniques and materials. 3 credits. ** and ***

English 482. Directed Teaching in the Secondary Classroom. Required of all students seeking Secondary Teaching Licensure in English. Each student is assigned to work with a qualified cooperating teacher in a selected school setting off-campus. The student teacher goes to the school setting and follows the schedule of the cooperating teacher(s) for a ten to eleven week period. This schedule involves a minimum teaching day of six hours for five days each week for ten/eleven weeks (300 hours total). Prerequisite: Completion of all methods courses with ENGL 479 and 480 having been taken within two years of student teaching. All educational requirements on page 65 must be completed before candidate can register for student teaching.  Minimum cumulative and major GPA of 2.50. 11 credits. ***

English 483. Writing: Theory and Practice for the Elementary Classroom. A study of theory and practice relating to writers at emergent, early, and developing stages. Includes discussion of the complex factors involved in literacy acquisition at the elementary level, along with exploration of effective ways to address these factors through writing instruction. Also includes extensive experience with writing: processes, strategies, and evaluation. 3 credits.** and ***

English 484. Evaluating and Tutoring Writing. Instruction in diagnosing and evaluating writing, and practice in giving individualized instruction in writing through the Writing Center. May be repeated twice for credit. 1 credit. 

English 485. practical issues for the Working Writer. An introduction to practical issues beginning writers face, including but not limited to manuscript preparation, researching journals and markets, preparation for and giving public readings, and imaginative ways to deal with rejection. Prerequisite: ENGL 315 or 316 or 317 or 318, with a grade of C or higher. 1 credit.

English 490. Independent Study. A directed reading and/or research program administered by qualified specialists in the department. One option is to do an extended research project in conjunction with a 300- or 400-level English course for an additional one-hour credit. The student must secure the director's approval prior to registering for the course. 1-3 credits per semester.

English 490. Independent Study. A directed reading and/or research program administered by qualified specialists in the department. One option is to do an extended research project in conjunction with a 300- or 400-level English course for an additional one-hour credit. The student must secure the director's approval prior to registering for the course. 1-3 credits per semester.

English 492. Internship in English. Directed practicum in an applied setting that permits supervised experiential learning. Students perform meaningful tasks related to the discipline in professional environments, such as publishing and journalism on and off campus. The student will complete a practicum agreement established with the department chair, department adviser, and work supervisor. 1-6 credits.

English 495. Special Topics. Selected topics in English. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits. ***

English 498. Honors Research in English. Students conduct research in English under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits.

MODERN LANGUAGES PROGRAM

The Modern Languages program offers courses in French, German, and Spanish. The major in Modern Languages requires a concentration in one of these three languages (30 or 33 hours beyond 202) and a second modern language (3 hours at the 202-level or above). No grade below C in the language of the concentration is accepted for graduation requirements for the major or minor in that language.

Students preparing to teach must take 33-36 semester hours of modern foreign language, including courses in advanced grammar and composition, conversation, culture and civilization, literature, applied linguistics, and methods. Students meeting endorsement requirements will be certified to teach a modern language at all levels from Pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade. Second language endorsement requires 24 semester hours (at least 12 of which must be beyond intermediate level). Advanced placement reduces proportionately the number of hours required by the Commonwealth of Virginia for endorsement. Majors must have a 2.50 GPA, both cumulatively and in the major, prior to student teaching.

Modern Language majors are required to complete at least one regular semester in a Longwood-approved study abroad program. Students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 to be eligible for study abroad. Longwood sponsors regular semester study abroad programs with the University of Salzburg in Austria, with Heidelberg College at the University of Heidelberg in Germany, with the VENUSA program in Merida, Venezuela, and with the Institute of Spanish Studies in Valencia, Spain. Longwood also offers regular semester abroad programs sponsored by the Council on International Educational Exchange at various universities in France. Summer programs are available in France, Spain, Venezuela, and with the University of the Antilles in Martinique.

Supporting courses are recommended in the other humanities. Greek, Latin, and Russian may be taken at Hampden-Sydney College.

ASSESSMENT

The Department requires student outcomes assessment testing prior to graduation.

FRENCH

Faculty

B. McRae Amoss, PhD, Professor of French
Raymond Cormier, PhD, Visiting Professor of French
Wade Edwards, PhD, Assistant Professor of French
Catherine Kapi, PhD, Lecturer in French

The French concentration of the Modern Language major requires the completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours in French beyond FREN 202 and the completion of a minimum of three credit hours of work in a second language at the 202-level or higher. Students are required to complete the equivalent of one semester study abroad in a Longwood-approved program, such as affiliate programs in France sponsored by the Council on International Educational Exchange.

GERMAN

Faculty

Geoffrey C. Orth, PhD, Professor of German
John F. Reynolds, PhD, Professor of Modern Languages

The German concentration of the Modern Language major requires the completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours in German beyond GERM 202 and the completion of a minimum of three credit hours of work in a second language at the 202-level or higher. Students are required to complete the equivalent of one semester study abroad in a Longwood-approved program, such as the Longwood affiliate programs at the University of Salzburg and with Heidelberg College at the University of Heidelberg.

SPANISH

Faculty

Donna Brown, M.A., Lecturer in Spanish
Ruth Budd, PhD, Associate Professor of Spanish
Javier Fernandez, PhD, Assistant Professor of Spanish
Lily Anne Goetz, PhD, Professor of Spanish
Susan Hildebrandt, PhD, Assistant Professor of Spanish
Laura Sánchez, M.A., Lecturer in Spanish

The Spanish concentration of the Modern Language major requires the completion of a minimum of 33 credit hours of work beyond SPAN 202 and the completion of three credit hours of work in a second language at the 202-level or higher. Students are required to complete the equivalent of one semester study abroad in a Longwood-approved program, such as the affiliate program in Valencia, Spain at the Institute of Spanish Studies or with the VENUSA program in Merida, Venezuela.

MODERN LANGUAGES MAJOR, BA DEGREE

A. General Education Core Requirements. 41 credits

See General Education Requirements

The Department requires PHIL 308, 315, or 316 for satisfaction of Goal 13.

B. Additional Degree Requirements. 6 credits

See Degree Requirements for Bachelor of Arts degree

C. Major Requirements.

FRENCH CONCENTRATION/29 credits
Successful completion of Longwood-approved study abroad program
FREN 330 Civilization and Culture/3 credits
FREN 341 A Survey of French Literature I: The Middle Ages Through the Enlightenment/3 credits
FREN 342 Survey of French Literature II: Romanticism Through the New Novel/3 credits
FREN 401 Advanced Grammar/3 credits
FREN 402 Advanced Conversation and Phonetics/ 3 credits
One 400-level literature course/ 3 credits
FREN 461 Senior Seminar: Literature in Cultural/Historical Context/2 credits
FREN 490 Directed Study /1 credit (satisfies General Education Goal 15)
French electives numbered 300 and above/ 9 credits
GERMAN CONCENTRATION/29 credits
Successful completion of Longwood-approved study abroad program
GERM 330 Civilization and Culture/3 credits
GERM 341 Survey of German Literature I: The Age of Goethe/3 credits
GERM 342 Survey of German Literature II: Realism to the Present/3 credits
GERM 401 Advanced Grammar and Composition/3 credits
GERM 402 Advanced Conversation and Phonetics/3 credits
One 400-level literature course/ 3 credits
GERM 461 Senior Seminar: Literature in Cultural/Historical Context/2 credits
GERM 490 Directed Study/ 1 credit (satisfies General Education Goal 15)
German electives numbered 300 and above/ 9 credits
SPANISH CONCENTRATION/32 credits
Successful completion of Longwood-approved study abroad program
SPAN 320 Advanced Spanish/3 credits
SPAN 330 Spanish Civilization and Culture/3 credits
SPAN 331 Latin American Civilization and Culture/3 credits
SPAN 341 Survey of Spanish Literature I: Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque/3 credits
SPAN 342 Survey of Spanish Literature II: Neoclassicism to the Present/ 3 credits or
SPAN 351 Survey of Spanish American Literature I: The Age of Discovery and the Colonial Period/3 credits
SPAN 352 Survey of Spanish American Literature II: The Era of Independence to the
Present/3 credits
SPAN 401 Advanced Grammar and Composition/3 credits
SPAN 402 Advanced Conversation and Phonetics/3 credits
One 400-level literature course/ 3 credits
SPAN 461 Senior Seminar: Literature in Cultural/Historical Context/2 credits
SPAN 490 Directed Study/ 1 credit (satisfies General Education Goal 15)
Spanish electives numbered 300 and above/ 3 credits

D. Pre K-12 Teaching Endorsement. 37-40 credits.

(Students will have three field experiences - EDUC 265, 370, and FREN/GERM/SPAN 482. In accordance with state licensure regulations, these experiences must include settings at the elementary or middle school settings, and at the secondary level. Each student must make appropriate arrangements with Coordinator of Student Teaching and Field Services in the Department of Education to ensure that this requirement is met.)
FRENCH CONCENTRATION/40 credits
FREN 320 Advanced French/3 credits
FREN 400 Approaches to Teaching French/3 credits
EDUC 245 Human Growth and Development/3 credits
EDUC 260 Introduction to Teaching/2 credits
EDUC 265 Education Practicum I/3 credits
EDUC 370 Practicum II/3 credit
EDUC 380 Classroom Assessment/2 credits
EDUC 430 Reading in Content Area/2 credits
EDUC 484 Media and Technology/1 credit
EDUC 487 Classroom Management and System Issues/3 credits
EDUC 489 Survey of Exceptional Children/3 credits

Professional Semester:
FREN 482 Directed Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary French Classroom/11 credits
EDUC 488 Education Seminar/1 credit
GERMAN CONCENTRATION/40 credits
GERM 320 Advanced German/3 credits
GERM 400 Approaches to Teaching German/3 credits
EDUC 245 Human Growth and Development/3 credits
EDUC 260 Introduction to Teaching/2 credits
EDUC 265 Education Practicum I/3 credits
EDUC 370 Practicum II/3 credits
EDUC 380 Classroom Assessment/2 credits
EDUC 430 Reading in the Content Area/2 credits
EDUC 484 Media and Technology/1 credit
EDUC 487 Classroom Management and System Issues/3 credits
EDUC 489 Survey of Exceptional Children/3 credits
Professional semester:
GERM 482 Directed Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary German Classroom/11 credits
EDUC 488 Education Seminar/1 credit
SPANISH CONCENTRATION/37 credits
SPAN 400 Approaches to Teaching Spanish/3 credits
EDUC 245 Human Growth and Development/3 credits
EDUC 260 Introduction to the Teaching Profession/2 credits
EDUC 265 Education Practicum I/3 credits
EDUC 370 Practicum II/3 credits
EDUC 380 Classroom Assessment/2 credits
EDUC 430 Reading in the Content Area/2 credits
EDUC 484 Media and Technology/1 credit
EDUC 487 Classroom Management and System Issues/3 credits
EDUC 489 Survey of Exceptional Children/3 credits
Professional semester:
SPAN 482 Directed Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary Spanish Classroom/11 credits
EDUC 488 Education Seminar/1 credit

E. General Electives for BA degree - 41-44 credits

General Electives for BA Degree with Pre K-12 Teaching Endorsement - 4

F. Total Credits Required for BA in Modern Languages - 120 

MINOR IN FRENCH, GERMAN, or SPANISH

The minor in French, German, or Spanish requires 18 hours of concentration at the 200 level or above, to include:

French Minor
FREN 330 Civilization and Culture/3 credits
FREN 341 A Survey of French Literature I: The Middle Ages Through the Enlightenment/3 credits or
FREN 342 A Survey of French Literature II: Romanticism Through the New Novel/3 credits
French Electives/12 credits

German Minor
GERM 330 Civilization and Culture/3 credits
GERM 341 Survey of German Literature I: The Age of Goethe/3 credits
or GERM 342 Survey of German Literature II: Realism to the Present/3 credits
German Electives/12 credits

Spanish Minor
SPAN 330 Spanish Civilization and Culture/3 credits
SPAN 331 Latin American Civilization and Culture/3 credits
Choose one of the following:
SPAN 341 Survey of Spanish Literature I: Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque/3 credits
SPAN 342 Survey of Spanish Literature II: Neoclassicism to the Present/3 credits
Choose one of the following:
SPAN 351 Survey of Spanish American Literature I: The Age of Discovery and the Colonial Period/3 credits
SPAN 352 Survey of Spanish American Literature II: The Era of Independence to the Present/3 credits
Spanish Electives/6 credits

Greek, Latin, and Russian may be available at Hampden-Sydney College.

FRENCH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

General Education Course *
Writing Intensive Course **
Speaking Intensive Course ***

NOTE: FREN 101-202 constitute a sequence of courses. A student who has successfully completed a course in the sequence may not subsequently receive credit for any course that comes earlier in the sequence. A student who has successfully completed a course numbered 300 or higher may not take a 100 or 200 level course for credit. Students who have successfully completed more than two years of high-school French may not take FREN 101 for credit. Students who have completed more than two years of French, but who desire a stronger foundation of basic elements are encouraged to enroll in FREN 105.

French 101. Elementary I. Development of basic oral expression, listening and reading comprehension, and writing. Prerequisite: No previous formal instruction in French, or a limited amount of previous formal instruction in French. Followed by FREN 102. Three classes, one practical reinforcement session, and language lab work; 4 credits.

French 102. Elementary II. The skills of speaking, listening and reading comprehension, and writing are further developed. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or an appropriate placement test score. Followed by FREN 201. Three classes, one practical reinforcement session and language lab work; 4 credits.

French 105. Intensive French I - II. Development of basic oral expression, listening and reading comprehension, and writing, for students with a limited amount of previous formal instruction in French.  Prerequisite: one or two years of high school French or other formal instruction not to exceed three years.  Followed by FREN 201.  Five classes and language lab work; 5 credits.

French 201. Intermediate I. A course designed to help students develop skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing in French, and apply these skills in a context that recognizes and explores the particularities of French and Francophone culture. Prerequisite: FREN 102 or an appropriate placement test score. Followed by FREN 202. 3 credits.* 

French 202. Intermediate II. Students will continue to develop the skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing at a higher level, integrating a wide variety of topics and materials from the target culture. Prerequisite: FREN 201 or appropriate placement test score. Successful completion of this course satisfies the foreign language requirement for the BA degree and is prerequisite for upper-level courses. 3 credits.

French 292. Internship in French. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of French. 1-18 credits.

French 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in French. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. Prerequisite FREN 202. 1-3 credits. Does not satisfy requirement for BA degree.

French 311, 312. French Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses on French language, civilization, or culture. 1-16 credits per semester.

French 320. Advanced French. Development of increased proficiency in all linguistic skills and a more extensive acquaintance with French and Francophone culture. This course will prepare students for more advanced culture and literature courses, but will also prepare students to use French to communicate effectively and to function in a foreign community. Prerequisite: FREN 202 or appropriate placement test score. Successful completion of this course is recommended before students take upper-level courses. 3 credits. 

French 330. Civilization and Culture. A study of French civilization and culture with emphasis on social institutions of the current century. Prerequisite: FREN 202. 3 credits. ***

French 335. French Cinema. An introduction to cinema in French focusing on one of any number of particular topics within the broader subject.  Topics may include the history of French cinema, great directors, films treating a specific subject matter (love, war, family), films and literature, films and history, a particular director (Renoir, Truffaut, Godard), or a group of directors (le réalisme poétique," "La Nouvelle Vague"), or films from a particular period.  Students will learn the vocabulary required for describing and analyzing French films. 3 credits.

French 341. A Survey of French Literature I: The Middle Ages Through the Enlightenment. A study of representative works and literary movements in French literature from the Middle Ages through the Enlightenment. Students will learn to use the methods and language of literary analysis. Prerequisite: FREN 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. *

French 342. Survey of French Literature II. Romanticism Through the New Novel. A study of representative works and literary movements in French literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will learn to use the methods and language of literary analysis. Prerequisite: FREN 202 or equivalent. 3 credits.

French 390. Directed or Independent Study. Must be approved by the head of the department. May be repeated as 391. 1-18 credits.

French 392. Internship in French. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of French. 1-18 credits.

French 400. Approaches to Teaching French. A study of theories of second language acquisition and their application to the teaching of languages in a communicative, interactive approach at the primary, middle, and secondary levels. Attention will be given to the teaching and testing of listening, reading, writing, speaking, and cultural understanding. Students will develop lesson plans, engage in peer-teaching, and integrate technology into teaching. Students should take this course in the semester prior to student teaching. 3 credits.

French 401. Advanced Grammar and Composition. Syntax and grammar through written work. Prerequisite: FREN 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. **

French 402. Advanced Conversation and Phonetics. Theory and practice in the spoken language. Current techniques and their uses in attaining mastery of oral French. Prerequisite: FREN 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. ***

French 411, 412. Studies in Literary Genre. Study of a particular genre in French literature, such as the Nouveau Roman, short story, romantic theater, symbolist poetry. Prerequisites: FREN 341 and 342. 3 credits. **

French 413, 414. French Literary Movements. Study of a particular movement or period in French literature, such as Realism, Neo-classicism, Naturalism, Surrealism, Existentialism. Prerequisites: FREN 341 and 342. 3 credits. **

French 415, 416. Major French Authors. Study of a particular author of French literature, such as Montaigne, Sartre, Hugo, Voltaire, Valery. Prerequisites: FREN 341 and 342. 3 credits. **

French 461. Senior Seminar: Literature in Cultural/Historical Context. A seminar for senior modern language majors concentrating in French, designed to integrate knowledge of French and Francophone history and culture as a background for literary analysis. Must be taken concurrently with FREN 490 (1 credit). Prerequisites: FREN 341 and 342. 2 credits. ** and ***

French 482. Directed Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary French Classroom. Required of all students seeking Pre K-12 Teaching Licensure in French. Each student is assigned to work with qualified cooperating teachers in two selected school settings off campus, for five weeks in each setting. Settings will be chosen among elementary, middle and secondary levels. The student teacher follows the schedule of each cooperating teacher and will take over all duties under the supervision of the cooperating teacher. The schedule involves a minimum teaching day of five to six hours for five days each week for ten to eleven weeks (300 hours total). Prerequisite: completion of the Modern Language major (French concentration), the Study Abroad requirement, and a minimum cumulative and major GPA of 2.50. 11 credits.

French 490. Directed Study. Individualized study; recommended only when material cannot be covered in scheduled courses. By permission of department head. 6 credits maximum.

French 492. Internship in French. Directed practicum in an applied setting that permits experiential learning. Students learn through performance in meaningful tasks in a variety of professional environments, such as foreign trade missions, government agencies, or the travel industry. It is intended for seniors not seeking teacher certification. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 1-16 credits.

French 495. Special Topics. Selected topics in French. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

French 498. Honors Research in French. Students conduct research in French under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits.

GERMAN Course Descriptions

General Education Course *
Writing Intensive Course **
Speaking Intensive Course ***

NOTE: GERM 101-202 constitute a sequence of courses. A student who has successfully completed a course in the sequence may not subsequently receive credit for any course that comes earlier in the sequence. A student who has successfully completed a course numbered 300 or higher may not take a 100 or 200 level course for credit. Students who have successfully completed more than two years of high school German may not take GERM 101 for credit.

German 101. Elementary I. Development of basic oral expression, listening and reading comprehension, and writing. Prerequisite: No previous formal instruction in German, or a limited amount of previous formal instruction in German. Followed by GERM 102. Three classes, one practical reinforcement session, and language lab work. 4 credits.

German 102. Elementary II. The skills of speaking, listening and reading comprehension, and writing are further developed. Prerequisite: GERM 101 or one or two years of previous formal instruction in German and an appropriate placement test score. Followed by GERM 201. Three classes, one practical reinforcement session, and language lab work. 4 credits.

German 201. Intermediate I. A course designed to help students develop skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing in German, and apply these skills in a context that recognizes and explores the particularities of German culture. Prerequisite: GERM 102 or an appropriate placement test score. Followed by GERM 202. 3 credits.*

German 202. Intermediate II. Students will continue to develop the skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing at a higher level, integrating a wide variety of topics and materials from the target culture. Prerequisite: GERM 201 or an appropriate placement test score. Successful completion of this course satisfies the foreign language requirement for the BA degree and is prerequisite for upper-level courses. 3 credits.

German 292. Internship in German. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of German. 1-18 credits.

German 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in German. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. Prerequisite: GERM 202. 1-3 credits. Does not satisfy requirement for BA degree.

German 311, 312. German Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses on German language, civilization, or culture. 3-16 credits per semester.

German 315. German for Business. A study of vocabulary, concepts and cultural topics related to basic business interactions in German countries for advanced-intermediate and advanced-level students. Participants receive oral and written situational practice necessary for successful integration into today's German-speaking business world. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. ***

German 320. Advanced German. Development of increased proficiency in all linguistic skills and a more extensive acquaintance with German culture. This course will prepare students for more advanced culture and literature courses, but will also prepare students to use German to communicate effectively and to function in a foreign community. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or appropriate placement test score. Successful completion of this course is recommended before students take upper-level courses. 3 credits.

German 330. Civilization and Culture. A study of German civilization and culture with emphasis on social institutions of the current century. Prerequisite: GERM 202. 3 credits. ***

German 341. Survey of German Literature I: The Age of Goethe. A study of representative works and literary movements in German literature from the Enlightenment through Romanticism. Students will learn to use the methods and language of literary analysis. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. *

German 342. Survey of German Literature II: Realism to the Present. A survey of 19th and 20th century German literature from Realism to the present with emphasis on dramatic and prose forms. Students will learn to use the methods and language of literary analysis. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. *

German 390. Directed or Independent Study. Must be approved by the head of the department. May be repeated as 391. 1-18 credits.

German 392. Internship in German. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of German. 1-18 credits.

German 400. Approaches to Teaching German. A study of theories of second language acquisition and their application to the teaching of languages in a communicative, interactive approach at the primary, middle, and secondary levels. Attention will be given to the teaching and testing of listening, reading, writing, speaking, and cultural understanding. Students will develop lesson plans, engage in peer-teaching, and integrate technology into teaching. Students should take this course in the semester prior to student teaching. 3 credits.

German 401. Advanced Grammar and Composition. Syntax and grammar through written work. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. **

German 402. Advanced Conversation and Phonetics. Theory and practice in the spoken language. Current techniques and their uses in attaining mastery of oral German. Prerequisite: GERM 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. ***

German 411, 412. Studies in Literary Genre. Study of a particular genre in German literature, such as the Novelle, lyric poetry, the German novel, modern drama, short story. Prerequisites: GERM 341 and 342. 3 credits. **

German 413, 414. German Literary Movements. Study of a particular movement or period in German literature, such as Romanticism, the Age of Goethe, Sturm und Drang, Realism, Naturalism. Prerequisites: GERM 341 and 342. 3 credits. **

German 415, 416. Major German Authors. Study of a particular German author such as Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Kafka, Thomas Mann. Prerequisites: GERM 341 and 342. 3 credits. **

German 461. Senior Seminar: Literature in Cultural/Historical Context. A seminar for senior modern language majors concentrating in German designed to integrate knowledge of German history and culture as a background for literary analysis. Must be taken concurrently with GERM 490 (1 credit). Prerequisites: GERM 341 and 342. 2 credits. ** and ***

German 482. Directed Teaching in the Secondary German Classroom. Required of all students seeking Pre K-12 Teaching Licensure in German. Each student is assigned to work with qualified cooperating teachers in two selected school settings off campus, for five weeks in each setting. Settings will be chosen among elementary, middle and secondary levels. The student teacher follows the schedule of each cooperating teacher and will take over all duties under the supervision of the cooperating teacher. The schedule involves a minimum teaching day of five to six hours for five days each week for ten to eleven weeks (300 hours total). Prerequisite: completion of the Modern Languages major (German concentration), the Study Abroad requirement, and a minimum cumulative and major GPA of 2.50. 11 credits.

German 490. Directed Study. Individualized study; recommended only when material cannot be covered in scheduled courses. By permission of department head. 6 credits maximum.

German 492. Internship in German. Directed practicum in an applied setting that permits experiential learning. Students learn through performance in meaningful tasks in a variety of professional environments, such as foreign trade missions, government agencies, or the travel industry. It is intended for seniors not seeking teacher certification. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 1-16 credits.

German 495. Special Topics. Selected topics in German. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

German 498. Honors Research in German. Students conduct research in German under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits.

JAPANESE Course Descriptions

Japanese 101. Introduction to Japanese. Development of basic oral expression and listening comprehension of the Japanese language. Introduction to basic socio-cultural aspects of modern Japan. No previous study of Japanese required or expected. Three lecture hours and one practical reinforcement period per week, and required language lab work. 4 credits.

Japanese 102. Elementary Japanese II. The skills of basic oral expression and listening comprehension are further developed. Prerequisite: Japanese 101. Three lecture and one practical reinforcement periods, and language lab work. 4 credits. 

SPANISH Course Descriptions

General Education Course *
Writing Intensive Course **
Speaking Intensive Course ***

NOTE: SPAN 101-202 constitute a sequence of courses. A student who has successfully completed a course in the sequence may not subsequently receive credit for any course that comes earlier in the sequence. A student who has successfully completed a course numbered 300 or higher may not take a 100 or 200 level course for credit. Students who have successfully completed more than two years of high school Spanish may not take SPAN 101 for credit. Students who have completed more than two years of high school Spanish, but who desire a review of elementary material, are encouraged to enroll in SPAN 105.

Spanish 101. Elementary I. Development of basic oral expression, listening and reading comprehension, and writing. Prerequisite: No previous formal instruction or a limited amount of previous formal instruction in Spanish. Followed by SPAN 102. Three classes, one practical reinforcement session, and language lab work. 4 credits.

Spanish 102. Elementary II. The skills of speaking, of listening and reading comprehension, and writing are further developed. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or an appropriate placement test score. Followed by SPAN 201. Three classes, one practical reinforcement session, and language lab work. 4 credits.

Spanish 105. Intensive Elementary I-II. Development of basic oral expression, listening and reading comprehension, and writing, for students with a limited amount of previous formal instruction in Spanish. Prerequisite: one or two years of high school Spanish or other formal instruction not to exceed three years. Followed by SPAN 201. Five classes and language lab work. 5 credits.

Spanish 201. Intermediate I. A course designed to help students develop skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing in Spanish, and apply these skills in a context that recognizes and explores the particularities of Spanish and Latin American cultures. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or an appropriate placement test score. Followed by SPAN 202. 3 credits.*

Spanish 202. Intermediate II. Students will continue to develop the skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing at a higher level, integrating a wide variety of topics and materials from the target culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or appropriate placement test score. Successful completion of this course satisfies the foreign language requirement for the BA degree and is prerequisite for upper-level courses. 3 credits.

Spanish 292. Internship in Spanish. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of Spanish. 1-18 credits.

Spanish 295. Special Topics. Selected Topics in Spanish. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. Prerequisite SPAN 202. 1-3 credits. Does not satisfy requirement for BA degree.

Spanish 302. Conversation. Practice in oral communication skills, including expansion of vocabulary and improvement of pronunciation and listening comprehension. A functional approach, emphasizing strategies for circumlocution, initiating and closing conversation, requesting and providing information, narrating, expressing wishes, complaints, and emotions, giving and receiving advice, and supporting opinions. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. ***

Spanish 311, 312. Hispanic Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in Hispanic language, civilization, or culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. 1-16 hours per semester.

Spanish 315. Spanish for Business. A study of vocabulary, concepts and cultural topics related to basic business interactions in Hispanic countries for advanced-intermediate and advanced-level students. Participants receive oral and written situational practice necessary for successful integration into today's Spanish-speaking business world. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. ***

Spanish 320. Advanced Spanish. Development of increased proficiency in all linguistic skills and a more extensive acquaintance with Hispanic culture. This course will prepare students for more advanced culture and literature courses, but will also prepare students to use Spanish to communicate effectively and to function in a foreign community. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or appropriate placement test score. Successful completion of this course is recommended before students take upper-level courses. 3 credits.

Spanish 330. Spanish Civilization and Culture. A study of Spanish civilization with emphasis on social institutions of the current century. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent, SPAN 320 recommended. 3 credits. ***

Spanish 331. Latin American Civilization and Culture. A study of the peoples and cultures of Latin America, with emphasis on the social institutions of the current century. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent, SPAN 320 recommended. 3 credits. *

Spanish 341. Survey of Spanish Literature I: Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque. A study of representative works and literary movements in Spanish (Peninsular) literature from the Middle Ages through the Baroque era. Students will learn to use the methods and language of literary analysis. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent, SPAN 320 recommended. 3 credits. *

Spanish 342. Survey of Spanish Literature II: Neoclassicism to the Present. A study of representative works and literary movements in Spanish (Peninsular) literature from Neoclassicism to the present. Students will learn to use the methods and language of literary analysis. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent, SPAN 320 recommended. 3 credits.

Spanish 351. Survey of Spanish American Literature I: The Age of Discovery and the Colonial Period. A study of selected writings of major Spanish American authors up to the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent, SPAN 320 recommended. 3 credits.

Spanish 352. Survey of Spanish American Literature II: The Era of Independence to the Present. A study of selected writings of major Spanish American authors from the nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent, SPAN 320 recommended. 3 credits. *

Spanish 390. Directed Study or Independent Study. Must be approved by the head of the department. May be repeated as 391. 1-18 credits.

Spanish 392. Internship in Spanish. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of Spanish. 1-18 credits.

Spanish 400. Approaches to Teaching Spanish. A study of theories of second language acquisition and their application to the teaching of languages in a communicative, interactive approach at the primary, middle, and secondary levels. Attention will be given to the teaching and testing of listening, reading, writing, speaking, and cultural understanding. Students will develop lesson plans, engage in peer-teaching, and integrate technology into teaching. Students should take this course in the semester prior to student teaching. 3 credits.

Spanish 401. Advanced Grammar and Composition. Syntax and grammar through written work. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. **

Spanish 402. Advanced Conversation and Phonetics. Theory and practice in the spoken language. Current techniques and their uses in attaining mastery of oral Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent. 3 credits. ***

Spanish 411, 412. Studies in Literary Genre. Study of a particular genre in Hispanic literature, such as Golden Age Drama, contemporary Hispanic novel. Prerequisites: SPAN 341 and 352. 3 credits. **

Spanish 413, 414. Hispanic Literary Movements. Study of a particular movement or period in Hispanic literature such as Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and the Generation of '98. Prerequisites: SPAN 341 and 352. 3 credits. **

Spanish 415, 416. Hispanic Authors. Study of a particular Hispanic author. Prerequisites: SPAN 341 and 352. 3 credits. **

Spanish 442. Latin American Novel. A survey of the main innovative trends in the Latin American novel especially after 1945. Prerequisites: SPAN 341 and 352. 3 credits. **

Spanish 461. Senior Seminar: Literature in Cultural/Historical Context. A seminar for senior modern language majors concentrating in Spanish, designed to integrate knowledge of Spanish and Spanish American history and culture as a background for literary analysis. Must be taken concurrently with SPAN 490 (1 credit). Prerequisites: SPAN 341 and 352. 2 credits. ** and ***

Spanish 482. Directed Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary Spanish Classroom. Required of all students seeking Pre K-12 Teaching Licensure in Spanish. Each student is assigned to work with qualified cooperating teachers in two selected school settings off campus, for five weeks in each setting. Settings will be chosen among elementary, middle and secondary levels. The student teacher follows the schedule of each cooperating teacher and will take over all duties under the supervision of the cooperating teacher. The schedule involves a minimum teaching day of five to six hours for five days each week for ten to eleven weeks (300 hours total). Prerequisite: completion of the Modern Languages major (Spanish concentration), the Study Abroad requirement, and a minimum cumulative and major GPA of 2.50. 11 credits.

Spanish 484. Teaching Spanish in the Elementary School. A directed practicum designed to give students first-hand experience teaching Spanish in the elementary school. Students attend weekly sessions with the instructor throughout the semester, as well as observe, assist and instruct the Spanish for Kids class at PECES for eleven weeks. May be taken twice for credit. Prerequisite: 6 credits in Spanish at the 300-level or higher. 1 credit.

Spanish 490. Directed Study. Individualized study; recommended only when material cannot be covered in scheduled courses. By permission of department head. 6 credits maximum.

Spanish 492. Internship in Spanish. Directed practicum in an applied setting that permits experiential learning. Students learn through performance in meaningful tasks in a variety of professional environments, such as foreign trade missions, government agencies, or the travel industry. It is intended for seniors not seeking teacher certification. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 1-16 credits.

Spanish 495. Special Topics. Selected topics in Spanish. The topics will vary each semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Spanish 498. Honors Research in Spanish. Students conduct research in Spanish under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits.

RELIGION

Faculty

Carolyn Craft, PhD, Professor of English and World Religions

RELIGION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

General Education Courses *

RELIGION 242. World Religions. An investigation of the nature and development of religious practices and traditions in other cultures, their teachings, rituals, institutions and ethics. The course includes prehistoric religion, the major traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and some other traditions which have contributed to their development. This course is recommended for students in the sophomore level and above. 3 credits. *

Note: Other religion courses may be available at Hampden-Sydney College.