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ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Note: ENGL 100 and 101, which satisfy Goal One of the General Education requirements, are prerequisite to all other English courses. 

General Education Courses *
Writing Intensive Course ** 

English 100. Rhetoric and Research. Reading and writing expository prose including the research paper. Oral presentation required. Prerequisite to ENGL 101. 3 credits. * 

English 101. Composition and Literary Analysis. Expository writing including research, and an introduction to literary analysis. Close reading of and frequent writing on literature, primarily fiction and poetry, with extended study of one major work read serially. ENGL 100 and 101 are prerequisite to all other English courses. 3 credits. * 

English 201. World  Literature. A study of selected movements and traditions (exclusive of American and British Literature) by major world writers such as Homer, the author of Gilgamesh, Murasaki, Li Po, Cervantes, Moliere, Goethe, Tolstoy, Garcia Marquez, Soyinka, Mahfouz, Rushdie, and Duras. May not be used to satisfy the Humanities requirement for the B.A., B.M., or B.F.A. degree. 3 credits.  

English 202. British Literature. A study of significant movements and traditions in fiction and poetry by major British authors such as the author of Beowulf, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Words-worth, Keats, George Eliot, Tennyson, and Yeats. May not be used to satisfy the Humanities requirement for the B.A., B.M., or B.F.A. Degree. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. * 

English 203. American Literature. A study of significant movements and traditions in fiction and poetry by major American authors such as Bradstreet, Emerson, Melville, Dickinson, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hughes, and Eliot. May not be used to satisfy the Humanities requirement for the B.A., B.M., or B.F.A. Degree. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. * 

English 210. Introduction to Journalism.  Fundamentals of newswriting and reporting for the student press. 3 credits. ** 

English 211. Writing Fiction. The short story and other forms of fiction. 3 credits. 

English 212. Writing Poetry. Traditional and contemporary techniques in poetry. 3 credits. 

English 213. Writing Non-Fiction. Narrative nonfiction, article and feature writing, and other forms of literary journalism. 3 credits. ** 

English 214. Technical Writing. A study and application of writing techniques for the dissemination of scientific and technical information. 3 credits. ** 

English 221. Popular Literature. A study of contemporary nonfiction, genre fiction, and other forms of literature of proven mass appeal. 3 credits. 

English 222. Popular Culture and the Mass Media. Contemporary print and electronic media, with emphasis on film, television, pop music, and the press. 3 credits. 

English 256. The Art of Film I. Introduction to theory and techniques of the motion picture through screenings of classic and contemporary feature films. 3 credits. 

English 257. The Art of Film II. A study of major directors of film genres. 3 credits. 

English 258. Women and Film.  A study of women directors and the history and conventions of portraying women in film. Prerequisites: ENGL 100 and 101. 3 credits. 

English 260. Mythology. A study of classical and Germanic mythologies, with emphasis upon their influences in various literary traditions. Some consideration may be given to other myths. 3 credits. 

English 263. The Bible as Literature. The Old and New Testaments as works of literature. 3 credits. 

ENGLISH 292.  Internship in English.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of English.  1-18 credits. 

English 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in English. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits. 

English 311, 312. Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad. 1-16 credits  per semester. 

Courses in the Major Literary Periods 

Note: These courses are designed primarily for English majors and minors. 

English 321. British Literature I. From the beginnings through the sixteenth century. Emphasis on such major works and writers as Beowulf, Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe and Shakespeare. 3 credits. 

English 322. British Literature II. The late Renaissance through the age of Johnson, with emphasis on such major writers as Donne, Milton, Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson. 3 credits. 

English 323. British Literature III. The Romantic and Victorian ages, with emphasis on such poets as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Tennyson, and Browning and such prose writers as Carlyle, Dickens, and Eliot. 3 credits. 

English 324. British Literature IV.  The twentieth century. Emphasis on such major writers as Hardy, Yeats, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, and Lessing. 3 credits. 

English 331. American Literature To 1865. The beginnings through the period of the Civil War, with emphasis on such writers as Bradstreet, Franklin, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Douglass, and Whitman. 3 credits. 

English 332. American Literature 1865-1920. The age of realism and naturalism with emphasis on such major writers as Dickinson, Twain, James, Dreiser, Crane, Chopin, Chesnutt, and Wharton. 3 credits. 

English 333. American Literature Since 1920. The modern age with emphasis on such major writers as Eliot, Frost, Cather, Hemingway, Hughes, Faulkner, Wright, Rich, and Morrison. 3 credits. 

Other 300-level courses 

English 350. Introduction to Linguistics. An overview of structural, cognitive, social, and historical dimensions of language. Applies techniques of language analysis to a variety of language uses. 3 credits. 

English 380. Children’s Literature. A survey of poetry, prose, and other media appropriate for elementary students. Primarily for those preparing for careers in elementary education and library science. 3 credits. 

English 381. Literature for Young Adults. A survey of young adult literature from 1967 to the present. Selection and evaluation of books, poetry, short stories, and other media. Instruction in and practice with response theory using written assignments and oral presentations. 3 credits. 

English 382. Traditional and Modern English Grammar. A brief consideration of the history of the English language and a detailed study of English sentence structure, using the perspectives of traditional, structural, and transformational-generative grammar. 3 credits. 

ENGLISH 390.  Directed Study or Independent Study.  Must be repeated by the head of the department.  May be repeated as 391.  1-18 credits. 

ENGLISH 392.  Internship in English.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of English.  1-18 credits. 

Genre Courses 

Prerequisite: completion of Goal 3 of the General Education requirements, and either one 300-level course in a literary period, or permission of the instructor.  

English 411. Epic. Study in the tradition and qualities of the epic as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. 3 credits. ** 

English 412. Poetry. Study in the tradition and qualities of poetry as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more specific forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** 

English 413. The Novel. Study in the tradition and qualities of the novel as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** 

English 414. Short Story. Study in the tradition and qualities of the short story as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** 

English 415. Drama.  Study in the tradition and qualities of drama as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 crdits.  ** 

English 421, 422. Major Figures in Fiction. Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American writers. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** 

English 423, 424. Major Figures in Poetry. Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American writers. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. ** 

English 425. Shakespeare. Extended study in the works of William Shakespeare. 3 credits. ** 

Other 400-level courses 

Prerequisites: Completion of Goal 3 of the General Education requirements, and either one 300-level course in a literary period, or permission of the instructor.  

English 431. Arthurian Literature. Comparative study of Arthurian material of various countries from the medieval through the modern periods. 3 credits. ** 

English 432. Women and Literature. Comparative study of the tradition of literature by and about women. 3 credits. ** 

English 441. Ethnic Literature. Comparative study of the literary tradition of an ethnic group such as Afro-American, Jewish, Chicano, or Native American peoples. 3 credits. ** 

English 442. Regional Literature. Comparative study of the literary tradition of a region, such as the American South, or Ireland. 3 credits. ** 

English 443. Postcolonial Literature. Study of literature written in English from countries during and after colonial contact with Britain, excluding the United States. 3 credits. ** 

English 444. Literature and Culture. Extended study of British or American literature and culture at a particular point in time or of a literary theme over time. Emphasis on the relationship of literature to its cultural context, including politics, social organization, art, and music. Prerequisite: Completion of Goal 3 of the General Education requirements, and either one 300-level courses in a literary period, or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits.

English 451. Continental Literature I. Study of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance European classics in translation. 3 credits. ** 

English 452. Continental Literature II.  Study of European literature of the neo-classical, romantic, and modern periods in translation. 3 credits. ** 

English 461. Literary Criticism: Senior Seminar. Study of the history and aims of literary criticism from Plato and Aristotle to the present, including oral and written criticism of literary works. Capstone course for English majors. Enrollment limited to seniors and those with permission of instructor. 3 credits. ** 

English 470. Professional Writing Skills. Intensive reading and writing workshop focused on developing professional expository prose within the student's field of endeavor. The last half of the course will be devoted to writing workshops critiquing "works" in progress of some "real world" writing project. 3 credits. ** 

English 480. The Teaching of English. A study of current practices with emphasis on specific techniques and materials. 3 credits. ** 

English 482. Directed Teaching in the Secondary Classroom. Required of all students seeking Secondary Teaching Licensure in English. Each student is assigned to work with a qualified cooperating teacher in a selected school setting off-campus. The student teacher goes to the school setting and follows the schedule of the cooperating teacher(s) for a ten to eleven week period. This schedule involves a minimum teaching day of six hours for five days each week for ten/eleven weeks (300 hours total). Prerequisite: Completion of all methods courses with ENGL 480 and 483 having been taken within two years of student teaching. Minimum cumulative and major GPA of 2.50. 11 credits. 

English 483. Writing: Theory and Practice. A study of strategies for improving writing. Includes discussion of analyzing subject matter, determining purpose and audience, drafting, revising, editing (including using correct mechanics), and evaluating the elements of effective writing. Prerequisite: Engl 382 and EDUC 325 or ENGL 382 and sped 301 or ENGL 350. 3 credits.** 

English 484. Evaluating and Tutoring Writing. Instruction in diagnosing and evaluating writing, and practice in giving individualized instruction in writing through the Writing Center. May be repeated twice for credit. 1 credit. 

English 490. Independent Study. A directed reading and/or research program administered by qualified specialists in the department. The student must secure the director's approval prior to registering for the course. 1-3 credits per semester. 

English 492. Internship in English. Directed practicum in an applied setting that permits supervised experiential learning. Students perform meaningful tasks related to the dicipline in professional environments, such as publishing and journalism on and off campus. The student will complete a practicum agreement established with the department chair, department adviser, and work supervisor. 1-6 credits. 

English 495. Special Topics. Selected topics in English. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits. 

ENGLISH 498.  Honor Research in English.  Students conduct research in English under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee.  May be repeated as 499.  3 credits.

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