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Department of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance

Bette L. Harris, Chair
Chris Freeland, Secretary

The Department offers three B.S. degree programs, one in community health education, one in therapeutic recreation, and one in physical education with options in either teaching physical and health education, exercise science, or athletic training. The department also offers a teaching endorsement in driver education, and minor programs in dance education, health education, outdoor education, and coaching. A variety of activity classes, whose goal is to develop fitness and skills in life-time sports, are offered to all students. Health and activity classes are structured to provide students with knowledge about current health problems and to help them develop behaviors and attitudes that will aid in maintaining a state of optimal health and fitness throughout the life-span.

Faculty

Robert J. Beaudet, Jr.,Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physical Education
Sarah M. Bingham, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physical Education
J. Charles Blauvelt, Ph.D.,
Associate Professor of  Physical Education
Loretta E. Coughlin, M.S., Lecturer in Physical Education
Paul A. Giannotti, M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Athletic Training
Charlotte L. Guynes, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Health Education
Bette L. Harris, Ed.D., Professor of  Physical Education
Judith R. Johnson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of  Physical Education
Chrystyna Kosarchyn, Ph.D., Professor of Health Education
Sharon M. Menegoni, M.S.,
Assistant Professor of Athletic Training
Cathy J. Roy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Exercise Science
John Van Vorst, M.S., Lecturer in Physical Education
Patricia L. Williams, Ph.D
., Assistant Professor of Health Education
Rodney Williams, B.A., Artist-in-Residence, Dance

COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM

Faculty

Chrystyna Kosarchyn, Ph.D., Program Coordinator, Professor of Health Education
Charlotte L. Guynes, Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor of Health Education
Patricia L. Williams, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Health Education

The program in Community Health Education is designed to prepare students for a career in health education in community settings. As a profession that bridges the gap between health information and health practices, community health education offers employment opportunities in a variety of settings:  community-based organizations and agencies such as public health departments and voluntary non-profit organizations; health care facilities such as clinics, hospitals, health maintenance organizations, and nursing homes; as well as in corporate settings.  Graduates of this program are eligible to sit for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam and to apply for advanced study in a variety of health education/health promotion graduate programs.

Admission to the Community Health Education Program requires an application process that must be completed by the second semester of the student's sophomore year which includes the following components:

a.      completion of written application
b.     a 2.5 overall grade point average (GPA)
c.      grades of C or better in English 100 and 101, HLTH 200 and 205, and BIOL 206 and 207

Furthermore, the following requirements must be met prior to the student's senior internship:

a.      the completion of all coursework
b.     a 2.75 overall GPA
c.      a 2.75 GPA in the major
d.     a recommendation from the instructor of HLTH 415

COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION MAJOR, B.S. DEGREE

A.    General Education Core Requirements. 33 credits

      See General Education Requirements

B.     Additional Degree Requirements. 10 credits

SOCL 102 Contemporary Social Problems/3 credits
MATH 121 Functions and Graphs/3 credits
Science elective 4 credits
C.     Major Requirements. 77 credits
Professional Core
HLTH 200 Introduction to Public Health/3 credits*
HLTH 205  Health and Wellness/3 credits*
HLTH 260 First Aid/3 credits
HLTH 275 Medical Terminology/2 credits
HLTH 315  Health Promotion Programming I/3 credits
HLTH 325 Human Diseases/3 credits
HLTH 366 Public Health Issues/3 credits
HLTH 375  Management of Health Promotion Programs/3 credits
HLTH 415 Health Promotion Programming II/4 credits
HLTH 492 Internship in Public Health/12 credits 
Support Courses
BIOL 206 Anatomy and Physiology/4 credits*
BIOL 207 Anatomy and Physiology/4 credits*
ENGL 214  Technical Writing/3 credits
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology/3 credits 
SOCL 370 Medical Sociology/3 credits
COMM 200  Fundamentals of Communication/3 credits
RECR 437 Group Dynamics/3 credits
Professional Electives
Select five (5) courses from the following list:
HLTH 212 Human Sexuality/3 credits
HLTH 215 Physical Activity and Health/3 credits
HLTH 295 Special Topics/3 credits         
HLTH 310 Environmental Health/3 credits
HLTH 313 Drugs and Human Behavior/3 credits
HLTH 335  Nutrition                /3 credits
HLTH 430 Women's Health Issues/3 credits 

 
D. Total Credits Required for B.S. Degree in Community Health Education - 120 hours

E.  Courses in which students must have a grade of  C or higher.*

F.  All courses are not offered each semester – see course sequence outline on CHED website for when each course is offered.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS

The Health and Physical Education curriculum offers programs of study leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in physical education in three areas: Athletic Training, Exercise Science, and in teaching Physical and Health Education (PHETE). All majors must take a core of physical education theory and skill classes; then, depending upon interest and career goals, students will take course work in one of the following program options:

PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION TEACHER EDUCATION

N,K-12 OPTION

Faculty

Sarah M. Bingham, Ph.D., Program Coordinator, Associate Professor of Physical Education

Students electing this program will be endorsed to teach physical and health education at the elementary and secondary levels. The program provides the scientific background courses for teaching physical and health education and activity skills as well as a scientific, analytical approach to movement. 

Admission to the teacher education program requires that the student complete an application, have acceptable student evaluations from PHED 350 and PHED 380, record successful completion of Praxis I, demonstrate competency in written and oral English (earn a grade of  “C” or better in ENGL 100 and 101), and possess an overall grade point average of 2.50. All physical education majors must make a minimum grade of “C” on each course taken as a part of the activity core and the physical education activities required under the general education requirements. Additional policies and standards for physical education majors are in the Physical and Health Education Teacher Education Student Handbook.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, B.S. DEGREE

Elementary and Secondary Teacher Education Option N, K-12

Physical and Health Education Licensure

A.  General Education Core Requirement. 33 credits.

      See General Education Requirements

B.  Additional Degree Requirements. 10 credits.

BIOL 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology/4 credits
Math elective/3 credits
Social Science elective/3 credits
C.  Major Requirements. 84 credits.
Professional Core
PHED 275 Foundations of Physical Education and Sport/3 credits
PHED 386 Biomechanics/4 credits   
PHED 387 Physiology of Exercise/4 credits
Total/11 credits
Teaching Option Activity Requirements
PHED 150  Fitness Education/1 credit   
PHED 350 Skill Acquisition and Analysis I:  Team Sports/3 credits 
PHED 351 Skill Acquisition and Analysis II:  Educational Gymnastics and Dance/3 credits   
PHED 352 Skill Acquisition and Analysis III:  Lifetime Activities/3 credits 
Take 2 credits from the following:
PHED 212  Lifeguarding and Emergency Water Safety/2 credits
PHED 315 Water Safety Instructor/2 credits 
TOTAL CREDITS/12 
Teaching Option Requirements
BIOL 207 Human Anatomy and Physiology/4 credits
PHED 175 Introduction to the Profession of Health and Physical Education/1 credit
PHED 280 Motor Development/3 credits
PHED 364 Adapted Physical Education/3 credits
PHED 380 Sport Pedagogy I:  The Orientation to Teaching/3 credits
PHED 381 Sport Pedagogy II:  An Analysis and Design of Motor Skills/3 credits
PHED 382 Sport Pedagogy III:  Curriculum Development and Application in Physical Education/3 credits
PHED 463 Assessment and Evaluation in Health and Physical Education/3 credits
PHED 482 Directed Teaching in Elementary and Secondary Physical Education and Health/12 credits
PHED 483 Seminar in Teaching/2 credits
RECR 238 Outdoor Education in the Schools/3 credits
HLTH 205 Health and Wellness/3 credits
HLTH 212 Human Sexuality/3 credits
HLTH 260 Emergency Care and First Aid/3 credits
HLTH 313  Drugs and Human Behavior/3 credits
HLTH 335 Nutrition/3 credits
HLTH 465 Comprehensive School Health Education/4 credits
EDUC 430 Reading in the Content Area/2 credits
Total Credits/61

 D.  Concentration in Area of Adapted Physical Education

       A physical education major in the elementary-secondary option may elect an adapted physical education  concentration, driver education endorsement or a coaching minor.

Adapted Physical Education* 

PHED 200 Introduction to Athletic Training/3 credits
PHED 381 Sport Pedagody II:  An Analysis and Design of Motor Skills/3 credits **
RECR 301 Therapeutic Recreation in Mental Health Settings/3 credits
RECR 303 Therapeutic Recreation and Persons with Physical Disabilities/3 credits            
TOTAL/9 credits
Must take SOCL 222 *
Courses already required of Physical Education majors. **

Driver Education Endorsement

     Any student may elect to take the following sequence of courses and become endorsed to teach driver education in secondary schools.

HLTH 260 Emergency Care and First Aid/3 credits ** 
HLTH 301 Safety Education/3 credits 
HLTH 302 Driver Education/3 credits
TOTAL/9 credits

Total Credits Required for B.S. Degree in Physical and Health Education with Elementary/Secondary Endorsement N, K-12   - 127

Total Credits Required for B.S. Degree in Physical and Health Education with Elementary/Secondary Endorsement N, K-12 with Concentration in Adapted Physical Education   -  136

Total Credits Required for B.S. Degree in Physical and Health Education with Elementary/Secondary Endorsement N, K-12 with Endorsement in Driver Education   -  133

NON-TEACHING OPTIONS 

ATHLETIC TRAINING

Faculty

Sharon M. Menegoni, M.S., Program Coordinator, Assistant Professor of Athletic Training
Paul A. Giannotti, M.Ed.,
Assistant Professor of Athletic Training

The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) accredited program in athletic training is designed to prepare students for a career in the field of athletic training, or may serve as the pre-professional course of study for physical therapy and sports medicine. The course of study leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree via the Athletic Training Education Program includes one year of pre-athletic training, a selection process, and three years in the professional and clinical education phase of the program. Admission to the Athletic Training Education Program is competitive. Because of enrollment limitations, students who have completed the pre-athletic training year at Longwood College cannot be assured of admission to the professional and clinical education phase of the Athletic Training Education Program.

Admission to the athletic training program is contingent upon the student satisfactorily completing the following prerequisites:

       a.  written application;

       b.  100 hours of athletic training directed observation/work experience at one of the program’s clinical sites;

       c.  30 semester hours of college course work completed at Longwood College;

       d.  a 2.25 overall grade point average (GPA) and a 2.5 GPA or better in all physical education and athletic training major courses are required at the time of application;

       e.  courses PHED 200, 210, BIOL 207, and CHEM 101 or BIOL 206;

       f.   grades of C or better in PHED 200, 210, and BIOL 207;

       g.  completion of all Level I Skill Competencies and Proficiencies, and

       h.    demonstrate appropriate clinical performance and conduct as determined by clinical instructor evaluations of the directed-observation experience.

Students who are accepted into the program are required to accumulate a minimum of 800 hours of supervised clinical experience with the Longwood College intercollegiate athletic program or an affiliated site. Students will also complete an off campus clinical internship at a site of their choice during the final semester of the program. Graduates of this program are eligible to sit for the National Athletic Trainers’ Association certification examination.  The course of study for students planning to participate as a member of an intercollegiate athletic team is five years.

The technical standards set forth by the Athletic Training Education Program establish the essential qualities considered necessary for students admitted to this program to achieve the knowledge, skills, and competencies of an entry-level athletic trainer, as well as meet the expectations of the program's accrediting agency (CAAHEP).  Technical standards for program admission are published in the Athletic Training Education Program Curriculum Handbook.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJOR, B.S. DEGREE

ATHLETIC TRAINING

A.  General Education Core Requirements. 29 credits

      See General Education Requirements

B.  Additional Degree Requirements. 10 credits

BIOL 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology/4 credits
Math 271 Applied Statistics/3 credits
PSYC 101  Introduction to Psychology/3 credits
C.  Major Requirements. 83 credits.
Professional Core
PHED 275  Foundations of Physical Education and Sport/3 credits
PHED 386 Biomechanics/4 credits
PHED 387 Physiology of Exercise/4 credits
TOTAL/11 credits
Athletic Training Option Requirements
Required Courses:
PHYS 101 General Physics I/4 credits*
PHYS 102 General Physics II/4 credits
BIOL 207 Human Anatomy and Physiology/4 credits     
HLTH 205  Health and Wellness/3 credits
HLTH 260 Emergency Health Care and First Aid/3 credits
HLTH 335  Nutrition/3 credits             
HLTH 340 Pharmacology/2 credits 
PHED 200 Introduction to Athletic Training/3 credits
PHED 210  Clinical Methods in Athletic Training/3 credits
PHED 300 Injury Mechanism and Assessment I (Lower Extremity)/3 credits
PHED 310 Injury Mechanism and Assessment II (Upper Extremity)/3 credits 
PHED 320 Therapeutic Modalities/2 credits
PHED 325 Therapeutic Exercise/3 credits
PHED 330 Injury Mechanism and Assessment III (Head, Neck and Spine)/3 credits
PHED 385 Sport Psychology/3 credits
PHED 410  Athletic Training Administration/2 credits
PHED 420 Medical Aspects of Athletic Training/2 credits
PHED 470 Research in Health, Physical Education and Recreation/3 credits
Take one of the following:      
CHEM 101 General Chemistry/4 credits*
or
CHEM 111 Fundamentals of Chemistry/4 credits
TOTAL/57*
Activity Requirements
PHED 116 Beginning Weight Training/1 credit
Complete one of the following:  
PHED 110 Non-Swimmers/1 credit
PHED 111 Beginning Swimming/1 credit
PHED 112  Water Aerobics/1 credit
PHED 211 Intermediate Swimming/1 credit
PHED 212  Lifeguard/Emergency Water Safety/1 credit
PHED 315 Water Safety Instruction/1 credit
TOTAL/2 credits
Clinical Requirements
PHED 371 Practicum in Athletic Training I/1 credit
PHED 372 Practicum in Athletic Training II/1 credit
PHED 471    Practicum in Athletic Training III/1 credit
PHED 472 Practicum in Athletic Training IV/1 credit
PHED 473 Practicum in Athletic Training V/1 credit
PHED 492 Clinical Internship in Athletic Training/12 credits
TOTAL/17 credits

*   One of the above courses will count as a general education course under Goal 5 and will be considered as 4 credits of the 33 total required credits.

D.  Total Credits Required for B.S. Degree with Athletic Training   -  126

EXERCISE SCIENCE

Faculty

Cathy J. Roy,  Ph.D.,  Program Coordinator, Assistant Professor of Exercise Science

The Exercise Science Option is designed to provide students with a foundation in the sciences with emphasis in exercise, health, and sport sciences. Students enrolled in this option are prepared for entrance into health-related fitness and sport science professions. Graduates of this program are eligible to sit for certification examinations offered by the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Strength and Conditioning Association, and to apply for advanced study in a variety of applied science and allied health programs.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJOR, B.S. DEGREE

EXERCISE SCIENCE OPTION

A.  General Education Core Requirement. 29 credits.

      See General Education Requirements

      Goal 5. Both CHEM 101 and PHYS 101 required as part of Fitness Option Requirements.*

B.  Additional Degree Requirements. 10 credits.

BIOL 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology/4 credits
Take one of the following:
MATH 171 Statistical Decision Making/3 credits
MATH 271  Applied Statistics/3 credits
Take one of the following:
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology/3 credits*
PSYC 221 Life-Span Developmental Psychology/3 credits*
C.  Major Requirements. 80-81 credits.
Professional Core  
PHED 275 Foundations of Physical Education and Sport/3 credits     
PHED 280  Motor Development/3credits 
PHED 386   Biomechanics/4 credits**       
PHED 387 Physiology of Exercise/4 credits**              
PHED 462 Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Education Programs/3 credits    
TOTAL/17 credits     
Activity Requirements
PHED 116    Beginning Weight Training/1 credit
PHED 126 Beginning Yoga/1 credit
PHED 216 Advanced Weight Training/1credit  
Take one of the following:
PHED 104 Beginning Tennis/1 credit
PHED 108  Beginning Golf/1 credit
PHED 120 Beginning Racquetball/1 credit
Take one of the following:
PHED 112  Water Aerobics/1 credit
 PHED 127 Aerobic Dancing/1 credit
Take one of the following:
PHED 110   Non-Swimming/1 credit
 PHED 111 Beginning Swimming/1 credit
PHED 211   Intermediate Swimming/1 credit
PHED 212 Lifeguarding and Emergency Water Safety/2 credits
PHED 315  Water Safety Instructor/2 credits
TOTAL/6 or 7 credits
Fitness Option Requirements
BIOL 207 Human Anatomy and Physiology/4 credits*           
CHEM 101  General Chemistry/4 credits*     
PHYS 101 General Physics/4 credits*    
PHED 364 Sport Psychology/3 credits**              
PHED 392  Fitness Internship/8 credits       
PHED 399  Advanced Exercise Physiology/3 credits
PHED 486  Practicum/2 credits     
PHED 487 Practicum/2 credits    
PHED 488 Exercise Intervention in Disease/3 credits      
PHED 497 Special Projects/3 credits
HLTH 205  Health and Wellness/3 credits
HLTH 215 Physical Activity and Health/3 credits
HLTH 260 Nutrition/3 credits
HLTH 315  Health Promotion Programming I/3 credits
HLTH 335      Emergency Care and First Aid/3 credits
COMM 101  Oral Communication/3 credits
Take one of the following:
MANG 360  Principles of Management/3 credits
MARK 380 Principles of Marketing/3 credits
TOTAL/57 credits

D.  General Electives/0-1 credit

E.   Total Credits Required for B.S. Degree with Exercise Science Option   -  120

      Courses in which students must have a grade of C- or higher.*      Courses in which students must have a grade of C or higher.**

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION PROGRAM

Faculty

Rena A. Koesler, Ph.D., Program Coordinator, Associate Professor of Recreation
Susan E. Lynch, Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor of Therapeutic Recreation

Therapeutic Recreation is an allied health profession that utilizes recreation and leisure experiences to assist people with various disabilities in developing and maintaining a personally meaningful leisure lifestyle which encompasses functional independence, health and well-being. Through specific therapy, leisure education, and recreation participation, therapeutic recreation is practiced in a variety of clinical and community settings such as: rehabilitation and general medical facilities; mental health and psychiatric facilities for children and adults; substance treatment programs; corrections; specialized and outdoor programs for adjudicated youth; long-term and day-care facilities and nursing homes; residences for individuals with developmental disabilities, and in community recreation and park agencies.

Longwood’s nationally accredited and recognized Therapeutic Recreation Program provides students with a comprehensive foundation in leisure theory and an in-depth concentration in disability studies and therapeutic recreation principles and practices. Students graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree in Therapeutic Recreation which prepares them for many entry-level positions.

Academic course work is complemented with 120 hours of preliminary fieldwork and two professionally supervised internship experiences which may be completed in a variety of agencies and locations. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 overall and a 2.25 in the major in order to be eligible for pre-professional practice.

Upon graduation, students become eligible to sit for the national certification exam through the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC).

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION MAJOR, B.S. DEGREE

A.  General Education Core Requirement. 33 credits.

      See General Education Requirements  

B.  Additional Degree Requirements. 10 credits.

BIOL 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology I/4 credits
CMSC 121 Introduction to Computer Science/3 credits
PSYC 221 Life-Span Developmental Psychology/3 credits
C.  Major Requirements. 77 credits.
RECR 110 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation/3 credits  
RECR 111  Introduction to Leisure Service Delivery/3 credits
RECR 205      Recreation Leadership and Activity/3 credits
RECR 237    Experiential and Outdoor Education Programming/3 credits    
RECR 300    Pre-Internship Seminar/1 credit  
RECR 301    Therapeutic Recreation in Mental Health Settings/3 credits
RECR 303 Therapeutic Recreation and Persons with Physical Disabilities/3 credits              
RECR 304 Leisure and Aging/3 credits   
RECR 305 Concepts of Leisure/3 credits        
RECR 308  Therapeutic Recreation in Clinical Settings/3 credits       
RECR 310   Plan and Design of Recreation Areas/3 credits   
RECR 360   Therapeutic Recreation for Children with Illnesses and Disabilities/3 credits                   
RECR 370  Program Planning and Development in Therapeutic Recreation/3 credits
RECR 392**  Junior Internship/6 credits
RECR 410  Supervision and Administration of Recreation/3 credits
RECR 426   Ethical and Legal Issues in Health and Human Services/3 credits
RECR 437  Group Dynamics/3 credits
RECR 470 Research in Health, Physical Education and Recreation/3 credits
RECR 492**  Senior Internship/12 credits
HLTH 260  Emergency Care and First Aid/3 credits
BIOL 207   Human Anatomy and Physiology II/4 credits
PSYC 356    Abnormal Psychology/3 credits
TOTAL/77 credits
Must have a 2.0 overall and 2.25 in major courses**

D.  Professional Electives: 4 credits

E.   Total Credits Required for B.S. Degree in Therapeutic Recreation - 124

MINORS

The Health and Physical Education curriculum offers minor programs in coaching, dance education, health education and outdoor education.

COACHING MINOR

Bette L. Harris, Ed.D., Program Coordinator, Professor of  Physical Education

Students interested in the coaching minor must enroll in 18 hours of specialized professional courses in physical education. Any student may elect to take the following sequence of courses for a minor in coaching:

HLTH 260 Emergency Care and First Aid/3 credits
PHED 200  Introduction to Athletic Training/3 credits
PHED 280 Motor Development/3 credits
PHED 385 Sport Psychology/3 credits
PHED 462 Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Education Programs/3 credits
PHED 486 Practicum/3-6 credits
TOTAL/18-21 credits

DANCE EDUCATION MINOR

Rodney Williams, B.A., Program Coordinator, Artist-in-Residence

Students interested in a dance minor must audition to enter the program and are expected to be active members of the Longwood College Company of Dancers for a minimum of two years. Students must also successfully complete twenty hours of required courses in dance. The dance education minor is open to all students attending Longwood College. Students must audition before being placed in DANC 132, Advanced Modern Dance.

Core (15 credit hours)
DANC 132  Advanced Modern Dance/2 credits 
DANC 267 Historical Perspectives of Dance/4 credits
DANC 365   Dance Composition/3 credits   
DANC 466  Teaching of Dance Theory/3 credits 
DANC 495  Special Topics/3 credits  
Electives    
Choose 5 courses: 5-6 credit hours      
DANC (PHED) 127 Aerobic Dancing/1 credit    
DANC (PHED) 128 Beginning Social and Recreation Dance/1 credit 
DANC (PHED) 129 Beginning Ballet/1 credit  
DANC (PHED) 130 Beginning Jazz/1 credit  
DANC (PHED) 131 Beginning Modern Dance/1 credit  
DANC (PHED) 133   Ballroom and Social Dance/1 credit      
DANC (PHED) 136 International Folk Dance/1 credit
DANC (PHED) 138   African Dance/1 credit
DANC (PHED) 229 Intermediate Ballet/1 credit
DANC (PHED) 230  Intermediate Jazz/1 credit
DANC (PHED) 231  Intermediate Modern Dance/1 credit
DANC (PHED) 232 Advanced Modern Dance/2 credit
TOTAL/20-21 credits

HEALTH EDUCATION MINOR

Chrystyna Kosarchyn, Ph.D., Program Coordinator, Professor of Health Education

The minor in Health Education is designed to provide students with information about current health issues and to help them develop attitudes and behaviors that will be helpful in attaining a state of optimal health throughout their lifetime.  This minor is open to students in any major program other than those in the Physical and Health Education Teacher Education Program (PHETE) and is particularly complementary to degrees in the health and human services areas.

Core (6 credits)
HLTH 205 Health and Wellness/3 credits
HLTH 325    Human Diseases/3 credits
Elective (12 credits)
Choose 4 courses:
HLTH 212       Human Sexuality/3 credits
HLTH 215    Physical Activity and Health/3 credits
HLTH 310 Environmental Health/3 credits
HLTH 313   Drugs and Human Behavior/3 credits
HLTH 335  Nutrition/3 credits
HLTH 430 Women’s Health Issues/3 credits
TOTAL/18 credits

 OUTDOOR EDUCATION MINOR

Rena A. Koesler, Ph.D., Program Coordinator,  Associate Professor of Recreation

The minor in Outdoor Education is open to those students interested in developing the skills, knowledge and experience in the outdoor education field.  Students will gain the necessary skills and experience to teach, lead, and/or serve individuals who wish to use the natural environment as well as enhance their appreciation of it.  Students who minor in Outdoor Education are required to take the following courses.  Grades below  “C-“ will not apply toward the fulfillment of minor requirements.

RECR 237 Experiential and Outdoor Education Programming/3 credits
OR
RECR 238  Outdoor Education in the Schools/3 credits
RECR 340

Introduction to Outdoor Adventure Skills/3 credits (canoeing, rockclimbing, orienteering)

RECR 350 Ropes Course and Initiative Dynamics/2 credits
RECR 375 Leadership Development Through Wilderness Pursuits/3 credits
HLTH 260  Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care/3 credits
RECR 420   Environmental Education Resources/3 credits
RECR 487       Practicum Experience in Outdoor Education/1-3 credits
TOTAL/18-20 credits

HEALTH EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

General Education Course *
Writing Intensive Course **

HEALTH EDUCATION 200.  Introduction to Public Health. An introduction to the public health profession in terms of the various settings in which public health educators practice, the roles they play and the skills they need.  Designed as the initial course for students in the public health education major, this course is open to non-majors as well. 3 credits.

Health Education 205. Health and Wellness. Focusing on the application of scientific facts and principles to current health issues, this course is designed to help foster intelligent decision-making in the areas of health needs and health behaviors. 3 credits.

Health Education 210. World Health Issues. Designed to help students develop an understanding of current health problems and issues in the world community, this course examines the cultural, geographic, environmental, social, economic and political influences on health status and health care systems of representative nations, especially those of the non-western world. 3 credits. *

Health Education 212. Human Sexuality. An examination of the biological, psychological, cultural and behavioral aspects of sexuality with emphasis on providing the student with practical and meaningful information pertaining to human sexuality and family life while encouraging the development of responsible sexual behaviors and attitudes. 3 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 215.  Physical Activity and Health.  This course examines the effect of physical activity on health and diseases.  Patterns and trends in physical activity are also covered as well as understanding and promoting physical activity in a variety of populations/settings. 3 credits.

Health Education 260.  Emergency Care and First Aid. Emergency care procedures necessary to sustain life and maintain life support until the victims of an accident or sudden illness are cared for by more qualified medical personnel. Knowledge and skill gained will lead to certification in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 3 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 275.  Medical Terminology.  An on-line course designed to familiarize students entering the public health field with the fundamentals of medical terminology and to provide them with the skills to learn medical terminology easily and quickly. Prerequisite: internet access. 2 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 292.  Internship in Health Education.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of health education.  1-18 credits.

Health Education 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in health education. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Health Education 301. Safety Education.  Concepts and theories of accident prevention, particularly as they relate to the use of the highways. 3 credits.

Health Education 302. Driver Education. Classroom instruction and supervised experience in teaching practice driving. Prerequisites: valid Virginia driver’s license and driving experience and HLTH 301. 3 credits.

Health Education 310. Environmental Health. Study of the environment as it relates to the total well being of the individual. Special emphasis is placed on the threats to human health as a result of environmental degradation. 3 credits.

Health Education 311, 312. Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses in health education per semester. 1-18 credits.

Health Education 313. Drugs and Human Behavior. An examination of drug use and abuse in today’s society. Emphasis is placed on prevention and strategies for the learner while providing accurate, up-to-date information concerning human biology, sociological principles, and the pharmacological nature of drugs. Prerequisites: BIOL 206, 207 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 315. Health Promotion Programming I.  This course focuses on the development of skills necessary to assess individual and community health needs and to plan effective health education programs.  Communicating health and health education concerns as well as acting as resources in health education are also addressed.  Prerequisites: HLTH 205, three HLTH electives and co-requisite: HLTH 375 or consent of instructor.  3 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 325.  Human Diseases.  A study of communicable and chronic diseases with regards to disease description, description, etiology, signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, treatment, prognosis and prevention.  Prerequisites: HLTH 205, BIOL 206 and 207 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

Health Education 335. Nutrition. This course examines the principles of normal human nutrition applied to various stages in life, especially as they relate to disease prevention, fitness, and weight control. Factors that influence human nutrition needs and eating patterns are also covered. Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and BIOL 207 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 340. Pharmacology.  The emphasis of this course is on legal and illegal drug use in the world today.  Topics will include indications, contraindications, and effects of commonly used non-prescription and prescription medicines, erogenic aids and the use of illegal substances in athletics, and neurophysiology and pharmacology as it relates to the effects of drugs on the body.  Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and CHEM 101 or 111. 2 credits.

Health Education 345. Selected Health Topics. An in-depth examination of timely health issues such as stress management, aging, and death and dying, which have physical, psychological and sociological implications for one’s overall health status. 3 credits.

Health Education 366. Public Health Issues. Identification and analysis of significant issues and problems which challenge the community’s health and the American health care system. 3 credits.**

HEALTH EDUCATION 375.  Management of Health Promotion Programs. This course examines the complete process of business planning in the health promotion setting.  Planning company events, job planning, hiring, budgeting, and reporting in a variety of diverse settings will be covered.  Prerequisites: HLTH 205, three HLTH electives and co-requisite: HLTH 315 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 390.  Directed or Independent Study.  Must be approved by the head of the department.  May be repeated as 391.  1-18 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 392.  Internship in Health Education.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of health education.  1-18 credits.

Health Education 405. Practicum. Supervised field experience in community health education setting. 1-3 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 415.  Health Promotion Programming II.  A sequel to HLTH 315, this course addresses health promotion program implementation and evaluation and examines the coordination of the provision of health education services.  Includes a practicum experience. Prerequisites:  HLTH 315 and HLTH 375. 4 credits.

Health Education 430. Women’s Health Issues. An examination of women’s health problems, their prevention and treatment. 3 credits.

Health Education 465. Comprehensive School Health Education. A study of comprehensive school health education with a focus on the teaching of health, N, K-12. It includes an examination of the components of CSHE, health education content, instructional methodology, resource materials (including audiovisual), evaluation of teaching, and computer assisted instruction. Provides a supervised practicum experience. Prerequisites: HLTH 205, HLTH 212, HLTH 313 and co-requisite: HLTH 335. 4 credits.

Health Education 490. Independent Study. Individualized study. 1-18 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 492.  Internship in Health Education.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of health education.  1-18 credits.

Health Education 495. Special Topics in Health. Selected topics in health which will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

HEALTH EDUCATION 498.  Honors Research in Health Education.  Students conduct research in health under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee.  May be repeated as 499.  3 credits. **

DANCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

General Education Course *

Courses cross-listed with PHED may be taken as a general education course for Goal 9 if registered under the PHED discipline and included in the approved list for Goal 9.

Dance 127 (PHYSICAL EDUCATION 127). Aerobic Dancing. An aerobic activity which combines different styles of music with vigorous jazz and modern dance movements to increase cardiorespiratory fitness. In addition to performing choreographed routines, students receive instruction in monitoring heart rate, injury prevention and a variety of other topics relevant to body/mind wellness.  1 credit.

Dance 128 (physical education 128). Beginning Social and Recreation Dance. Beginning instruction in the fundamental skills of square dance, folk dance, novelty and contemporary rhythms and in the social dance steps. 1 credit. *

Dance 129 (physical education 129). Beginning Ballet. Dance techniques that evolved over the past five centuries, combined with freer contemporary techniques. It includes barre work: plie, tendu, rond de jambe; center combinations: glissade, assemble; and combinations across the floor: saute and soutenu. 1 credit. *

Dance 130 (physical education 130). Beginning Jazz. Dance style based on a combination of African and European influences which has developed into the dance form seen on Broadway, film and television. Basic skills include stretching exercises for strength and flexibility, isolations and syncopated movements such as rib isolation, kicks, jump turns, and jazz runs. 1 credit.*

Dance 131 (Physical education 131). Beginning Modern Dance. Instruction in creative or interpretive dance utilizing specific stretching exercises and movement such as leaps, walks, bends, and turns. Emphasis on performing short dances and creating dances which can be performed with or without music. 1 credit. *

Dance 132. Advanced Modern Dance. High level of skill required in any one of three dance forms: ballet, jazz, or modern dance. Prerequisite: audition. 2 credits.

Dance 133 (physical education 133). Ballroom and Social Dance. Introduces the student to the steps, rhythms, and body positions that are fundamental to ballroom and social dances. Dances that will be taught include, but are not limited to the following: waltz, fox trot, cha-cha-cha, tango, rumba, shag, and electric slide. 1 credit. *

Dance 136 (physical education 136). International Folk Dance. Performance of dances from selected countries and early American culture, and an examination of the influence of the culture upon a country’s folk dance and costume. 1 credit. *

Dance 138. African Dance. African dance is a movement and technique course designed to explore the dances, rhythms, and chants of Africa. It also focuses on cultural enrichment, history, language and customs of the people of African ancestry. 1 credit.

Dance 228 (physical education 228). Intermediate Social and Recreation Dance. Advanced instruction in square dance, folk dance, novelty and contemporary rhythms and in the social dance steps. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 1 credit. *

Dance 229 (physical education 229). Intermediate Ballet. Emphasis on improving ballet skills and on allowing further opportunities for creating and learning dances. 1 credit. *

Dance 230 (physical education 230). Intermediate Jazz. Emphasis on improving jazz dance skills and on allowing further opportunities for creating and learning dances. 1 credit. *

Dance 231 (physical education 231). Intermediate Modern Dance. Emphasis on improving modern dance skills and on allowing further opportunities for creating and learning dances. 1 credit. *

Dance 232. Advanced Modern Dance. High level of skill required in any one of three dance forms: ballet, jazz, or modern dance. Prerequisite: audition. 2 credits.

Dance 267. Historical Perspectives of Dance. The growth and development of dance from its primitive beginnings to dance as a performing art (eg. ballet, modern dance). Study of the influence of society on modern dance, ballet, Broadway musicals, dance in the cinema, and dance for television. 4 credits (3 lecture hours, 1 lab hour). *

DANCE 292.  Internship in Dance.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of dance.  1-18 credits.

DANCE 295.  Special Topics in Dance.  Selected topics in dance.  The topics may vary from semester to semester.  May be repeated for credit when topics change.  1-3 credits.

Dance 332. Advanced Modern Dance. High level of skill required in any one of the three dance forms: ballet, jazz or modern dance. Prerequisite: Audition. 2 credits.

Dance 365. Dance Composition. Theory and practice in composition of solo and small group dances. An introductory course designed for those students interested in choreography. 3 credits.

Dance 432. Advanced Modern Dance. High level of skill required in any one of the three dance forms: ballet, jazz or modern dance. Prerequisite: Audition: 2 credits.

Dance 466. Teaching of Dance. Theory and practice in methods of teaching dance activities. 3 credits.

DANCE 495.  Special Topics in Dance.  Selected topics in dance.  The topics may vary from semester to semester.  May be repeated for credit when topics change.  1-3 credits.

ATHLETIC TRAINING PROGRAM COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Theory Courses

PHED 200. Introduction to Athletic Training. A survey of the area of Athletic Training and Sports Medicine and their professional applications. The course is designed as an initial experience for students considering a career in athletic training or physical therapy. Open to non-majors. 3 credits.

PHED 210. Clinical Methods in Athletic Training. Practical study of procedures for the evaluation and treatment of injuries within the athletic environment which includes classroom instruction in selected basic skills. The course also involves a directed observation experience requirement and participation in the student athletic trainer mentor program. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: PHED 200.

PHED 300. Injury Mechanism and Assessment I (Lower Extremity). An examination of the mechanism and pathology of injuries to the lower extremities. Detailed anatomy, biomechanics, evaluation, and immediate care is discussed. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHED 210, BIOL 207.

PHED 310. Injury Mechanism and Assessment II (Upper Extremity). An examination of the mechanism and pathology of injuries to the upper extremities. Detailed anatomy, biomechanics, evaluation, and immediate care is discussed. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHED 210, BIOL 207.

PHED 320. Therapeutic Modalities. The use of therapeutic modalities for the treatment of the injured athlete.  The course includes an introduction to the physiological principles and operational procedures of contemporary therapeutic modalities as they relate to the care and treatment of athletic injuries. 2 credits. Prerequisite: PHED 210. Corequisite: PHYS 102, PHED 325.

PHED 325. Therapeutic Exercise. An introduction to the concepts and principles of comprehensive rehabilitation programs including determination of therapeutic goals and objectives, selection of therapeutic exercises, methods of evaluating and recording rehabilitation progress, development of criteria for return to competition, and the physiological effects of tissue trauma/wound healing and inactivity/immobilization. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHED 210, 386, PHYS 101. Corequisite: PHED 320.

PHED 330. Injury Mechanism and Assessment III (Head, Neck, and Spine). An examination of the mechanism and pathology of injuries to the head, neck, and trunk. Detailed anatomy, biomechanics, evaluation, and immediate care is discussed. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHED 210, BIOL 207.

PHED 410. Athletic Training Administration. A practical approach to examination of the administration of athletic training programs including professional communications, the use of records and forms, budgeting, and facility design. 2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHED 330.**

PHED 420. Medical Aspects in Athletic Training.  A survey of clinical practices and other topics that relate Athletic Training to Sports Medicine.  Focus is on skin conditions, congenital abnormalities, disease, special populations, and environmental factors.  Epidemiology, counseling, and motor learning concepts are discussed. Prerequisite:  Upper division standing in the athletic training program.  2 credits.

Practicum courses

PHED 371. Practicum in Athletic Training I.  Supervised study and implementation of procedures for the evaluation and treatment of injuries as a student athletic trainer within the athletic environment. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the athletic training program or permission of the program director.

PHED 372. Practicum in Athletic Training II. A continuation of PHED 371 which includes supervised study and implementation of procedures for the evaluation and treatment of injuries as a student athletic trainer within the athletic environment. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the athletic training education program or permission of the program director.

PHED 471. Practicum in Athletic Training III.  Supervised clinical experience of procedures for the evaluation and treatment of athletic injuries as a student athletic trainer working with intercollegiate athletic teams. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the athletic training education program or permission of the program director.

PHED 472. Practicum in Athletic Training IV.  A continuation of PHED 471 which includes supervised clinical experience of procedures for the evaluation and treatment of athletic injuries as a student athletic trainer working with intercollegiate athletic teams. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Admission to the athletic training education program or permission of the program director.

PHED 473. Practicum in Athletic Training V.  Concentrated clinical experience in athletic training. Provides practical clinical experience in the care and treatment of athletic injuries as well as management and administration of the athletic training room.  1 credit. Prerequisites: PHED 320, 325.

PHED 492. Clinical Internship in Athletic Training. Supervised off-campus on-the-job learning experience designed to give students an opportunity to gain practical experience in a private clinic, educational setting, or sports organization which is involved in athletic health care. 12 credits. Prerequisites: Completion of all required courses.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

General Education Courses *
Writing Intensive Courses **

PHED 101. Total Fitness Through Exercise. Examination of issues dealing with physical and mental well-being, and participation in physical activities that can improve physical and mental well-being. 2 credits. *

Choose one of the following sections:

Total Fitness through Aerobic Exercise
Total Fitness through Aerobic Dance
Total Fitness through Cycling
Total Fitness through Multiple Activities
Total Fitness through Restricted Activity
Total Fitness through Swimming
Total Fitness through Water Aerobics
Total Fitness through Weight Training

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY CLASSES

To enroll in the beginning level the student should have little or no prior experience in the sport. Enrollment in the intermediate and advanced levels requires successful completion of a beginning class or meeting the prerequisites listed. The instructor reserves the right to evaluate the level of skill and make assignments as to the appropriate level.

Physical Education 102. Beginning Fencing. Instruction in guard position, foot-work, basic defense and offensive skills. Emphasis on fencing with “foil” and an overview of epee. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 103. Beginning Gymnastics. An introduction to beginning tumbling and apparatus skill. Emphasis is placed on correct technique and form. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 104. Beginning  Tennis.  Beginning instruction in the fundamental skills of forehand, backhand, serve and volley. Competitive play in women’s and men’s singles and doubles. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 105. Beginning  Lacrosse/Field Hockey. Instruction in the basic lacrosse skills of throwing, cradling, stick handling, loose ball pick-up, checking and goal play, and the field hockey skills of passing, dribbling, scoring, tackling and strategies of offensive and defensive play and interpretation of rules. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 106. Downhill Skiing. Instruction in the basic skills of traversing hill, snowplow, stopping and parallel turns. Fee charged. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 107. Beginning Bowling. Beginning instruction in the fundamentals of approach, release, arm swing, picking up spares, methods in scoring, rules, and etiquette on the lanes. Interclass competition with handicaps. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 108. Beginning Golf. Beginning instruction in techniques in putting, short approach shots, and the full swing with irons and woods. Course includes rules and etiquette of golf. Students play at the Longwood Golf Course. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 109. Beginning Volleyball. Instruction in the basic skills of serving, bump, dig, set and spike. Team defensive and offensive strategies and rules are included. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 110. Non-Swimming. Emphasis on physical and mental adjustment to the water through basic swimming and rescue skills. Prerequisites: uncomfortable in water and unable to swim one width of the pool. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 111. Beginning Swimming. Development of the five (5) basic strokes and basic rescue skills. Prerequisites: able to swim a width of the pool on the front and back, but uncomfortable in deep water. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 113. Beginning Synchronized Swimming. Instruction in rhythmic swimming, figures and sculling techniques. Performance of basic routine to music. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 114. Beginning Scuba Diving. Instruction in scuba diving skills in preparation for open water dives and certification. (Fee charged.) 1 credit. *

Physical Education 117. Beginning Canoeing. Basic river paddling skills in canoeing culminating in river trip(s) in class I and class II white water. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 120. Beginning Racquetball. Basic skills and rules of the sport applied to the games of singles, doubles, and 3 player racquetball. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 121. Beginning Archery. Instruction in the basic skills of bracing and embracing the bow, stance, grip, bow arm, nocking, drawing and anchoring, and aiming. Emphasis on fundamental skills and shooting form. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 122. Basketball. Instruction in the fundamentals of individual and team offensive and defensive skills and their applications to the game of basketball. The rules and basic officiating techniques are incorporated. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 123. Beginning Equitation. Beginning instruction in balance seat (hands, seat, feet and leg position). Proper method of groom, saddle, bridle, mount and dismount. Fee charged: $140.00. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 124. Camping Skills. Instruction in the basic camping skills such as tent pitching, firebuilding, site selection, meal planning, and trip planning. Students will plan and participate in a weekend camping experience. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 125. Beginning Archery and Badminton. Instruction of the basic skills relating to shooting the arrow and including good form. Instruction in the basic skills and techniques of badminton for singles, doubles and mixed doubles play. A semester course with half the semester in archery and half in badminton. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 126. Beginning Yoga. Instruction in physical (Hatha) postures with the incorporation of breath control and conscious relaxation. Emphasis on stress management, increased vitality and physical well-being. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 128. (DANCE 128). Beginning Social and Recreation Dance. Beginning instruction in the fundamental skills of square dance, folk dance, novelty and contemporary rhythms and in the social dance steps, rhumba, tango, samba, Lindy and fox trot. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 129 (DANCE 129). Beginning Ballet. Dance techniques that evolved over the past five centuries, combined with freer contemporary techniques. It includes barre work: plie, tendu, rond de jambe; center combinations: glissade, assemble; and combinations across the floor: saute and soutenu. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 130 (DANCE 130). Beginning Jazz. Dance style based on a combination of African and European influences which has developed into the dance form seen on Broadway, film and television. Basic skills include stretching exercises for strength and flexibility, isolations and syncopated movements such as rib isolation, kicks, jump turns, and jazz runs. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 131 (DANCE 131). Beginning Modern Dance. Instruction in creative or interpretive dance utilizing specific stretching exercises and movement such as leaps, walks, bends, and turns. Emphasis on performing short dances and creating dances which can be performed with or without music. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 133 (DANCE 133). Ballroom and Social Dance. Introduces the student to the steps, rhythms, and body positions that are fundamental to ballroom and social dances. Dances that will be taught include, but are not limited to the following: waltz, fox trot, cha-cha-cha, tango, rumba, shag, and electric slide. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 134. Track and Field. Instruction in basic track and field events, rules, workouts, and testing. 1 credit.

Physical Education 136 (DANCE 136). International Folk Dance. Performance of dances from selected countries and early American culture, and an examination of the influence of the culture upon a country’s folk dance and costume. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 137. Orienteering. Fundamental skills for traveling outdoors by map, compass, and observation, and an introduction to orienteering as a competitive cross country sport. 1 credit.*

Physical Education 140. Windsurfing. Introduction to windsurfing, including how to select equipment, rig and care for the board, points of sail, nomenclature and safety. Practical experience will include basic sailing skills—tacking, jibing, beating, reaching and running—and manipulating the rig in and out of water. Prerequisite: able to swim 100 yards. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 202. Intermediate Fencing.  Review of the basic skills. Emphasis on competitive fencing. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 204. Intermediate Tennis. Instruction in spin serve, lob and advanced drive placement. Emphasis on singles and doubles playing strategies. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 207. Intermediate Bowling. Emphasis on improving the basic skills and introduction of the hook delivery. Prerequisites: women—bowl an average of 120; men—bowl an average of 135. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 208. Intermediate Golf. Advanced instruction and practice with the full swing, short game and putting. Emphasis on advanced techniques and strategies related to ball control, sand shots, course management and psychological aspects of the game. Prerequisites: score below 90 on regulation 18 hole golf course or permission of instructor.  1 credit. *

Physical Education 209. Intermediate Volleyball. Review of the basic skills, offenses and defenses, strategies and rules. Instruction in intermediate to advance play and skills. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 211. Intermediate Swimming. Instruction designed to improve skill in mastery of five basic strokes, water safety skills and diving. Prerequisites: able to swim the length of the pool using three (3) different strokes. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 213. Intermediate Synchronized Swimming. Junior level synchronized swimming. Figures and choreography of a routine. Prerequisite: pass screening test. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 214. Advanced Open Scuba and Coral Reef Ecology. Held on Atlantic coral reefs leading to certification in Advanced Open Water (PADI) and Reef Ecology (YMCA). Prerequisite: ten (10) logged dives. (Fee charge.) 2 credits. *

Physical Education 217. Intermediate Canoeing. Development of river paddling skills such as peel out, surfing, ferring, and eddy turns on class II and class III white water. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 223. Intermediate Equitation. Instruction in the fundamentals of position and control with emphasis on security with the walk, trot, and canter. Basic hunter exercises of circles, turns, transition and cross-country riding. (Fee charge.) 1 credit. *

Physical Education 224. Outdoor Skills. Develop the technical skills and knowledge necessary for participation in back country trips, backpacking, rappelling, rock climbing, orienteering, equipment, clothing and first aid. Prerequisite: Beginning Camping or permission of instructor. 2 credits. *

Physical Education 228 (Dance 228). Intermediate Social and Recreation Dance. Advanced instruction in square dance, folk dance, novelty and contemporary rhythms and in the social dance steps. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 229 (Dance 229). Intermediate Ballet. Emphasis on improving ballet skills and on allowing further opportunities for creating and learning dances. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 230 (Dance 230). Intermediate Jazz. Emphasis on improving jazz dance skills and on allowing further opportunities for creating and learning dances. 1 credit. *

Physical Education 231 (Dance 231). Intermediate Modern Dance. Emphasis on improving modern dance skills and on allowing further opportunities for creating and learning dances. 1 credit. *

The following activity courses do not satisfy general education requirements, but may be taken as electives.

Physical Education 112. Water Aerobics. Exercising in the water to music for the purpose of improving muscular strength, flexibility, slimness and especially aerobic fitness as well as overall swimming ability. 1 credit.

Physical Education 116. Beginning Weight Training. An introductory course with emphasis on current issues dealing with weight training. The student will learn and workout with various weight training programs and apply the principles to his/her individual workouts. The course employs basic techniques in proper lifting with safety procedures involved. 1 credit.

Physical Education 118. Cycling. An introductory activity course with emphasis upon the history and development of the modern bicycle, selection and properly fitting the bicycle to the rider, development of good riding skills, maintenance of the bicycle and knowledge and adherence to correct safety procedures. The class emphasizes the fitness and leisure application of cycling. 1 credit.

Physical Education 127 (DANCE 127). Aerobic Dancing. An aerobic activity which combines different styles of music with vigorous jazz and modern dance movements to increase cardiorespiratory fitness. In addition to performing choreographed routines, students receive instruction in monitoring heart rate, injury prevention and a variety of other topics relevant to body/mind wellness. 1 credit.

Physical Education 141. Aerobic Fitness and Weight Control. Instruction and participation in aerobic exercises and their relationship to personal health, physical fitness and weight control. 1 credit.

Physical Education 212. Life-guarding and Emergency Water Safety. Instruction in lifesaving, first aid, CPR and lifeguard techniques leading to certification by the American Red Cross. Prerequisite: pass screening test. 2 credits.

Physical Education 216. Advanced Weight Training. A sequel to PHED 116, this course addresses the selection and implementation of advanced resistance training methods, focusing primarily on periodization programs.  Components include discussions of physiological principles and strength assessment as they relate to resistance training.  Prerequisites: PHED 116 and Biol 206 or permission of the instructor.  1 credit.

Physical Education 241. Advanced Aerobics. Instruction and participation in aerobic activities for students with good cardiovascular endurance. The emphasis is on long distance training and its effect on the body systems. 1 credit.

Physical Education 314. Fitness Swimming. Emphasis on competitive stroke with workouts designed for endurance and speed. 1 credit.

Physical Education 315. Water Safety Instructor. Methods of teaching and indepth analysis of swimming and personal safety skills leading to American Red Cross certification as a swimming instructor. Prerequisite: pass screening test. 2 credits.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY/THEORY COURSES

Physical Education 150. Fitness Education. Students in this course will examine issues relating to the teaching of physical fitness in the public schools and will participate in a wide range of fitness activities. These issues include the definition of physical fitness, fitness related to stages of development, and assessment of physical fitness. The main focus of the course, however, will be on the participation in fitness activities that are appropriate for use in educational settings, including aerobic dance. 1 credit.

Physical Education 175. Introduction to the Profession of Health and Physical Education. An introductory course designed to acquaint students with the health and physical education profession and allied fields. Students will be introduced to the health and physical education major at Longwood College and address specific major requirements. 1 credit.

Physical Education 275. Foundations of Physical Education And Sport. Survey of the historical philosophical bases of health and physical education. 3 credits. **

Physical Education 280. Motor Development. Movement changes throughout the lifespan and their implications for the curriculum in physical education. 3 credits.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 292.  Internship in Physical Education.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of physical education.  1-18 credits.

Physical Education 295. Special Topics in Physical Education. Selected topics in physical education which will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Physical Education 311, 312. Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses on physical education. 1-18 credits.

Physical Education 350. Skill Acquisition and Analysis I:  Team Sports. The purpose of this course is to provide learning experiences that will lead to the development of basic skills in team sports. In addition to skill acquisition, the course will focus on how to plan the four stages of games skill development through the use of extending, refining, and application tasks. An emphasis will be placed on the use of the games stages and movement framework as a guide for designing a variety of sport games experiences for the grades 5-12 student. 3 credits.

Physical Education 351. Skill Acquisition and Analysis II:  Educational Gymnastics and Dance. The purpose of this course is to provide learning experiences that will lead to the development of basic skills in educational gymnastics and dance. The course will focus on how to plan, develop and implement gymnastic movements, routines, dance steps and sequences. 3 credits.

Physical Education 352. Skill Acquisition and Analysis III: Lifetime Activities. The purpose of this course is to provide learning experiences that will lead to the development of fundamental skills used in lifetime activities and expertise in teaching. The course will focus on how to plan for the four stages of game skill development. 3 credits.

Physical Education 362. Organization and Administration of Intramurals. Practice and theory in organizing and administering intramurals. 3 credits.

Physical Education 364. Adapted Physical Education. Symptoms, causes and implications of various types of disabilities in relation to programming. Techniques in individual educational planning, activity adaptation and classroom organization. 3 credits.

Physical Education 380. Sport Pedagogy I: The Orientation to Teaching. The aim of this course is to orient the student to the teaching process, to increase the student’s understanding of the dimensions of effective teaching and to improve the student’s teaching skills and teaching strategies through practice under appropriate and controlled conditions. Prerequisite: PHED 280 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

Physical Education 381. Sport Pedagogy II:  An Analysis and Design of Motor Skills. The aim of this course is to assist the student in understanding the teaching-learning process and how to analyze and evaluate the instructional process which includes organizing the learning environment, presenting progressive learning tasks to students and providing learner feedback. Prerequisite: PHED 380.  Must have successfully completed PRAXIS. 3 credits.

Physical Education 382. Sport Pedagogy III: Curriculum Development and Application in Physical Education. This course is designed to orient the student in the process of curriculum construction in physical education for both the elementary and secondary school programs and to provide the student with experiences in teaching and in systematic observation and analysis of teaching. Prerequisites: PHED 380, 381. 3 credits.

Physical Education 385. Sport Psychology. An examination of the psychological dimensions which influence an athlete’s skill acquisition and performance in the competitive environment. 3 credits.

Physical Education 386. Biomechanics. The analysis of human movement with an emphasis on the knowledge and methods of mechanics applied to the structure and function of the human system. This course provides a knowledge base for a systematic analysis of motor skills and exercise regimes as well as practical experience in applying knowledge to the analysis of a performer and/or performance. Prerequisite: Biology 207 or permission from program coordinator. 4 credits. **

Physical Education 387. Physiology of Exercise. Lecture and laboratory experiences in the physiological responses of the body to the physical activity in everyday life and in sports. Prerequisites: Biology 206 and Biology 207. 4 credits.

Physical Education 389. Elementary School Health and Physical Education. Health and physical education principles and activities for the elementary school. For elementary majors. 3 credits.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 390.  Directed or Independent Study.  Must be approved by the head of the department.  May be repeated as 391.  1-18 credits.

Physical Education 392. Fitness Internship. An 8-10 week supervised field experience (minimum of 320 clock hours). The internship will take place during the summer between the junior and senior years. To be eligible for participation the student must be of junior standing, enrolled in the fitness specialist option and have an overall GPA of 2.0. Prerequisites: PHED 387, 486. 8 credits.

Physical Education 393, 394, 395, 396. Principles and Techniques of Officiating. The study of current roles and practices in the techniques of officiating. (393-Field Hockey; 394-Gymnastics; 395-Volleyball; 396-Basketball) 1 credit.

Physical Education 397. Mechanical and Physiological Principles of Sport and Exercise. The physiological responses of the body to exercise and the mechanical principles of human movement. Designed for students other than physical education majors; physical education majors may not take this course. 3 credits.

Physical education 398. Ethics in Sport and Physical Education. An examination of the basic philosophic issues concerning ethics and moral reasoning and how these issues relate to sport. Students will be encouraged to develop their ability to make informed ethical choices and decisions relating both to sport and to their own personal and professional lives. This course is designed for all students of any major Junior or Senior Status. 3 credits. *

Physical Education 399. Advanced Exercise Physiology. A study of the acute and chronic physiologic adaptations to exercise.  Emphasis is placed upon anaerobic and aerobic energy metabolism, energy support systems, and adaptations to training.  3 credits.

Physical Education 462. Organization and Administration of Health and Physical Education Programs. Administrative theory applicable to a variety of settings including education, industry, health clubs, Y’s. 3 credits. **

Physical Education 463. Assessment and Evaluation in Health and Physical Education. Contemporary practice and theory in assessment of performance in health and physical education in the NK-12 setting. This includes strategies for selection, administration, and evaluation of assessment tools in health-related fitness, skill and motor performance, the cognitive domain, measuring affective behavior, as well as grading performances. 3 credits.

Physical Education 470. Research in Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Methods, techniques, and application of the research process related to a variety of functions typically found in health, physical education, and recreation professions. Designed to acquaint students with practical and applicable tools emphasizing research methodology and elementary data treatment through practical experiences, including computer use. 3 credits.**

Physical Education 482. Directed Teaching in Elementary and Secondary Physical Education and Health. Students are placed in elementary and secondary schools where they are responsible for the planning and delivery of instruction in the areas of health and physical education. 50 percent of the experience is spent at the elementary level (k-6) and 50 percent at the secondary level (6-12). The experience is directed by a cooperating teacher and a Longwood College supervisor. 12 credits.

Physical Education 483. Seminar in Teaching. A seminar to examine the influence societal and educational factors have on education and teaching.  Topics will include the historical purposes of education, current issues influencing education, and ways in which physical education and health are influenced by these larger issues. 2 credits.**

Physical Education 485. Motor Learning and Control. Processes and conditions influencing the acquisition and performance of motor skills. 3 credits.

Physical Education 486, 487. Practicum. Supervised experience in one or more of the following areas of the professional curriculum: teaching, coaching, and fitness specialist. Credit & hours to be arranged. 6 credits maximum. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor.

Physical Education 488. Exercise Intervention in Disease. This course examines the impact of exercise on the disease process, focusing primarily on cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and to a lesser extent on pulmonary disease and osteoporosis.  Emphasis is placed on a review of epidemiological research and exercise/diet intervention studies. Prerequisites: PHED 386, 387, 486 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

Physical Education 490. Independent Study. Must be approved by the head of the department.  May be repeated.  1-18 credits.

Physical Education 492. Internship.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of physical education. 1-18 credits.

Physical Education 495. Special Topics in Physical Education. Selected topics in physical education which will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.  Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor.

Physical Education 496. Coaching Interscholastic and Intercollegiate Athletics. A seminar course to include the following topics: the role of athletics in the education setting, the organization and administration of athletics on the interscholastic and intercollegiate levels, the role of the teacher/coach, and special issues in athletics. 3 credits.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 497.  Special Projects  in Physical Education. Independent study and research projects for qualified students. 1-3 credits.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 498.  Honors Research in Physical Education.  Students conduct research in physical education under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee.  May be repeated as 499.  3 credits. **

RECREATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Writing Intensive Courses **

Recreation 110. Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation. History, philosophy, rationale for service and overview of the profession of therapeutic recreation; survey of disabilities, and overview of therapeutic recreation settings and employment opportunities. 3 credits.

Recreation 111. Introduction to Leisure Service Delivery. The history and development of the recreation profession, definitions of recreation, theories of play, and the role of recreation and leisure in society. Providers of leisure services and general operational aspects of various organizations and agencies are investigated. 3 credits.

RECREATION 115. Arthritis Aquatics Practicum.  A course designed to provide students with a practical experience in teaching aquatic exercise for individuals diagnosed with arthritis.  Topics include the meaning and types of arthritis, benefits of exercise, safety issues, and teaching older adults basic and endurance aquatic exercise. 1 credit.

Recreation 205. Recreation Leadership and Activity. The development of creative leadership skills, methods, and techniques that can be applied in various recreational settings through the use of social and informal recreational activities. 3 credits.

Recreation 206. Introduction to American Sign Language. A practical study of deaf culture and the history, origin and techniques of American Sign Language (ASL) with application in a variety of settings providing services to members of the deaf community. 3 credits.

Recreation 207. Intermediate American Sign Language. Provide students with additional American Sign Language structure, and sign language vocabulary. Emphasizes linguistic aspects of ASL, including classifiers, syntax, locatives, placement, and various sentence types. Develops skill in expressive/receptive use of language. Prerequisite: RECR 206 or CDIS 206. 3 credits.

Recreation 237. Experiential and Outdoor Education Programming. Demonstrate an understanding of the techniques and methods used in experiential education. Plan and organize an experiential education program for both an indoor and outdoor setting for different population groups. 3 credits.

Recreation 238. Outdoor Education in the Schools. Development of outdoor education theory and understanding of components and implementations of an outdoor education program in a K-12 curriculum. Utilization of outdoor skills to develop the ability to teach and broaden students’ physical, social, and cognitive skills important in the educational process. 3 credits.

RECREATION 292.  Internship in Recreation.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of recreation.  1-18 credits.

Recreation 295. Special Topics in Recreation. Selected topics in recreation which will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Recreation 300. Pre-Internship Seminar. Designed to prepare students for internship experiences. Includes emphasis on professional behavior, self-assessment strategies, identification of potential internship sites, goal setting, resume preparation, interview processes and internship site selection. 1 credit.

Recreation 301. Therapeutic Recreation in Mental Health Settings. An exploration of sociocultural and psychodynamic dimensions of mental health and mental illness and the preventative and restorative functions of therapeutic recreation and leisure education processes. Primary focus includes characteristics of mental health; recognition and amelioration of symptom and illness expressions; TR assessment and intervention strategies, and setting-related issues and terminology. 3 credits.

Recreation 303. Therapeutic Recreation and Persons with Physical Disabilities.  In-depth study of predominant physical disabilities and implications for therapeutic recreation intervention. Includes focus on specific rehabilitation and habilitation services, activities and technologies; over-view of competitive and recreational sport adaptations; legislation and safety issues; and recreation and support organizations for people who are physically challenged. 3 credits.

Recreation 304. Leisure and Aging. Focuses on the processes and theories of aging, including biological, psychological, sociological and multicultural aspects. Covers principles and practices related to program implementation and evaluation of leisure services in institutional and community settings. 3 credits.

Recreation 305. Concepts of Leisure. An analysis of various concepts and philosophies of leisure and their role in defining the framework, content and processes of leisure education for varied consumer groups. Leisure behavior and relevant theories (e.g., attribution and efficacy) will be explored and assessment strategies will be studied and employed. Course is open to non-majors. 3 credits.**

Recreation 308. Therapeutic Recreation in Clinical Settings. Analysis of current issues, trends and practices in clinical and health care systems and settings and their relationship to and impact in therapeutic recreation. Strong emphasis on clinical documentation; medical symbols and terminology; the therapeutic use of self in helping relationships, and comprehensive program planning. Prerequisite: RECR 370. 3 credits.

Recreation 310. Plan and Design of Recreation Areas. This course is designed to analyze the many elements of managing recreational resources. Topics to be discussed include indoor and outdoor facility usage, maintenance and operation, design, management application, and liability/risk issues. 3 credits.

Recreation 311, 312. Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses on recreation per semester. 1-18 credits.

RECREATION 320. Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation.  This course is designed to prepare therapeutic recreation students in the technical realm by identifying and applying the principles of planning, leading and evaluating therapeutic intervention (facilitation) techniques which are used to empower individuals with disabilities to overcome difficulties or obstacles. 3 credits.

RECREATION 340. Introduction to Outdoor Adventure Skills.  This course will address the basic skills in canoeing, rock climbing, and orienteering.  Students will learn the skills, techniques and safety factors involved in each activity and be able to transfer skills into practice.  3 credits.

Recreation 350. Ropes Course and Initiative Dynamics. Provides physical and mental challenges through adventure activities. Leadership, communication, decision-making and problem solving will be enhanced. The development of creativity, ingenuity, and trust are essential elements that will be experienced throughout the course. 2 credits.

Recreation 360. Therapeutic Recreation for Children with Illnesses and Disabilities. This course is designed to prepare TR students for work with children challenged by illnesses, disabilities or  environmental situations requiring particular sensitivity and specialized therapeutic interventions. Task analysis; behavior analysis and interventions, and social skill development are major components of the course. 3 credits.

Recreation 370. Program Planning and Development in Therapeutic Recreation.  Principles and practices in therapeutic recreation including systems analysis; assessment; treatment planning and documentation; program implementation and evaluation; philosophy of TR, and current trends and issues in the profession. Prerequisite: RECR 110 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

Recreation 375. Leadership Development through Wilderness Pursuits. Leadership development through a variety of outdoor experiences and situations. Demonstrations and practical applications of technical skills, problem solving, decision making, and group dynamics. Planning, implementation, and development of outdoor skills and knowledge for back-country travel. 3 credits.

RECREATION 390.  Directed or Independent Study.  Must be approved by the head of the department.  May be repeated as 391.  1-18 credits.

Recreation 392. Junior Internship. An 8-10 week supervised practicum in clinical, community or outdoor therapeutic recreation settings during the summer after completion of the junior year. Prerequisites: RECR 300 and 370 or permission of Program Coordinator. 2.0 overall GPA and 2.25 in major required. 6 credits.

Recreation 410. Supervision and Administration of Recreation. Application of management theory and techniques of leisure service delivery, including such areas as organization, supervision techniques, financing and budget, personnel, public relations, legal foundations and liability. 3 credits.

Recreation 420. Environmental Education Resources. This course is designed to explore and provide ways to sensitize human beings to the environment. Emphasis will be placed on examining a variety of ways to interpret the environment in order for people to develop environmental ethics and behaviors. Topics such as history and philosophy, environmental ethics, culture and environmental values and environmental education will be covered. Unique to this class will be the opportunity to apply class information to practical experience in teaching and the development of environmental projects. 3 credits.

Recreation 426. Ethical and Legal Issues in Health and Human Services. An introduction to ethical theories and principles; legal and liability concepts, and issues that impact and guide human service professions and their practitioners. Prerequisite: Recommend completion of one internship or practicum. 3 credits.*

Recreation 437. Group Dynamics.  Includes analyses of TRS group facilitation styles, skills and techniques. Content and exercises emphasize comprehension of small group behavior; group processes and dynamics; verbal and non-verbal communication, and effective problem-solving and decision-making. 3 credits.

Recreation 463. Special Projects in Therapeutic Recreation. Qualified students will pursue independent study projects and/or directed research under supervision of an instructor. Nature of study will depend on interests and needs of the students. 1-3 credits.

Recreation 470. Research in Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Methods, techniques, and application of the research process related to a variety of functions typically found in health, physical education, and recreation professions. Designed to acquaint students with practical and applicable tools emphasizing research methodology and elementary data treatment through practical experiences, including computer use. 3 credits. **

Recreation 487. Practicum Experience in Outdoor Education. Students will work in an outdoor education related position OR participate in an outdoor education program. Length and intensity of job and/or experience will directly relate to number of credits received (1-3). The experience will enable students to broaden their perspective about career choices and strengthen their knowledge, skills and experience in outdoor education. Students are expected to participate in an experience that will provide them an extended experience and exposure in an outdoor setting. 1-3 credits.

Recreation 490. Independent Study. Individualized study. 1-18 credits.

Recreation 492. Senior Internship. A 14 week educational work experience during the senior year designed to provide maximum opportunities for the student majoring in therapeutic recreation to participate in selected professional laboratory experiences. Spring only or permission from Program Coordinator.  12 credits.

Recreation 495. Special Topics in Recreation. Selected topics in recreation which will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Recreation 498. Honors Research in Recreation. Students conduct research in recreation under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee.  May be repeated as 499. 3 credits. **

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