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PHILOSOPHY PROGRAM 

Faculty

Eric Moore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Paul V. Moriarty, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

The minor in Philosophy requires 18 credit hours of work in Philosophy. Its objectives are as follows: to develop the skill to examine critically the philosophical problems which are basic and perennial for any serious-minded and reflective person; to begin to develop a personal philosophy or system of beliefs concerning those issues; to provide a background in the history of western thought; and to analyze problems and theories in other fields in both the humanities and sciences.

 

PHIL 200                Introduction to Philosophy/3 credits
Choose two of the following:
PHIL 210                Survey of Ancient Philosophy/3 credits
PHIL 211                Survey of Medieval Philosophy/3 credits

PHIL 212                Survey of Early Modern Philosophy/3 credits

PHIL 213                Survey of Nineteenth Century Philosophy/3 credits
Choose three credits from the following:
PHIL 210                Survey of Ancient Philosophy/3 credits
PHIL 305                Ethics Seminar/3 credits
PHIL 306                Ethics/1 credit
PHIL 307                Moral Issues and Perspectives/2 credits
PHIL 310                Business Ethics/3 credits
PHIL 315                Biomedical Ethics/3 credits
PHIL 316                Environmental Ethics/3 credits
Philosophy electives (two additional courses from Philosophy, POSC 331,
POSC 332).
TOTAL 18 credits
 

PHILOSOPHY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

General Education Courses *
Writing Intensive Course ** 

Philosophy 200. Introduction to Philosophy. Critical examination of basic problems of philosophy in various fields, e.g. ethics, religion, psychology. Attention to both critical analysis and systematic thinking. An introduction to ideas considered in most of the remaining courses in philosophy. Attention to the development of a system of beliefs in the student. Modern and contemporary readings. 3 credits. ** 

Philosophy 201. Introduction to Contemporary Moral Issues. An introduction to the philosophical analysis of today's moral problems. Emphasis on the detection of moral problems, moral reasoning, and resolution of moral dilemmas posed by contemporary issues such as capital punishment, suicide, war, famine relief, euthanasia, abortion, affirmative action, and environmental and sexual ethics. Discussion of case studies emphasized. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 210. Survey of Ancient Philosophy.  A survey of the development of western thought during the Hellenic and Hellenistic periods; that is, from Homer to Roman thought. Emphasis on the "golden age of Athens" and on Plato and Aristotle. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 211. Survey of Medieval Philosophy. A survey of the development of western thought during the Medieval and Renaissance periods. Emphasis on the Christian philosophies of Augustine and Aquinas and on the humanistic philosophies of the Italian renaissance. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 212. Survey of Early Modern Philosophy. A survey of the development of western thought from the 16th century through the 19th century. Emphasis on the philosophical traditions from Hobbes in the British Isles and from Descartes on the continent, especially on Descartes, Locke, and Hume. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 213. Survey of Nineteenth Century Philosophy. A survey of the development of western from Kant to the beginning of the 20th century. Emphasis on Kant's position as a solution to problems raised in the 18th century, and to the development of German philosophy in Schopenhauer, Hegel, and Marx. The foundations of existentialism. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 242. World Religions.  An investigation of the nature and development of religious practices and traditions in other cultures, their teachings, rituals, institutions and ethics. The course includes prehistoric religion, the major traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and some other traditions which have contributed to their development. This course is recommended for students in the sophomore level and above. 3 credits. * 

Philosophy 250. Themes in Biblical Literature. An introductory study of selected recurring themes in the history of salvation in both the Old and New Testaments. An historicist philosophy on these themes is developed. Readings from the Bible and from works written from the historicist point of view. 3 credits. 

PHILOSOPHY 292.  Internship in Philosophy.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of philosophy.  1-18 credits. 

Philosophy 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in Philosophy. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. Prerequisite none. 1-3 credits. 

Philosophy 300. Logic. The fundamentals of deduction and induction which aid the student in developing habits of valid thinking and in understanding the scientific method. Emphasis on deductive logic and on tools for analysis of issues in different fields of inquiry. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 305. Ethics Seminar. A critical examination of normative ethical theories and of how they may be employed to resolve representative current moral problems. Attention given to certain related metaethical issues such as freedom and determinism, relativism, and absolutism and the meaning and justification of ethical judgments. Modern and contemporary readings. 3 credits. * 

Philosophy 306. Ethics. An introduction to ethics designed to help the student to make informed, ethical choices and decisions on moral problems and to weigh the consequences of those choices. Emphasis on the detection of moral problems, the process of ethical reasoning, ethical theories and the process of resolution of moral dilemmas posed by contemporary moral issues. 1 credit. * 

Philosophy 307. Moral Issues and Perspectives. An introduction to the philosophical analysis of today’s moral problems and the “care and justice” perspectives in which such problems may be resolved. (Students may not receive credit for both PHIL 201 and 307). Prerequisite: PHIL 306. 2 credits. 

Philosophy 310. Business Ethics. A study of ethical theory and an application of its principles and concepts to the analysis and solution of cases of moral problems in business. Emphasis will be on detection of moral problems in business, on normative ethical theories, on such fundamental concepts as autonomy, responsibility and justice, and on the process of ethical reasoning required to resolve a variety of moral problems actually encountered in the business world. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 311, 312. Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses on Philosophy.  1-16 credits per semester. 

Philosophy 315. Biomedical Ethics. Ethical inquiry into the concepts of person, autonomy, rights, responsibility, and justice relevant to biomedicine and their application to issues of euthanasia, abortion, genetic control, the definition of death, allocation of scarce medical resources, experimentation with human beings, and intentional deception in biomedicine. 3 credits.* 

Philosophy 316. Environmental Ethics.  A study of how the principles of ethical theory can be applied to contemporary environmental controversies. The class will examine a variety of theoretical approaches to environmental ethics, comparing human-centered (anthropocentric), animal-centered (zoocentric), and nature-centered (biocentric) value systems. Students will study local, national, and global environmental issues including factory farming, pollution and pesticides, loss of biodiversity, habitat destruction, and global warming. 3 credits.* 

Philosophy 320. American Thought. A survey of the development of American philosophy from its colonial beginnings to the present. Emphasis on the development of native American pragmatism in Pierce, James and Dewey. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 350. Aesthetics. A study of theories of art and beauty, including the relation between beauty and the arts, the function and value of the arts in culture, and standards for criticism and judgments of beauty. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 355. Philosophy of Mind. A study of such leading theories as dualistic interactionism, behaviorism and materialism, which concern the nature of the person, self-knowledge, the relation to the mental and the physical and human action. Emphasis on theories of the self or person and on criteria for the evaluation thereof. Classical, modern, and contemporary sources. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 360. Philosophy of Religion. A critical examination of certain problems in religion, including the nature of religion, grounds for belief and disbelief in God, the varieties of religious experience and immortality. Classical, modern and contemporary sources. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 365. Philosophy of Science. An examination of such issues as the logic of scientific reasoning and method, the distinction between science and pseudoscience, the analysis of central concepts in science, especially causality, law and explanation, and finally, the relation of science and  values in our culture. Attention will be given to the development of a consistent point of  view on these issues. Examples will be drawn from a broad range of sciences, both natural and social. 3 credits. 

PHILOSOPHY 390.  Directed or Independent Study.  Must be approved by the head of the department.  May be repeated as 391.  1-18 credits. 

PHILOSOPHY 392.  Internship in Philosophy.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of philosophy.  1-18 credits. 

Philosophy 461. Seminar in Philosophy. An intensive study of one of the major philosophers emphasized in the introductory four-course sequence in the history of western philosophy. Lectures on the systematic position in general and student papers on particular topics on or about that position. Readings from major works of the philosopher chosen and from important critical secondary sources. Prerequisites: completion of the other specified required courses for either the major or minor programs in philosophy or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 490. Independent Study. A directed reading and/or research program on a topic or thinker selected by the student and approved by the director. 3 credits. 

Philosophy 492. Internship. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of philosophy. 1-18 credits. 

Philosophy 495. Special Topics. Selected topics in Philosophy. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisers. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits. 

PHILOSOPHY 498.  Honors Research in Philosophy.  Students conduct research in philosophy under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee.  May be repeated as 499.  3 credits.

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