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SOCIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

General Education Courses *
Writing Intensive Courses ** 

Sociology 101. Principles of Sociology. Principles of Sociology seeks to impart an analytical framework with which the student can better understand the relationship between individual and social structure. Theories of functionalism, conflict, symbolic interactionism, and socialization will be discussed. The concepts of normative culture, technology, demography, ethnocentrism, values, norms, institutions, status, role, bureaucracy, and stratification will be developed and applied to social institutions. These institutions will include: the formal organization, courtship, marriage and family, religion, health care service delivery, media, politics, military, and criminal justice. 3 credits. * 

Sociology 102. Contemporary Social Problems. Contemporary Social Problems examines problems confronted by humans as both creators and objects of society. Problems of family instability, health and disease, war, distribution of resources, substance abuse, gender role definition, prejudice, discrimination and institutional response to deviance will be addressed. Particular emphasis is given to how groups define, experience, and attempt to solve these social problems. Attention will also be given to a global perspective and how the concepts of fact, truth, right and wrong are socially constructed. 3 credits. * 

Sociology 185. Sociology of the South. This course provides a regional sociological focus by emphasizing the experiences and perspectives of women and minorities in Southern American historical development. The topics of racism, sexism, urbanization, and modernization in the transformation of the American South are examined in this course. 3 credits. 

Sociology 201. Issues in Criminal Justice. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to conduct a survey and analysis of the institutions of criminal justice and the actors therein. Topics that will be covered include: sociological notions of criminal justice; social research and criminal justice institutions; historical developments and evolution of criminal justice institutions; role and function of criminal justice institutions; criminal justice occupational subculture; and the nature of criminal justice authority as a social and legal construct. 3 credits. 

Sociology 205. Deviance. This course is an in-depth examination of deviant behavior, its social forms and functions. Societal response to deviance is examined to highlight norms, values and control mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on sociological theories that explain deviant behavior. Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. ** 

Sociology 220. Self in Society. The interplay of societal forces and self are examined in this course. Attention is given to such topics as: self in society and society in self; collective behavior; mass movements, public opinion, propaganda and the mass media; group processes; socialization and social psychological aspects of social structure. 3 credits. 

Sociology 222. Socialization: Sociology of Child Development. This course is designed to give students an understanding of the foundations and functions of the socialization process. Socialization is  examined from infancy through adolescence. Topics that will be explored include socialization theory, language acquisition, identity formation, agencies of socialization, and how socialization experiences differ by gender, race, and socioeconomic status. 3 credits. 

Sociology 232. Minority Groups: Race, Religion, Sex, and Majority and Minority Relationships.  This course provides a study of the sociological principles related to the understanding of majority-minority relationships and to the problems of those who are assigned minority status due to their race, religion, sex, sexual preference, or cultural heritage. Prerequisite: SOCL 101. 3 credits. 

Sociology 241. Marriage and the Family. The history of American families and contemporary family issues are analyzed using sociological theory and research. Topics that are covered include marriage, cohabitation, divorce, single parent families, blended families, the impact of race and gender norms, and socioeconomic status on family structure. 3 credits. ** 

SOCIOLOGY 292.  Internship in Sociology.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of sociology.  1-18 credits. 

Sociology 295. Special Topics. These courses are recommended when the student desires to pursue a specialized topic in depth. Students must have permission of department chair and instructor directing the course. Students' cumulative GPA must be 2.50 or higher to be eligible. 3 credits. 

Sociology 310. Complex Organizations. In this course students engage in a study of complex organizations such as private enterprises, voluntary associations, and governmental bureaucracies in terms of political-economic environment, formal and informal structure, technology, management ideologies, control and commitment of personnel, and impact on lives of individuals. Classical and recent theory and research are examined. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. ** 

Sociology 311, 312. Studies Abroad.  These courses are primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses on sociology. 1-18 credits. 

Sociology 320. Sociology of Education. Sociology of Education examines the structure and process of education in contemporary society.  The primary focus is on U.S. public education.  Topics include the contribution of sociology to understanding education and teaching; the relationship of education to other institutions such as the family, government, religion, and the economy; demographic changes that effect education; the effect of social class on student achievement and teaching; formal and informal positions, roles and processes in schools; and consideration of current issues such as school funding, compensatory and special education programs, race and gender issues, and educational reform movements.  Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or 102, or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Sociology 321 (ANTHROPOLOGY 321). Supernatural Belief Systems.  This course provides an investigation of the social aspects of religion, its forms of organization, and its relationships to other institutions. 3 credits. 

Sociology 325 (ANTHROPOLOGY 325). Women and Society.  In this course students study of women's history, roles, and contributions to society through readings in anthropology and sociology. The effects of gender, race and ethnicity in the lives of women are emphasized. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or 102. 3 credits. 

Sociology 326. The Sociology of the Civil Rights Movement. This course examines the social and intellectual presuppositions that led to the Civil Rights Movement. Included in the course is an examination of the different approaches to equality that have developed by noted black and white intellectuals including Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X. The impact of technological changes and the consequences of various Supreme Court decisions on the Civil Rights Movement also are discussed. Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology including SOCL 101 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Sociology 331. Social Gerontology. This course provides a comprehensive examination of social gerontology, with particular emphasis on the historical changes in the role of the elderly in society, future social and demographic trends, the contribution of sociological theories to understanding this group, and public policy implications. Also addressed are specific social problems associated with aging (poverty, loneliness, suicide). Prerequisite: SOCL 101. 3 credits. 

Sociology 332. Sociology of Dying and Death. The course explores social processes attendant to dying and death, including those that define the role processes of dying and the status of being dead. The effects of disruption in dyads, families, and larger social organizations will be studied. The thesis that emotions are socially and culturally mediated will be examined. Other topics include cross-cultural causes of death, demography of death, care systems which attend dying, the concept and treatment of pain, funeral and body dispositions, and medical and legal ethics. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or 102. 3 credits. 

Sociology 335. Juvenile Delinquency. In this course students explore the diversity of delinquent behavior, the process of becoming delinquent, the importance of legislation, the law enforcement apparatus, the courts, and juvenile correctional facilities in the development of delinquent identities. 3 credits. 

Sociology 342. Penology. The theory and practice of prison management and criminal rehabilitation are examined in this course. The overarching concepts of this course are: the functions of punishment and rehabilitation; historical and cross-cultural approaches to punishment, deterrence, and rehabilitation; current theories and practices; and future possibilities. The course is intended for those interested in the general study of sociology and criminal justice, prison administration, and complex organizations. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Sociology 345. Social Research. In this course students learn the logical basis for conceptualization and research in sociology. Research design, concept formation, data collection, data reduction, data analysis, and data interpretation are studied. Emphasis is placed on the application of methods to various aspects of research projects undertaken by members of the class. Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester. Required for sociology majors. 3 credits. ** 

Sociology 346. Basic Statistics. Computer application of quantitative and statistical techniques to sociological data. Emphasis on questionnaire construction, coding, sampling, building and maintaining data sets, probability, statistical distributions, hypothesis testing, and theoretical modeling. Students are required to become proficient in the use of a statistical software package. Offered spring semester. Required for sociology majors. Prerequisite: SOCL 345. 3 credits. 

Sociology 350. Power and Privilege: Social Stratification. This course is a study of how power, wealth, and prestige are built into the structure of society. The consequences of social ranking, class identification, and opportunities for social mobility are also explored. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Sociology 351. Sociology of Domestic Violence. This course is designed to familiarize students with the sociological literature on family violence. Topics which will be explored include the social causes and consequences of spouse abuse, marital rape, child abuse (physical and sexual) and parent abuse, as well as the response of the criminal justice system to and the societal perceptions of such violence. Emphasis will be on synthesizing and critiquing domestic violence theories and research. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or 102. 3 credits. 

Sociology 355 (ANTHROPOLOGY 355). The Community. Students review theories of community and analyze representative community studies. This course is limited to juniors and seniors except by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology or anthropology. 3 credits. 

Sociology 360. Urban Sociology.  This course provides an examination of city life, its problems and prospects. The nature of organization, bureaucratization, and massification including social, economic, and political features of metropolitan areas are studied. Urban lifestyles and dilemmas are also discussed. Prerequisite: SOCL 101. 3 credits. 

Sociology 370. Medical Sociology. Students study sociocultural factors that influence health, health care and illness in addition to an analysis of health care services, hospital organization, roles and role relationships in the health care setting and the processes of socialization of health care personnel and patients. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Sociology 375. Criminology. This course provides an analysis of the nature, extent and distribution of crime, emphasizing theories of and research on causation, prevention, treatment, and other public policy efforts. Prerequisite: Sociology 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Sociology 376. Sociology of Law.  In this course students learn the relationship between law and social structure. They further study the processes of law creation, interpretation, enforcement and modification, and examine police, judicial and jury behavior as well as analyze the legal profession itself. 3 credits. 

Sociology 381, 382. Topical Seminars. These courses are advanced seminars for sociology majors and non-majors interested in sociology. These seminars are designed to permit small groups of qualified students to pursue specialized topics in sociology, as listed below. Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology, including SOCL 101 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Collective Behavior and Social Movements. In this course, students study social behavior that is guided by nontraditional norms and is less structured than more traditional behaviors.  The topics of crowds, cults, riots, rebellions, social change movements, and revolutions are explored. 

Small Groups. In this course, students gain a sociological appreciation of units consisting of two or more members engaged in meaningful contact such as families, work groups, therapeutic associations, athletic teams, and peer groupings. 

Sociology of Mass Communication. This course is an exploration of the structure of media industries (press, radio, television, and advertising), their impact on audiences, mass culture, and specific public issues such as  violence and politics. 

Sociology of Sport and Leisure.  This course provides an analysis of sport and leisure as changing social institutions emphasizing sex and ethnic status, collegiate sport, professionalization, law and shifting social values. 

Sociology 383. Occupational and Career Sociology. An overview of job and career opportunities in sociology. Course topics include applying for jobs, planning for graduate study, and development of a resume. 1 credit. 

Sociology 389. Sociological Theory. This course is an examination of the major theoretical positions in classical and current sociology. Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester. Required for sociology majors. 3 credits. 

SOCIOLOGY 390.  Directed or Independent Study.  Must be approved by the head of the department.  May be repeated as 391.  1-18 credits. 

SOCIOLOGY 392.  Internship in Sociology.  A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of sociology.  1-18 credits. 

Sociology 406. Sociology of Policing. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to conduct a critical analysis of the institutions of policing and the social actors therein. Topics that will be covered include: sociological notions of policing; social research and policing; historical developments and evolution of policing institutions; police roles and functions; police authority; control of the police; police deviance; and the emergent police occupational subculture. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Sociology 423. Women and Crime. This course will integrate theoretical and empirical information on a wide variety of issues related to justice and women and issues surrounding women as criminal justice practitioners. Issues related to social control and gender, theoretical perspectives and empirical research on criminal offenders, the place of women, and the victimization of women will be examined. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 credits. ** 

Sociology 455 (ANTHROPOLOGY 455). Social Change. In this course students study significant alterations in the organization of society and in patterns of values, norms, and behavior over time. The social and economic development associated with modernization and industrialization and various sources of change found in technology, social structure, population, the environment, and cultural innovation are explored. 3 credits. 

Sociology 461. Senior Seminar in Sociology.  This course is a seminar for the senior sociology major, designed to integrate knowledge of specific subfields into a comprehensive view of sociology and its role in relation to other sciences. Open only to senior sociology majors. 3 credits. * ** 

Sociology 490. Independent Study. Individualized study. 1-18 credits. 

Sociology 492. Internship in Sociology. This course provides direct student learning in applied settings that permits a practiced supervised experience. Students learn through performance in meaningful tasks in a variety of social environments. Prerequisite: 18 hours of sociology. Studentsí cumulative GPA must be 2.50 or above to be eligible for internship. Must be arranged at least one semester in advance with chair of department. May be repeated in subsequent semesters. Variable credit; no more than 15 total credits may be earned. 3-15 credits. 

Sociology 495. Special Topics. These courses are recommended when the student desires to pursue a specialized topic in depth. Students must have permission of department chair and instructor directing the course. Students' cumulative GPA must be 2.50 or higher to be eligible. 3 credits. 

Sociology 496. Professional Study in Criminal Justice. This course provides students with the opportunity to apply rigorous theoretical and methodological considerations and analysis to the practical training and experience gained in acquiring professional accreditation within the criminal justice profession. Accumulated GPA 2.50 or above and permission of the department chair, arranged at least one semester in advance. Prerequisites: 18 hours of sociology courses. Sociology seniors only. 3-15 credits. 

SOCIOLOGY 498.  Honors Research in Sociology.  Students conduct research in sociology under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee.  May be repeated as 499.  3 credits.

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