Navigation Menu
  Longwood University Undergraduate Catalog 2004 - 2005

Longwood Rotunda Symbol

 

Student Affairs

STUDENT DEVELOPMENT GOALS

Longwood’s six broad student development goals reflect the institution’s commitment to students’ intellectual, social, and personal development, as well as career preparation. They also emphasize students’ involvement in shaping the quality of their experiences here, and finding meaning in their own values and directions.


Intellectual Goals:

1. Mastery of a Broad Body of Knowledge in the liberal arts and sciences, so you can see things in perspective, appreciate and enjoy artistic expression, and critically, creatively, and logically respond to the complex world around you.

2. Mastery of a Specialized Body of Knowledge, so you will have the expertise to be competitive and successful in your chosen career.

Personal Goals:

3. A Sense of Personal Direction, so you can plan your future wisely and with honor, acquiring self-understanding, self-confidence, and a meaningful philosophy of life.

4. A Balanced and Healthy Lifestyle, which means making responsible choices related to values, friends, family, work, recreation, and life-long education.

Social Goals:

5. Interpersonal Effectiveness and an appreciation of diversity and differences, so you can establish genuine, trusting, and honorable relationships within the broad family of humanity.

6. Responsible Citizenship, so you can do your best in ways uniquely your own and have the motivation to contribute to a better life for all through community participation and leadership.

STUDENT DEVELOPMENT AT LONGWOOD

The Longwood Board of Visitors endorsed student development, as expressed in the student goals, as a focus for program planning, design and implementation; as a policy pertinent to all programs and procedures; and as a concept, focus, and direction for programs and procedures. The Board endorsed the following:

"Student Development Orientation embraces the Longwood student development goals, as well as each student’s opportunity to assess his/her developmental needs, pursue goals and experiences to fulfill those needs, design and implement progress intended to foster growth, evaluate achievement, and record this attainment. The student development policy will give direction, shape and focus to student affairs programs and procedures, and it will assert Longwood’s focus on the student as an integrated person, both personally and intellectually."

VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS

The Vice President for Student Affairs promotes student learning and accountability in each Student Affairs program and service. Each Student Affairs program implements a student learning plan that focuses on learning outcomes with emphasis on participation, diversity, creativity, integrity, and commitment. Student Affairs programs and services include: Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Campus Recreation, Career Services and Center for Volunteer/Service-Learning, Counseling Center, Disability Support Services, Fraternity and Sorority Advising, Leadership and New Student Programs, Multicultural Affairs, Residential and Commuter Life, Student Health and Wellness Center, and Student Union and Activities.

Programs and Services

ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER

The mission of the Academic Support Center is to provide appropriate academic assistance and support to Longwood students to enable them to achieve their greatest educational potential.

The Academic Support Center fulfills its mission by providing group and individual content area tutoring, writing lab tutoring, reference materials, study materials, alternative textbooks, personal exploration materials, and computer tutorials. The staff of the Academic Support Center will also provide periodic presentations on a variety of topics such as time management, note-taking skills, test-taking skills, grade point average calculations, academic regulations such as probation and suspension, and other relevant topics.

CAMPUS POLICE

Campus Police, located in the Graham building, has the responsibility of law enforcement, security, and parking enforcement. Officers are also available to escort students, faculty, and staff to/from their vehicles in the evening. Arrangements are made by calling extension 2091.

PARKING

On-campus parking is available to students, faculty, and staff by permit only. Although the institution tries to provide ample parking, it cannot guarantee a space for every student wishing to have a vehicle on campus. Call Parking Registration at extension 2660 for information. The institution is not liable for theft from, or vandalism of, vehicles parked on the campus.

CAMPUS RECREATION

All students taking at least six (6) credits, and all faculty and staff, are eligible for participation in activities sponsored by the Department of Campus Recreation. These activities include Aerobic Fitness classes and Intramural Sports.

Leagues and tournaments are conducted in various activities. Examples include softball, bowling, sand volleyball, indoor soccer, 6-on-6 volleyball, billiards, air hockey, basketball, wiffleball, ping pong, darts, flag football, coed volleyball, coed softball, 2-on-2 sand volleyball, and tennis singles. Due to the varying skill levels in many of the team sports, there are A and B leagues for different competition levels.

The racquetball courts, weight room, outdoor basketball courts, outdoor volleyball courts, tennis courts, gymnasiums, swimming pools, and fields are open for free play during specified times. Students, faculty, and staff must show a valid Longwood ID to gain access to these facilities and to check out equipment.

The Department of Campus Recreation also oversees Club Sports. These sports include: men’s and women’s rugby, the equestrian program, martial arts, cycling, roller hockey, and color guard.

CAREER CENTER

Planning for life after Longwood should be an integral part of your college experience. The Career Center assists students with career planning through assessments, individual appointments, workshops, and resources on the Career Center website and in the Career Library.

We link students with volunteer service opportunities, full- and part-time jobs, internships and graduate school programs through online databases and by forming partnerships with alumni and faculty, as well as with employers through job fairs and on-campus recruiting.

Visit the Career Center website for a complete list of resources, workshops, fairs, and campus recruiting at www.longwood.edu/careerl.

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT

The Work Experience Program, under the Career Center, is a student employment activity designed to help students finance their education, recognize work experience as a valid career exploration tool, and increase their marketability upon graduation. Student Employment offers many advantages to students and to the community.

There are approximately 700 students employed through Longwood’s Work Experience Program in the library, offices, laboratories, computer center, academic departments, athletic facilities, and other areas. The Student Employment Office maintains job listings of positions on and off-campus. Incoming freshmen are assigned positions in the food services area. After fulfilling this "first-year requirement" students may seek positions related to areas of interest or preference.

Longwood’s Work Experience includes the following programs:

Federal Work-Study: designed for those students who have demonstrated financial need and have been awarded work-study as part of their financial aid package.

College Work-Study: institutionally funded and administered parallel to the federal program. This program is not need-based and is open to all full-time students.

Community Service: federal program developed for off-campus employment opportunities, with primary goal being to encourage students to participate in community service activities.

The usual workload for a student is 8-12 hours a week. Work hours are scheduled around classes.

Work Experience students are paid an hourly wage. The current rate is $5.15 per hour. There are no fringe benefits such as paid sick leave, vacation or holiday pay, or paid lunch periods. Students are subject to federal and state income taxes. Class schedules, department needs, available funding , etc. will determine the actual earnings.

Students are encouraged to explore employment opportunities through the Student Employment Office located in Lancaster building. Additional information at www.longwood.edu/workstudy.

COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING

The Center for Volunteer, Service-Learning, as part of the Career Center, provides volunteer and service-learning placements in Farmville and the surrounding communities. The purpose of the Center is to positively affect the Longwood community by promoting and enhancing campus-based community service and service-learning in support of the Citizen Leader concept: developing citizen leaders for the common good of society.

Volunteers give of their time and abilities, independently or with student groups, to help local service agencies that have requested assistance. Students have the opportunity to:

further their commitment to social and civic responsibility, engage in responsible and challenging actions for the common good, contribute to the quality of life of those whose resources are limited, explore and gain an increased sense of self-understanding, be involved in active experiential learning, collaborate with diverse populations, make genuine and active commitments with local agencies, engage in responsible and challenging actions for the common good, gain transferable skills for the workplace, articulate learning goals and outcomes, and apply theories learned in the classroom.

Structured reflection sessions are designed to promote student learning as well as career and personal development.

COUNSELING CENTER

The Counseling Center provides confidential counseling to any student experiencing psychological, social, behavioral, or academic difficulties. Counseling programs and services are offered to help students to live effective, responsible, and satisfying lives and to contribute to the learning that will encourage them to be "citizen leaders for the common good." Through counseling, students learn to better understand themselves, make healthy decisions, develop skills, solve problems that are difficult to resolve alone, and follow-through with personal and academic goals. Counseling Center services include: Individual Counseling, Support Groups, Workshops, Crisis Intervention, Consultation, Graduate Practicum Site, and Undergraduate Internship Site.

DINING SERVICES

Longwood University Dining Services are an integral part of campus life. Residential students are required to participate in the community-dining program by purchasing a 14-meal plan with $150 bonus dollars; a 15-meal plan or a 19-meal plan; or a block 150-meal plan plus $75 bonus dollars. There are two full-service dining facilities for students. Our state-of-the-art Dining Hall offers a variety of choices for every need. Traditional meals, deli bars, pizza and pasta, grill, and "meals to go" are available. The Lancer Cafe in the Lankford Student Union features Longwood’s very own Chick-fil-A, Bena Pizzeria, Tortillas Express, Freshen’s Yogurt and Smoothies, and Java City Specialty Coffee Drinks. Commuter students are welcome to participate in any of the operations by purchasing a meal plan; a commuter 5-Meal+50 Bonus Dollars; or by joining the Longwood Dollars declining balance program. Longwood Dollars is a pre-paid charge account where purchases are deducted from the account using the I.D. card. Longwood Dollars can be used at any dining facility.

DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES

The Office of Disability Support Services, in compliance with all state and federal legislation such as the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act pf 1973, will provide reasonable and appropriate accommodations when a request is made.

The mission of the Office of Disability Support Services is to assist in creating an accessible community where students with disabilities have an equal opportunity to fully participate in all aspects of the educational environment. Disability Support Services cooperates with students, faculty, and staff to promote students' independence and to ensure recognition of their abilities, not disabilities.

Reasonable accommodations are made on an individual and semester basis. Students must provide appropriate and current documentation of a disability and request accommodations and services. Eligibility is determined based on documentation. Accommodations such as priority registration, special housing, note takers, adaptive format materials, computer software, extended time on test, non-distracted testing sites, tutors, and sign language interpreters are possible accommodations. Services and accomodations are also available for family members and others visiting Longwood for special occasions.

HONOR and JUDICIAL PROGRAMS

The Longwood University Honor and Judicial System contributes to and supports the overall mission of Longwood by educating citizen leaders dedicated to the common good by providing students with the knowledge, skill, and wisdom they need to contribute to society. Our conduct standards are designed to ensure each student’s freedom to learn while protecting the fundamental rights of others. This system consists of Honor, Judicial, and Greek Judicial systems, and is administered by the Vice President for Student Affairs, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, and the Office of Honor and Judicial Programs. The overriding goal of all three systems is to educate students and organizations about their responsibilities as members of the Longwood University academic community. These three systems seek to promote responsible and honorable citizenship, appropriate behavior, and self-discipline through enforcement of the Code of Conduct Standards and Regulations. All students, groups, and organizations are expected to abide by these standards, conduct themselves with honor and integrity, and demonstrate respect for others to live, study, teach, learn, and work in a campus community dedicated to academic achievement, service, and a strong quality of life. Those found in violation of the Code of Conduct will, through appropriate sanctioning, be held accountable for their actions and given the opportunity to redirect their behavior in a manner consistent with the educational mission and values of the University.

LONGWOOD’S HONOR SYSTEM

A strong tradition of honor is fundamental to the quality of living and learning in the Longwood community. The Honor System was founded in 1910, and its purpose is to create and sustain a community in which all persons are treated with trust, respect, and dignity. Longwood affirms the value and necessity of integrity in all intellectual community endeavors. Students are expected to assume full responsibility for their actions and to refrain from lying, cheating, stealing, and plagiarism.

Upon entering Longwood, students sign the Honor Pledge:

I, ________________________________, having a clear understanding of the basis and spirit of the Honor Code created and accepted by the student body of Longwood, Farmville, Virginia, pledge myself to govern my life at Longwood according to its standards and to accept my responsibility for helping others to do so, and with sensitive regard for my institution, to live by the Honor Code at all times and to see that others do likewise.

LEADERSHIP AND NEW STUDENT PROGRAMS

The Office of Leadership and New Student Programs provides a variety of programs designed to help new students make a successful transition to Longwood. These programs begin the summer before a student enters Longwood and continue throughout a student’s first semester. All programs designed for new students engage specially trained upper division students who help ensure a new student’s transition to Longwood is positive.

The first program offered is PREVIEW, a summer orientation program for first-year students, transfer students, and their parents or guardians. PREVIEW provides opportunities for students to get help with advising and registration; to become acquainted with the campus; and to meet fellow students, faculty, and staff.

During New Lancer Days in August, new students continue their orientation to Longwood as they learn about their academic major, the Honor System, personal responsibility, and campus resources and services. Starting a few days before classes begin, New Lancer Days also offers special programs for commuter, minority, and transfer students.

For those students entering in the spring semester, a comprehensive program featuring essential academic and student life information is offered in January.

The Office of Leadership and New Student Programs also provides a variety of leadership programs open to all members of the Longwood community. The following list provides a more detailed description of each program:

· New Student Leadership Program (NSLP): During NSLP students spend time experiencing activities designed to explore different leadership styles. During this program they will spend time with experienced student leaders participating in a variety of outdoor adventures.

· Citizen Leader Day: During this one-day program participants engage in interactive activities focusing on vision, trust, participation, active learning, creativity, diversity, integrity, and communication. This event is open to all members of the Longwood community and contains a service-learning component.

· Mountain Lake Leadership Conference: This conference is an opportunity to expand student knowledge on leadership theory and to offer practical experiences through guest speakers, discussions, workshops, and experiential activities. This conference provides an opportunity to reflect on Longwood and strengthen new and old friendships.

· Women’s and Men’s Leadership Symposium: During this annual symposium Longwood University and Hampden-Sydney College work together to create an opportunity for students to address general issues of leadership while specifically exploring gender issues. Guest speakers, discussions, and workshop are all included in the symposium.

MULTICULTURAL AFFAIRS

The Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA) is committed to enhancing and maintaining a culturally diverse and pluralistic academic community. An equal concern is to ensure that women and individuals from under-represented groups have opportunities to develop their potential both academically and socially. In order to create a campus of difference, the office works collaboratively to build an inclusive intercultural campus community and to prepare future citizen leaders to contribute to the common good.

The Director of Multicultural Affairs also serves as the Advisor to Incoming International Students and strives to provide a welcoming environment for international students by offering timely and pertinent information and counsel pertaining to immigration regulations and procedures. The office initiates services to make international students feel welcome and to enrich their educational and academic stay at the University and in the United States. A primary concern for the office is to insure that student support services, academic support services, and co-curricular programs meet the needs of a diverse and international student body.

The Office of Multicultural Affairs:

· Seeks partners who are willing to assist with advancing our campus community’s discussion of diversity, interculturalism, and pluralism.

· Seeks to frame intercultural dialogues with students that are collaborative, inclusive, and interdisciplinary.

· Seeks to encourage the campus community to take ownership for advancing pluralism through collaborative and intentional actions in its curricular and co-curricular learning environments.

· Seeks to work with students and others to create learning opportunities that encourage people to leave their comfort zones and to engage in discussions of both difference and similarities across cultures.

· Designs the new student orientation program for incoming international students.

· Serves as a point of contact for international student concerns and identifies appropriate resources to improve the quality of the campus experience

· Functions as a point of contact between the institution and the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the Department of States related to immigration issues (SEVIS and ISEA).

· Collaborates with University stakeholders to identify and implement changes to current policies and practices in order to improve the climate for diverse populations both domestic and international.

The Office of Multicultural Affairs, located in Lancaster 121, assists all students (regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, disability, etc.).

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS AND CHURCHES

As part of their education and experience at Longwood, students refine ideals and values, and connect these values with personal and academic goals. The Farmville churches value students, and many sponsor groups and activities designed to meet the spiritual interests of students. Students are encouraged to participate in the religious life of the community.

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMUTER LIFE

The Longwood University residential and commuter life programs are designed and managed to contribute to student learning and development. Longwood recognizes that the residential experience is a significant part of our mission. We strive for the development of citizen leaders who are prepared to make positive contributions to the common good of society. Each residence hall floor is a learning community where students focus on acquiring self-knowledge, self-confidence, and a sense of self-worth. These meaningful learning environments challenge and support students as they collaborate to foster patience, tolerance, empathy, responsibility, interpersonal competence, and a sense of academic inquiry. With these objectives in mind, students are expected to live in the residence halls as part of their undergraduate experience, unless they choose to live with their parents. Senior level students are encouraged to take advantage of the senior off-campus privilege. An explanation of the exception is outlined in the Longwood Student Handbook.

FIRST YEAR STUDENT EXPERIENCE: STUDENT SUCCESS

The foundation for developing responsible students and citizens is laid in purposeful and intentional work with first year students. Housed predominately together in two living areas, first year students are oriented and connected to the academic community through the Longwood Seminar. Likewise, students begin the process of community development on their residence floor and within the larger hall community. Through formal and informal social and educational activities under the direction of the Resident Assistants (students) and live-in professional staff, new students quickly become an integral part of the educational community.

HOUSING FOR FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

First year students are housed in Cox, Curry, Wheeler, and the Colonnades (Tabb, and South Ruffner). Curry and South Ruffner are air-conditioned. Curry has predominately suite style rooms (two or three rooms sharing an adjoining bathroom). Curry, Tabb, and South Ruffner rooms offer single, double and triple occupancy options. Tabb and South Ruffner Halls have community shower/bathroom facilities located at the end of the hallways. Wheeler provides an all female living option in double occupancy suites. ARC (Academic Residence Community) houses the Honors program providing double occupancy suites for first year honors students. Cox provides double occupancy suites. Study and social lounge areas are provided in all of these buildings. All first-year residential spaces are alcohol and smoke free.

UPPER DIVISION AND TRANSFER STUDENT HOUSING

Our continuing commitment to the development of citizen leaders is a mark of our upper division and transfer living options. ARC (Academic Residence Community), Frazer, Cox, the Cunninghams, Stubbs, French, South Tabb and Wheeler Halls house upper division and transfer students. ARC requires a special application process and a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA. ARC and Frazer are air-conditioned. Stubbs is all female and houses the sorority chapters. All of these halls are predominately suite style living. The upper division halls feature a variety of special interest living options including the Honors Hall, International Studies House (ISH), Globe (Theater Majors), and Greek organizations. Each one provides unique opportunities for students to incorporate their academic and personal interests into the residential experience. All Longwood-managed housing is smoke-free.

COMMUTER STUDENTS

The institution recognizes the needs of commuter students and appreciates the unique role commuter students play in enhancing Longwood’s educational mission and the partnership between Longwood and the Southside Virginia communities. There are over 1000 commuters at Longwood--more than half live outside the Farmville area.

Services provided for commuters include designated parking areas and a Commuter Lounge in Lankford, which has cooking facilities, lockers, messaging facilities, computers, telephone and institution/community information designed for the unique needs of commuters. Longwood considers students living off of the campus to be commuter students. Thus, whether students commute by walking from an apartment or by driving from a community outside of Farmville, they are commuters. The Commuter Student Association, governed by a council of students, meets on a weekly basis to plan social and informational events and represent the needs, interests, and concerns of the large and diverse commuter constituency. All commuters are automatically members of this organization.

STAFF AND PROGRAMS

Full-time, live-in, professional Residence Education Coordinator (REC) staff implement the residence education program in each hall. Six RECs, along with undergraduate Resident Assistants (RAs), provide leadership in each residential community to stimulate and develop connections between academic and social interests among students through structured and unstructured activities.

Student responsibility for behavior, community, activity, and learning is encouraged as students learn the responsibilities of a citizen leader. Students are responsible for the care and cleanliness of their rooms and for the condition of their floor and residence hall. A damage/contingency deposit is collected from each student and serves as an incentive for responsible involvement and behavior. Longwood provides beds, dressers, desks, and closets. In order to personalize rooms, students are encouraged to contact their roommate in order to decide what each will bring to their room. Students are expected to supply lamps, bedspreads, “flame retardant” drapes, blankets, pillows, and linens. Kitchen, laundry, and vending facilities are located in most residence halls. Study lounges and recreation areas are also available. Fire safety procedures and inspections are part of residence education and are strictly enforced. Information about residence education activities, policies and procedures is available from the Office of Residential and Commuter Life and through the department’s web page. Go to www.longwood.edu/rcl to learn more about “Living well at Longwood.”

STUDENT HEALTH AND WELLNESS CENTER

Longwood University maintains health and wellness services for students needing medical and preventive health care. A Wellness Coordinator plans a variety of community wellness activities and manages the alcohol and other drug education programming. Services of consultants, hospitalization, private nurses, prescriptions, x-rays, and laboratory tests are at the expense of the students. All student health records are confidential.

Southside Community Hospital, located a few blocks from Longwood, is well equipped and has a capable staff of physicians and surgeons.

Fulltime students must have a Health Record on file in Student Health. State law requires all students to be immunized against measles, rubella, mumps, polio, diphtheria, tetanus, and meningitis. Screening for tuberculosis is also required. Failure to comply will result in a "stop code" being placed on registration. Students are encouraged to maintain a personal record of immunizations should they decide to enroll at other institutions.

Appointments with a clinician are available Monday through Friday during the academic year. Allergy injections are also given by appointment.

ACCIDENTAL SICKNESS INSURANCE

Longwood strongly recommends that all full-time students have health insurance coverage. Premiums must be paid directly to the insurance carrier by the student. Brochures are available in Student Health.

LIABILITY INSURANCE

Longwood carries liability insurance for all students engaged in observation and field experiences. Medical malpractice insurance is provided to students in the allied health programs acting within their assignments.

STUDENT UNION

Lankford Student Union is not only a building, but also an organization and a program that is an integral part of the educational and co-curricular agenda of Longwood. The Union is a central focus of the students’ experience at Longwood and serves as the "living room" of the campus. The Union, and its formal and informal programs, serves as a laboratory for students to explore social, cultural, and educational involvements; student governance; campus leadership; group participation; and student employment. It is a place where students, faculty, and staff can get to know and understand each other outside the classroom.

The Student Union is an ongoing training mechanism for students who work together with staff to plan and implement a balanced schedule of social, cultural, and educational activities. Student programmers learn transferable skills and are challenged in the area of personal development.

The Student Union is both a campus resource and a service. Campus information, quality food service, programming and meeting facilities, convenience items, and courtesies are available to the Longwood community. The Student Union includes the Commonwealth Ballroom, Meeting Rooms, Leadership Resource Center, Commuter Student Lounge, Student Government Office, Lancer Productions Office, Recreation Area (featuring four bowling lanes, pool and ping pong tables, and video games), Lancer Café (with Chic-fil-A, Bena Pizzeria, Java City, and Freshens Yogurt and Smoothies), U.S. Post Office with resident student mailboxes, Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, Leadership and New Student Programs Office, The Rotunda Office, and the Peer Helpers’ Office.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES

Longwood campus life is a highly visible combination of meaningful learning and social activities. Many opportunities exist for student involvement outside the classroom. Over 75 student organizations are active on the Longwood campus. It is through these organizations that student life is defined. Programs offered are developed by students within each group in response to individual interests.

Students are encouraged to get involved in clubs and organizations. Exploring several groups of interest before deciding which ones are appropriate for full participation is the recommended strategy. Longwood’s student organizations include citizen leader groups, social and learning associations, fraternities and sororities, academic clubs and honoraries, student governance councils, and religious organizations, among others. The Student Union office, in Lankford 201, maintains a list of registered student groups and contact information.

Lancer Productions is the student programming organization. Funded by student activity fees, this group of students plans and implements a balanced schedule of social, cultural, educational, and recreational activities for the Longwood community. Programs sponsored by Lancer Productions include films, contemporary concerts, comedy clubs, performing arts, musical performances, lectures, interactive and novelty events, cultural enrichment programs, and the annual Spring Weekend.

The Office of Student Union and Activities, in conjunction with Lancer Productions, provides a wide variety of programs encompassing different areas of student interest. These activities compliment and enhance the academic experience. The Assistant Director of the Student Union and Activities advises Lancer Productions students in the design and implementation of programs.

STUDENTS

ROLE and PARTICIPATION OF STUDENTS: INSTITUTIONAL DECISION-MAKING

At Longwood, students are encouraged to participate in decision-making, and have substantive contributions to make. Their participation will have educational value to them as well.

Students are given the opportunity to participate in the decision-making process at the highest levels through involvement in the Student Government Association. Student Government strives to

. . . achieve and maintain appropriate representation on all . . . {institution}, administrative, and faculty bodies and committees that make decisions affecting the student body of Longwood . . . (Article 1, Section 2 of the Student Government Constitution). The mission statement of SGA also provides that the Student Government Association should serve as the official voice of the student body through which student opinion may be expressed to the administration of Longwood . . . .

THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

The Student Government Association works to advance the general welfare of the student body and to promote the cultural, intellectual, and personal development of each student. This organization promotes effective self-governance, encourages individual excellence, and vigorously pursues the general will of the student body.

The Student Government Association consists of a Judiciary (Honor Board, Judicial Board, Greek Judicial Board, and Student Arbitration Board), the Executive Council, and the Student Senate. The Executive Council is the coordinating body among the different branches of the S.G.A. The Student Senate members are the President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretary, Publicity Chair, Historian, twelve Senators-at-Large, Senior Class President, Junior Class President, Sophomore Class President, Freshman Class President, Commuter Student Association Representative, Association of Black Students President, Residence Hall Association President, Multicultural Affairs Representative, Honor Board Representative, Judicial Board Representative, and a Representative from the fraternity/sorority community.

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

The challenges and opportunities of citizen leadership and the common good are often found in student clubs and organizations. Members and leaders can gain values of collaboration, commitment, common purpose, and citizenship (care).

In order to enhance and enrich these opportunities, various leadership experiences are offered to teach students the skills of team building, resource management, goal setting, program planning and implementation, decision-making, problem solving, and evaluation. A list of clubs and organizations and officers is available in the Student Union Office.

GREEK ORGANIZATIONS

There are twenty-one social fraternities and sororities available for membership. These organizations are member groups of the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC - historically Black fraternities and sororities), the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC/IFC - mainly historically White fraternities), and the National Panhellenic Conference (NPC - historically White sororities). Longwood is unique because four NPC sororities were founded on its campus over 100 years ago, hence being dubbed the "mother of sororities."

Longwood extends to students an opportunity to join these groups if they have completed at least 12 credit hours at Longwood, and have a minimum 2.2 cumulative GPA. Individual organizations may require up to a minimum GPA of 2.5 and 24 credit hours. Specific information regarding GPA and credit requirements of a particular group is available through the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life.

These organizations develop all areas of personal competence, including leadership, academic, communication skills, and service learning. Each semester, members contribute many hours to community service and philanthropic efforts.

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

The Rotunda, a student newspaper, keeps students and faculty informed of events and interests at Longwood, as observed from the student point of view, and expresses the attitude of students toward the various phases of student life.

Gyre and the Tyrant are literary magazines containing essays, poetry, prose, short stories, and art contributed by students.

MORTAR BOARD

The principal honor organization on campus, Mortar Board, was chartered in 1993 as an outgrowth of Geist and its predecessor, Alpha Kappa Gamma. Mortar Board is a senior honorary society, recognizing three outstanding qualities: leadership, scholarship, and service. Mortar Board members plan, coordinate, and implement activities for Oktoberfest weekend, and they organize at least one community service project.

HONOR and PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES

There are a number of honor and professional societies, and departmental clubs that recognize excellence in various fields.

The Longwood chapter of the National Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at Longwood in February of 1972. Founded in 1897, the purpose of the society is to emphasize scholarship and character in the thoughts of students, to foster the significant purposes for which institutions of higher learning have been founded, and to stimulate mental achievement by recognition through election to membership. Undergraduates are eligible for membership as last semester juniors or seniors. For consideration as a junior, a student must achieve a 3.75 cumulative quality point average. For consideration as a senior, a student must achieve a 3.5 cumulative quality point average. Undergraduates are eligible for membership as seniors and as last semester juniors.  For consideration as a senior, a student must be in the top ten percent of their class, and for consideration as a junior, a student must be in the top seven and a half percent of their class.

The local chapter of Alpha Lambda Delta, a national society that honors high scholastic achievement in the freshman year, was installed in the fall of 1966. To be eligible, a freshman must have a 3.5 average at the end of the first semester, or a cumulative 3.5 at the end of the freshman year. The purpose of the organization, as stated in the constitution, is ‘‘to promote intelligent living and a high standard of learning, and to encourage superior attainment among freshmen in institutions of higher learning.’’ In addition, departmental professional clubs and honor societies are available.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC COUNCIL AND PROGRAM

Longwood holds membership in Division II of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The NCAA is a national organization which provides governance and leadership for initiating and maintaining standards of excellence in intercollegiate athletic programs.

In November 2002, Longwood announced its intention to reclassify its NCAA Division II athletics program to Division I. The University will no longer compete in the Carolinas Virginia Athletics Conference as of the end of 2002-2003 year. It will compete as a Division II independent until official reclassification is completed as of September 1, 2007 when it officially becomes a Division I program.

The intercollegiate athletic program consists of eight teams for women and six teams for men.

Women’s Teams: basketball, cross country, field hockey, golf, lacrosse, soccer, softball and tennis.

Men’s Teams: baseball, basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, and tennis.

The objectives of the Athletic Department are:

1. Enhance the general student population by attracting academically and athletically-talented students;

2. Graduate student athletes at the same ratio as the general student body;

3. Insure that student-athletes benefit from the affective student development model of Longwood;

4. Compete successfully with NCAA institutions of similar stature;

5. Provide a positive window of visibility in the media for Longwood;

6. Accommodate the athletic interests of the student population in harmony with gender and minority issues through a commitment to offering a variety of intercollegiate sports;

7. Create a pride and identity for and with the citizens of the region, and

8. Strictly comply with all rules and policies of Longwood and the NCAA.

Regardless of the intensity of the competition, the athletic program must maintain the appropriate balance between athletic endeavors and academic pursuits. In so doing, the athletic programs of Longwood shall be conducted in compliance with all policies of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the educational objectives of Longwood.

The Intercollegiate Athletic Council, appointed by the President, has general oversight over athletic policy, with particular attention to compliance with NCAA regulations and equal opportunity requirements. It serves as an advisory body to the Athletic Director, and may make recommendations to the President of Longwood through the Faculty Athletics Representative, who serves as chair of the council.

 

 
Academic Calendar | General Information | College of Arts & Sciences | College of Business & Economics
College of Education & Human Services | Faculty | Catalog Search | Catalog Home | Longwood University Home