English Courses


ENGL100. Rhetoric & Research

ENGL101. Comp & Literary Analysis

ENGL165. Writing and Rhetoric

This course prepares students for the writing and research they will do throughout their university experience. Students will learn to explore, to analyze, and to inform within academic contexts using the most effective rhetorical strategies, structures, reference, and language of multiple disciplines. Students will identify the strengths and weaknesses in their written communication. 3 credits. WI.

ENGL208. Principles Secondary Engl Educ

Principles and methods of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment in the secondary English classroom with an emphasis on the VA SOLs. Required of all English majors with a secondary education concentration. Must be taken during the first semester of the sophomore year. Prerequisites or co-requisites: EDUC 245 and EDUC 260. 1 credit.

ENGL209. Intro to Literary Analysis

Sustained study of reading and writing skills necessary to the student of literature, including close reading, the ability to conduct research, and an overview of major critical approaches. Emphasis on a variety of poetic, dramatic, and fictional forms from a range of cultures and historical eras. 3 credits.

ENGL210. Forms and Genres

An introduction to the formal analysis of texts, which may include works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, film, and other genres. Students will develop skills in assessing how form and genre enable and constrain expression using relevant techniques of reading and research. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Fulfills the Foundations Student Learning Outcome in Aesthetic Expression. 3 credits. G03; FAES, WI.

ENGL215. Histories & Cultures

An introduction to the historical analysis of literary and cultural texts, which may include works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, film, and other creations. Students will develop skills in assessing texts as evidence of continuity and change in one or more contemporary or historical cultures using relevant techniques of reading and research. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Fulfills the Foundations Student Learning Outcome in Historical and Contemporary Cultures. 3 credits. G03; FHCI, WI.

ENGL220. Intro to Dramatic Writing

An intensive introduction to playwriting and screenwriting. Learning and utilizing a workshop format, students will develop skills in reading as a writer, giving and receiving constructive criticism, and developing and using an expanding knowledge and vocabulary of craft to reflect and make judgments about texts they read, their own texts and the creative writing process. 3 credits. G04; FAES, AA.

ENGL221. Intro to Writing Fiction

An intensive introduction to the writing of short fiction, specifically the short story. Learning and utilizing a workshop formal, students will develop skills in reading as a writer, giving and receiving constructive criticism, and developing and using an expanding knowledge and vocabulary of craft to reflect and make judgments about texts they read, their own texts and the creative writing process. 3 credits. G04; FAES, AA.

ENGL222. Introduction to Writing Poetry

An intensive introduction to the writing of poetry. Learning and utilizing a workshop format, students will develop skills in reading as a writer, giving and receiving constructive criticism, and developing and using an expanding knowledge and vocabulary of craft to reflect and make judgments about texts they read, their own texts and the creative writing process. 3 credits. G04; FAES, AA.

ENGL223. Intro Writing Creative NonFict

An intensive introduction to the writing of creative nonfiction, including but not limited to memoir, personal essay, travel and environmental writing, and literary journalism. Learning and utilizing a workshop format, students will develop skills in reading as a writer, giving and receiving constructive criticism, and developing and using an expanding knowledge and vocabulary of craft to reflect and make judgments about texts they read, their own texts and the creative writing process. 3 credits. G04; FAES, AA.

ENGL265. Writing & Rhetoric Citizenship

This course prepares students for the writing and speaking they will do throughout their university experience through an investigation of various aspects of citizenship. This course is specifically designed for students with an Associate's Degree earned in high school through a dual enrollment program. By permission only. 3 credits. WI.

ENGL295. Special Topics English

The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

ENGL301. Rhetorical Criticism

Fundamental principles of rhetorical study. Emphases on approaches to analyzing non-literary texts using various rhetorical theoretical approaches. Prerequisite: ENGL 150. 3 credits. WR.

ENGL302. History of Rhetoric

A history of the major figures, texts, and rhetorical movements from Gorgias to the 20th century. Prerequisite: ENGL 150. 3 credits. WR.

ENGL303. Visual Rhetoric and Document D

Examination of the theories, research, and practices of visual rhetoric and the design of documents for the workplace. Emphasis on ways in which images and other visual methods of communication influence audiences. Prerequisite: Goal 2. 3 credits. WR

ENGL305. Adv Topics Rhetoric Prof Writi

Advanced study featuring a particular aspect of rhetoric or professional and/or technical writing, such as a time period, genre, or theoretical perspective. May be repeated for credit if topic changes. Prerequisite: Goal 2. 3 credits. WR.

ENGL310. The Ecological Imagination

This course considers the work of artists and scientists who model integrative approaches to literature and science as the means of addressing civic and global issues. Over the course of the semester we will investigate how scientific data are used as part of personal storytelling. We will consider how fictional personae have been used to promote scientific ideas. We will also examine how personal experience can be a vehicle for addressing environmental issues​. Pre-requisites: Completion of the FSRC requirement and completion of the FAES requirement. PSRC, PAES, WI. 3 credits.

ENGL319. Technical Writing

A study and application of writing techniques for the dissemination of scientific and technical information. Prerequisite: ENGL 150. 3 credits. WR.

ENGL325. British Lit Medieval to Renais

Medieval and Renaissance literature (the beginnings to 1660) with an emphasis on such major works and writers as Beowulf, Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer, Malory, Wyatt, Sydney, Marlowe, Spenser, Jonson, Donne, Marvell and Milton. Prerequisite: ENGL 209 or by permission of the department chair. 3 credits.

ENGL326. Brit Lit Restoration to Romant

Restoration, Enlightenment, and Romantic literature (1660-1832) with an emphasis on such major authors as Dryden, Behn, Swift, Pope, Richardson, Fielding, Johnson, Wollstonecraft, Blake, Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, Coleridge, Byron, Percy and Mary Shelley, Keats and Austen. Prerequisite: ENGL 209 or by permission of the department chair. 3 credits.

ENGL327. Brit Lit Victorian to Contemp

Victorian, modern, and post-modern literature (1832 to the present) with an emphasis on such major authors as Dickens, Tennyson, Browning, George Eliot, Wilde, Shaw, Hardy, Conrad, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Lawrence, T.S. Eliot, Beckett, Stevie Smith, Heaney, Barnes and Rushdie. Prerequisite: ENGL 209 or by permission of the department chair.

ENGL335. Am Lit: Contact to Romanticism

The literature of contact and of the colonial, early republic, and antebellum periods, with an emphasis on major authors such as Smith, Mather, Bradstreet, Franklin, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Douglass, Whitman, and Dickinson. Prerequisite: ENGL 209 or by permission of the department chair. 3 credits.

ENGL336. Am Lit: Realism to Contemp

Realism, naturalism, modern, and postmodern literature (1865 to the present), with an emphasis on major authors such as Twain, James, Dreiser, Crane, Chopin, Chesnutt, Wharton, Eliot, Frost, Cather, Hemingway, Hughes, Faulkner, Wright, Rich, Morrison, O'Neill, Wilson, Albee, Cisneros, and Harjo. Prerequisite: ENGL 209 or by permission of the department. 3 credits.

ENGL350. Linguistics and Language Learn

An introduction to the study of language with an emphasis on language as a human system, including language acquisition, the cognitive and social significance of language, language change and variation, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, discourse analysis, historical linguistics, and psycholinguistics. 3 credits.

ENGL351. Philosophy and Literature

Literature and philosophy are both means by which people attempt to assign meaning, shape, and value to human life and experience. This course will apply philosophical methods and questions to the interpretation of specific literary texts and will explore the possibility that literary narrative also possesses its own contribution to make to philosophical reasoning. Pre-requisites: Completion of FHBS and FAES. PAES. WI. 3 credits.

ENGL356. The Art of Film I

Introduction to theory and techniques of the motion picture through screenings of classic and contemporary feature films. Prerequisites: D- or better in ENGL 150. 3 credits.

ENGL357. The Art of Film II

A study of major directors of film genres. Prerequisites: D- or better in ENGL 150. 3 credits.

ENGL358. Women and Film

A study of women directors and the history and conventions of portraying women in film. Prerequisites: ENGL 150. 3 credits.

ENGL360. Genre Studies

Study of literature in the context of a genre such as, but not limited to, the following: Humor, Mythology, Folk Literature, Detective Fiction, Science Fiction, Lyric Poetry, The Sonnet, Narrative Non-Fiction. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. 3 credits.

ENGL361. Literature of Places Spaces

Study of literature that is shaped by its setting or place of origin. Could include, but not limited to, the literature of Ireland, West Africa, the American West. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. 3 credits.

ENGL362. Literature of Diversity

Study of literature Study of a literature that has been historically marginalized or underrepresented, such as ethnic literature, queer studies, postcolonial literature, or women's literature. May be repeated for credit when the topic changes. Prerequisite: ENGL 165 or by permission of the department chair. 3 credits.

ENGL365. Shakespeare

An introductory study of Shakespeare's works. Prerequisite: ENGL 209, THEA 230. 3 credits.

ENGL372. American Masculinities

This course investigates how scholars, writers, and filmmakers have depicted the idea of “masculinity” in America and what their depictions mean for contemporary men. It will explore historical, social, and psychological models for masculinity and use those models to interpret popular and literary texts. Pre-requisites:Completion of FHCI pillar course. 3 credits, PHCI

ENGL373. Transformations of Medieval L

The medieval period continues to be misidentified both as a primitive ‘dark age’ and as an idealized utopian golden age of racial and religious homogeny. Popular culture creates an impression of the Middle Ages as violent and lawless, racist and misogynistic. This course seeks to dispel those misconceptions through integrative analysis of literary and historical works, in conjunction with modern media, popular culture, and current political issues. By focusing on the original historical context of a selection of medieval texts set against the interpretation presented to modern audiences in novels, comics, short stories and film, this course takes an in-depth look at the way in which the medieval world has been reconfigured for modern readers and viewers—new “medievalisms”—and how those interpretations are shaped by civic and global issues like race, gender, sexuality, and social justice.​ Pre-requisites: Completion of FHCI. 3 credits.

ENGL376. Culture & Story: A Cultural Ap

A workshop in writing fiction, framed through the fundamental cross-cultural understanding of Cultural Anthropology. Pre-requisites: Completion of FAES. 3 credits.

ENGL378. Law, Literature, and Differenc

This course explores how American law works in concert with custom to attempt to encode definitions of race into U.S. society. We will attempt to understand how conceptual categories like “citizen” and “the Human” are cut by race as it is crafted through court decisions, written laws, and material enforcement. Students can expect to read widely and deeply across disciplines including law, history, and literary theory in order to grapple with the problems and implications of the legal history of race. Pre-requisites: Completion of FHCI. 3 credits.

ENGL379. Representing Nonhumans

This course will focus on literary and cultural texts that use nonhuman entities and configurations to explore questions of science, ethics, morality, and identity. In specific, we will look at how writers reconfigure the human through depictions of the animal, technology and the cyborg, the superhero, and the monster/alien (or some combination of these areas). Pre-requisites: Completion of FAES. 3 credits, PAES

ENGL380. Children's Literature

A survey of poetry, prose, and other media appropriate for elementary students. Primarily for those preparing for careers in elementary education and library science. Prerequisite: ENGL 165. 3 credits.

ENGL381. Literature for Young Adults

A survey of young adult literature from 1967 to the present. Selection and evaluation of books, poetry, short stories, and other media. Instruction in and practice with response theory using written assignments and oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENGL 165. 3 credits.

ENGL382. Grammar: Theory and Practice

A study of the various aspects of English grammar for elementary, middle, and secondary level pedagogical purposes. Includes two mutually informed focuses: (1) the descriptive review of the fundamentals of English grammar and (2) the discussion of the theoretical and pedagogical issues and best practices related to the teaching of English grammar. Prerequisite: ENGL 165 or Goal 2. 3 credits.

ENGL383. Hist of Lit for Young Readers

An introduction to British and American literature for children, from its roots in the oral tradition and medieval literature through contemporary works. Prerequisite: ENGL 380. 3 credits.

ENGL384. Diversity in Lit Young Readers

This course provides opportunities for investigating children’s literature that is representative of a variety of ethnic and religious groups. We will discuss major issues of multiculturalism, the history of multicultural children’s books, stereotyping, authenticity of perspective, as well as criteria for selecting and evaluating these books. Prerequisite: ENGL 380. 3 credits.

ENGL390. Directed Study

Must be approved by the head of the department. May be repeated as 391. 1-18 credits.

ENGL391. Directed Study

Must be approved by the head of the department. 1-18 credits.

ENGL395. Special Topics

Selected topics in English. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

ENGL3XX. English Elective

ENGL400. Advanced Writing Seminar

Develops rhetorical skills needed for citizenship in a democracy. Includes interdisciplinary inquiry into and analysis of at least one significant public issue across all sections. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of General Education Goals 2 and 3; 75 credit hours or permission of the Chair of the General Education Committee. 3 credits. *Fulfills General Education Goal 13.

ENGL411. Epic

Study in the tradition and qualities of the epic as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. 3 credits. WR. SP.

ENGL412. Poetry

Study in the tradition and qualities of poetry as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more specific forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR. SP.

ENGL413. The Novel

Study in the tradition and qualities of the novel as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR. SP.

ENGL414. Short Story

Study in the tradition and qualities of the short story as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR. SP.

ENGL415. Drama

Study in the tradition and qualities of drama as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR. SP.

ENGL416. The Bible as Literature

This course will both study the Bible as a work of literature and glance at its appropriation in later literary works. Students will examine the Bible itself primarily through the lens of the principal genres of biblical literature: wisdom writings, liturgical poetry, theological history, prophecy, gospel, epistle, and apocalypse. Students will also look at how the Bible is treated in later literature as both a generally accepted source of literary authority and a contested site of interpretive debate. 3 credits. WR and SP

ENGL417. Nonfiction

Study in the tradition and qualities of nonfiction as a unique genre with emphasis on one or more forms or a period in which the genre flourishes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL421. Major Figures in Fiction

Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American writers. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL422. Major Figures in Fiction

Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American writers. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL423. Major Figures in Poetry

Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American writers. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL424. Major Figures in Poetry

Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American writers. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL425. Studies in Shakespeare

Extended study of specific themes and topics in Shakespeare's works. Topics may include, but will not be limited to: studies of a specific genre (comedy, tragedy, history), studies of Shakespeare's Roman plays or history plays, or studies in Shakespearean stage on film history. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL426. Major Figures in Drama

Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American dramatists. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL427. Major Figures in Drama

Extended study in the work of from one to three major English or American dramatists. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL431. Arthurian Literature

Comparative study of Arthurian material of various countries from the medieval through the modern periods. Prerequisites: One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL432. Women and Literature

Comparative study of the tradition of literature by and about women. Pre-requisites: One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL438. Studies in World Literature

This course engages students in the advanced study of the literature of a specific author, country, or region exclusive of England and the United States. Prerequisites: One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits. WR SP

ENGL440. Studies in Literary History

This course engages students in advanced study of a specific literary period or movement. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits.

ENGL441. Ethnic Literature

Comparative study of the literary tradition of an ethnic group such as Afro-American, Jewish, Chicano, or Native American peoples. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits.

ENGL442. Regional Literature

Comparative study of the literary tradition of a region, such as the American South, or Ireland. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits.

ENGL443. Postcolonial Literature

Study of literature written in English from countries during and after colonial contact with Britain, excluding the United States. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits.

ENGL444. Literature and Culture

Extended study of British or American literature and culture at a particular point in time or of a literary theme over time. Emphasis on the relationship of literature to its cultural context, including politics, social organization, art, and music. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in a literary period. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 3 credits.

ENGL445. Studies Children's Lit

Advanced study featuring a particular aspect of Children's Literature, such as a time period, a genre, or a theoretical perspective. Prerequisite: Completion of One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL445. Studies Children's Lit

Advanced study featuring a particular aspect of Children's Literature, such as a time period, a genre, or a theoretical perspective. Prerequisite: Completion of One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL446. Studies in Young Adult Lit

Advanced study of literature featuring a particular aspect of young adult literature, such as a time period, a genre, or a theoretical perspective. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in a literary period. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL461. Lit Criticism:Senior Sem

Study of the history and aims of literary criticism from Plato and Aristotle to the present, including oral and written criticism of literary works. Capstone course for English majors. Enrollment limited to seniors and those with permission of instructor. 3 credits. WR and SP

ENGL470. Professional Writing Skills

Intensive reading and writing workshop focused on developing professional expository prose within the student's field of endeavor. The last half of the course will be devoted to writing workshops critiquing "works" in progress of some "real world" writing projects. 3 credits.

ENGL475. Advanced Dramatic Writing

An advanced workshop in writing forms of drama. Prerequisite: ENGL 315: Introduction to Dramatic Writing with a grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

ENGL476. Advanced Fiction Writing

An advanced workshop in writing the short story. Prerequisite: ENGL 316: Writing Fiction with a grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

ENGL477. Advanced Poetry Writing

An advanced workshop in writing poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 317: Writing Poetry with a grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

ENGL478. Adv Creative Non-Fiction Writ

An advanced workshop in writing various forms of creative non-fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 318: Writing Non-Fiction with a grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

ENGL479. Writ Middle Second Classroom

A study of theories and strategies for improving writing. Includes a discussion of analyzing subject matter, determining purpose and audience, drafting, revising, editing (including using correct mechanics), and evaluating the elements of effective writing instruction at the middle and secondary levels. This course will also contain a field-based component in a classroom setting when students will examine current pedagogical practices in the teaching of writing. Prerequisites: ENGL 350 and 382. 3 credits. WR and SP.

ENGL480. The Teaching of English

Prospective English teachers will examine and demonstrate the principles of content planning, effective methods for teaching content that reflect best practices, and the alignment of curriculum and assessment. 3 credits. Offered in fall semester only. WR and SP.

ENGL482. Directed Secondary Teach

Each student is assigned to work with a qualified cooperating teacher in a selected off-campus school setting. The student teacher goes to the school setting and follows the schedule of the cooperating teacher(s) for a thirteen-week period. Prerequisites: Completion of all major and professional education coursework; minimum cumulative and major GPA of 2.50; passing scores on all tests required for English 6-12 licensure in the Commonwealth of Virginia. 12 credits. SP.

ENGL482. Directed Secondary Teach

Each student is assigned to work with a qualified cooperating teacher in a selected off-campus school setting. The student teacher goes to the school setting and follows the schedule of the cooperating teacher(s) for a thirteen-week period. Prerequisites: Completion of all major and professional education coursework; minimum cumulative and major GPA of 2.50; passing scores on all tests required for English 6-12 licensure in the Commonwealth of Virginia. 12 credits. SP.

ENGL483. Writing:Elementary Clsrm

A study of theory and practice relating to writers at emergent, early, and developing stages. Includes discussion of the complex factors involved in literacy acquisition at the elementary level, along with exploration of effective ways to address these factors through writing instruction. Also includes extensive experience with writing: processes, strategies, and evaluation. Prerequisite: ENGL 382. 3 credits. WR. SP.

ENGL483. Writing:Elementary Clsrm

A study of theory and practice relating to writers at emergent, early, and developing stages. Includes discussion of the complex factors involved in literacy acquisition at the elementary level, along with exploration of effective ways to address these factors through writing instruction. Also includes extensive experience with writing: processes, strategies, and evaluation. Prerequisite: ENGL 382. 3 credits. WR. SP.

ENGL485. Practical Issue Working Writer

An introduction to practical issues beginning writers face, including but not limited to manuscript preparation, researching journals and markets, preparation for and giving public readings, and imaginative ways to deal with rejection. Prerequisite: ENGL 315 or 316 or 317 or 318, with a grade of C or higher. 1 credit.

ENGL490. Independent Study

A directed reading and/or research program administered by qualified specialists in the department. One option is to do an extended research project in conjunction with a 300- or 400-level English course for an additional one-hour credit. The student must secure the director's approval prior to registering for the course. 1-3 credits per semester. An additional fee is required. *Fulfills General Education Goal 14.

ENGL492. Internship in English

Directed practicum in an applied setting that permits supervised experiential learning. Students perform meaningful tasks related to the discipline in professional environments, such as publishing and journalism on and off campus. The student will complete a practicum agreement established with the department chair, department adviser, and work supervisor. 1-6 credits. An additional fee is required. *Fulfills General Education Goal 14

ENGL495. Special Topics English

The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

ENGL498. Honors Research in English

Students conduct research in English under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits.

ENGL499. Honors Research in English

Students conduct research in English under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. 3 credits.