LONGWOOD UNIVERSITY ART DEPARTMENT

 

 

PAST EXHIBITIONS

 


Click exhibition titles for detailed explanations

Telling Objects: African Art for the LCVA Permanent Collection
On-Going
Miller Gallery

Pre-Columbian Art from the Mississippi Museum of Art
July 29 - November 19, 2005
Bishop Gallery

For Better or for Worse: Installation by K. Johnson Bowles
August 12 – November 19, 2005
Main Street Gallery

Longwood University Art Department Faculty Exhibition
September 9 – November 19, 2005
Sully Gallery

Holiday Train Display
December 9, 2005 – January 21, 2006
Main Street Gallery

Reflecting on Centuries of Beauty: The Rowe Collection of Art
February 19 – June 3, 2006
Bishop and Sully Galleries

Start with Art, Learn for Life. Youth Art Month
February 19 - March 31, 2006           
Lower Level

Art Department Senior Exhibition
April 10- May 13, 2006           
Lower Level

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-Columbian Art from the Mississippi Museum of Art
July 29 - November 19, 2005
Bishop Gallery

“Pre-Columbian Art from the Mississippi Museum of Art” was organized by George J. Bey III, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Sciences and Associate Professor of Anthropology, Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi, with the assistance of Robin C. Dietrick, Registrar, Mississippi Museum of Art. The following essay is quoted from the exhibition brochure.

Pre-Columbian civilizations in Peru, Mexico and Central America flourished prior to the arrival of Europeans, including Christopher Columbus. The result of this boom was the development of numerous archaeological cultures, several of which are represented in the collection of art and artifacts in this exhibition. These objects, spanning two continents and over two thousand years, are drawn from the Mississippi Museum of Art’s Permanent Collection and supplemented by  works from the private collection of Sam Olden of Yazoo City, Mississippi.

The majority of these artifacts came from elite burials and offerings, which explains why they are so marvelously preserved. The objects were meant to be taken into the afterlife or given as offerings to divine forces. Therefore, many of the objects are more than simply symbols of a complex philosophy that combined god, human and nature into one—they are the very currency of that relationship. They were the possessions of religious figures, warrior priests and divine kings. Ultimately, they were intended to be carried between the natural and supernatural worlds, helping to bridge the gap between the living and the dead.

The societies of Mesoamerica (Pre-Columbian Mexico and Central America) and Peru wove gods, humans and nature into intricate tapestries of beliefs and expressions. Religion played a central role in structuring people’s lives. Great civilizations developed, such as the Maya in Mesoamerica and the Moche in Peru, where kings believed to be descended from gods ruled over vast cities and constructed monuments rivaling those of ancient Greece or Egypt. Mythologies explained the creation of humans and nature, providing ways for individuals to worship and sustain the universe.

The subsistence of the universe was not only in the hands of gods, but also in those of their earthly representatives who ruled these civilizations. These lords were warrior-priests who carried out acts of war and sacrifice, thereby legitimizing their divine right to rule.  Their actions provided the energy and sustenance their gods required to maintain the natural world necessary for human survival.

This relationship between gods, humans and nature is represented in the art and artifacts exhibited in “Pre-Columbian Art from the Mississippi Museum of Art.” Objects in this exhibition are presented in five categories: an introduction to Pre-Columbian cultures; plants and animals; people and structures; gods and the supernatural; and abstraction and form. Through this arrangement of objects—based on subject matter rather than by time period or culture—the viewer sees similarities that emerged across cultures, as well as discerns cultural distinctions.

Plants and Animals: Plants and animals molded into clay or painted on vessels exemplify the Pre-Columbian physical environment, as well as characters and symbols of the mythological world. Ancient cultures relied on the natural world for food, clothing and medicine, as well as artistic materials. Thus, civilizations associated plants and animals with the divine and venerated this connection through myth, ritual and artistic endeavors.

People and Structures: The human figure is represented in ways that range from naturalistic to stylized, including examples in stone and clay that were carved, modeled and molded, made solid and hollow, incised and painted. Each detail provides information on daily and ritual life, as well as clues to status and gender identity. Representations of architecture and modes of transportation, such as houses and temples, reed boats and rafts, provide detailed information that would otherwise remain unknown.

Gods and the Supernatural: The religions that developed in Mesoamerica and Peru had complex ideological, ritualistic and iconographical systems. Each was filled with a pantheon of gods, spirits and forces that permeated the lives and behavior of the people. Divine lords are portrayed carrying out roles and rituals, sometimes through the subtlety of a seated pose and sometimes as an armored warrior. Gods emerge into reality through anthropomorphic and symbolic representation of their power and authority. Although not completely understood, especially in Peru, the gods were closely related to a set of beliefs that linked humans and nature to the supernatural. Warfare, sacrifice, death and rebirth were closely tied to the creation and maintenance of the universe and the processes of sustaining human existence.

Abstraction and Form: From throughout Mesoamerica and Peru comes art with abstract patterns and forms. Objects show a mastery of design and composition, ranging in style from geometric pieces from northern Mexico to almost calligraphic cartouches of the Maya. Although in some cases these designs may have been purely decorative, in others they are thought to communicate specific concepts and ideas. In other objects, one can see where a potter playfully used the spout for a head, feel the sculptural energy of the interconnected globular forms, and see the complexity of shape and organization in incised blackware. These works suggest that the potters were not simply craftsmen producing objects for domestic purposes or even ritual use. Instead, their work shows great creativity and allows for celebration of the universal power of artistic expression.

Pre-Columbian Cultures: The earliest evidence of Pre-Columbian culture extends back to the end of the Pleistocene Era (12,000-13,000 years ago). These foraging populations became increasingly sedentary after 3000 B.C., and by 2000 B.C. settled village-farming life developed. Cultures grew complex, with major monumental architecture emerging. Starting in 1200 B.C., much of the ideology and iconography that characterizes Pre-Columbian societies appeared. By A.D. 100, highly stratified states characterized by calendrical and mathematical systems, large monumental architecture, urban centers, craft specialization, large-scale warfare and hereditary ruling dynasties that claimed divine ancestry replaced the first great civilizations of Mesoamerica and Peru. A number of such indigenous states rose and fell until the arrival of the Spanish in the 16th century.

Mesoamerican cultures developed in varied environments that included mountain valleys formed by two major mountain chains that run through the region and merge in southern Mexico, the Pacific and Gulf/Caribbean coastal zones that also run the length of the region, and the lowland jungle that covers most of northern present-day Guatemala, Belize and the Yucatán Peninsula. Societies developed in these three zones, creating cultural diversity and complexity. Nonetheless, they shared many common traits, such as a complex 52- year calendar, a ceremonial ballgame and a stepped pyramid building. The most well-known Mesoamerican cultures represented in this exhibition are the Maya, as well as the Olmec and various groups that formed the northwest boundary of Mesoamerica, including the highland Teotihuacan and Zapotec states.

The Peruvian cultures in this exhibition developed in two general geographical zones: the Andes and the desert coast. Both of these zones run north to south across the region. In the Andes cultural development centered on the high mountain valleys, including the Lake Titicaca basin (located on the present-day border between Peru and Bolivia). Along the coast a large number of rivers flowed from the Andes, creating a system of narrow river valleys where coastal development took place. Among the cultures represented in this exhibition, the Moche (or Mochica)—which  flourished in the coastal river valleys of northern Peru between A.D. 100 and 700—is the most prominent. Other important Peruvian cultures represented in this exhibition include the Chavin (800-200 B.C.) of the northern Andean area; the Chimu (A.D. 1000-1470), which followed in the same region as the Moche; and the Nazca (A.D. 1-600), located on the southern Peruvian coast.

 

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For Better or for Worse: Installation by K. Johnson Bowles
August 12 – November 19, 2005
Main Street Gallery

K. Johnson Bowles, Assistant Professor of Art at Longwood University, presents her latest work. This installation combines family photographs, windows, doors, lace, tulle, artificial crows, and plastic flies into a poetically surrealistic environment. Read metaphorically these elements suggest the nature of long-term relationships and their effect on individual identity. The title works in concert with the materials used in the installation to reference the preconceptions of marriage as well as the sometimes difficult real-life challenges that couples face in their lives together.  

K. Johnson Bowles received her BFA from Boston University and MFA from Ohio University. She is also the recipient of a NEA Regional Artists Fellowship and a fellowship from the Houston Center for Photography. Her work has been exhibited throughout the country including exhibitions at the Houston Center for Photography (Houston, TX), Wood Street Gallery (Chicago, IL), Artemisia Gallery (Chicago, IL), Denise Bibro Gallery (New York, NY), The Painted Bride (Philadelphia, PA), the University of Kentucky (Lexington, KY), Meredith College (Raleigh, NC), Old Dominion University (Norfolk), Artspace (Richmond, VA), ACME Art (Columbus, OH), Women and Their Work (Austin, TX), and WomanKraft (Tucson, AZ) among others.

 

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Longwood University Art Department Faculty Exhibition
September 9 – November 19, 2005
Sully Gallery

The Art Department faculty at Longwood University present their latest works in a range of media, form, and content. Faculty members include Mark Baldridge, Marty Brief, John S.J. Burke, Anna Cox, Kerri Cushman, Randy Edmonson, Clair Black McCoy, Kelly Nelson, Christopher M. Register, Mara Scrupe, and John Williams. More information and representations of these artists’ works will be forthcoming.

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LCVA Members Collect
December 9, 2005 – January 21, 2006
Bishop and Sully Galleries

Longwood Center for the Visual Arts’ members are invited to share a work from their personal collections for a fabulously eclectic exhibition. More information regarding participation will be forthcoming.

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Holiday Train Display
December 9, 2005 – January 21, 2006
Main Street Gallery

After a year without the holiday train (due to renovations), the HO and O gauge layout is back by popular demand thanks to the generosity of model train aficionado Bob Alden. The holiday train features a lovely winter wonderland scene that delights children of all ages. The train will run on Saturdays and for special tours. 

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Reflecting on Centuries of Beauty: The Rowe Collection of Art
February 19 – June 3, 2006
Bishop and Sully Galleries

Reflection on Centuries of Beauty: The Rowe Collection of Chinese Art will survey the LCVA’s permanent collection.The LCVA’s Rowe Collection of Chinese art contains 232 works that date from 4,000 B.C. to the 20th century. Highlights from the Collection include large Neolithic period vessels, bronze vessels, Mingqi statuettes (Han Dynasty, 206 B.C.—221 A.D.), tomb figures (Tang Dynasty, 608-907), roof tiles (Ming Dynasty, 1368-1644), and vases and bowls (Qing Dynasty, 1644-1912).

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Start with Art, Learn for Life. Youth Art Month
February 19 - March 31, 2006           
Lower Level

This annual exhibition contains more than 350 works by children in kindergarten through grade 12 representing 30 schools from Amelia, Appomattox, Buckingham, Charlotte, Cumberland, Nottoway, Lunenburg, Powhatan, and Prince Edward counties

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Art Department Senior Exhibition
April 10- May 13, 2006           
Lower Level

Longwood University Art Department seniors will present their works for their final degree requirements. More information on the participants and their works is forthcoming.

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Click exhibition titles for detailed explanations

Improvisation: African American Quilts from the Collection of Michael David Whaley
April 4 – June 24, 2005
Bishop Gallery

 

Shenandoah: Views of Our National Park Photographs by Hullihen Williams Moore
April 4 – May 13, 2005
Sully Gallery

 

Start with Art, Learn for Life: Annual Area Youth Art Exhibition
April 4- June 24, 2005
Lower Level

 

Weave a Beautiful World by Prince Edward County Elementary School Students
April 4 – June 24, 2005
Main Street Gallery

 

Richard Jolley: Sculptor of Glass from 1985-Present
May 27 - July 16, 2005
Sully Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Improvisation: African American Quilts from the Collection of Michael David Whaley
April 4 – June 24, 2005
Bishop Gallery

Click to download a PDF version of the award winning exhibition catalog.

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Shenandoah: Views of Our National Park Photographs by Hullihen Williams Moore
April 4 – May 13, 2005
Sully Gallery

Shenandoah: Views of Our NationalPark, was organized by the Office of Statewide Partnerships of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, with generous support from Philip Morris USA and the Council of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. The exhibit will remain on view through Friday, May 13.

Moore has been making photographs since high school. As a student at Washington and Lee University, he worked as a stringer for the Richmond Times-Dispatch.  Later at the University of Virginia he continued to make pictures as a hobby, often traveling into the mountains to photograph. Buying his first view camera in the1970’s, Moore went on to study in Yosemite National Park with Ansel Adams.  He later studied landscape photography and fine print making with noted landscape photographers John Sexton and Philip Hyde.

His exquisite photographs convey a sense of personal and natural history.  His visual and emotional relationship with the landscape is evident in his work.  Moore returns to Shenandoah Park year after year to discover and reconsider.  He documents change, both growth and destruction.  Floods, harsh winters, barren summers, and years of plenty all impact the landscape and keep the forest in a continual cycle of transformation.  Moore captures the ongoing biography of the very particular place.

Photography critic Robert Adams observed that Moore possesses the keen eye and sense of timing necessary to record on film “the second that looks inexplicably right.”  Eileen Mott, Coordinator of Statewide Exhibitions at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, says of Moore’s work, “With patience and the ability to perceive the most compelling viewpoint or angle, the richest light, the strongest shadow, Moore captures the significance of a place in a way that makes us look beyond the particular.  He makes intelligible to us that which we already know, but have forgotten or overlooked.”

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Start with Art, Learn for Life: Annual Area Youth Art Exhibition
April 4- June 24, 2005
Lower Level

Longwood Center for the Visual Arts celebrated the talents of young area artists with the fifth annual area youth art exhibition. Start with Art, Learn for Life opened Monday, April 4, and remained on exhibition through June 24 in the LCVA’s Lower Level Gallery.

The exhibition consisted of some 370 works by students in grades preK-12, from Amelia County, Appomattox County, Buckingham County, Charlotte County, Cumberland County, Nottoway County, Powhatan County, Prince Edward County, Fuqua School, New Life Christian Academy, and several area home schools.

The exhibition opening reception was sponsored by Central Virginia Arts. Coordinated by CVA member Shirley Blackwell, the reception featured mountains of homemade cookies and other refreshments prepared by members of the community and spectacular floral arrangements by Buckingham Greenery.

Participating Teachers and Their Schools

Carol Baltimore, Powhatan High School

Mary Beth Benko, Blackstone Primary School

Dora Bounds, Fuqua Middle/Upper Schools

Wanda Cary, Nottoway Intermediate School

Loretta Cencia, Cumberland County Elementary School

Julie Coughlin, Cumberland County Middle School

Rachel Cross, Prince Edward County Middle School

Kim Dalton, Pocahontas Middle School

Jane Dougherty, Amelia County High School

Cricket Edmonson, Prince Edward County Elementary School 

Deborah Elliott, Nottoway High School

Deborah Ford, Amelia County Middle School

Vicki Fulcher, New Life Christian Academy

Carol Gillispie, Fuqua School

Penny Hackett, Prince Edward County High School 

Frank Hailey, Randolph-Henry High School

Patricia Herring, Nottoway Middle School

Katy Jones, Bacon District Elementary School, Eureka Elementary School

Ronda Lamb Jones, Dillwyn Primary School, Buckingham Primary School

Betty McKinley, Powhatan Junior High School 

Kathryn Orth, Prince Edward County High School 

Denise Penick, Fuqua Lower School

Bettye Pope, Amelia County Elementary School

Kim Powers, Buckingham County High School

Deborah Quinn, Crewe Primary School, Burkeville Elementary School

Beth Reynolds, Appomattox County Middle School

Wendy Richardson, Appomattox County High School

Betsy Skelton, home schoolers in five counties 

Cindy Southall, Gold Hill Elementary School, Dillwyn Elementary School 

Janice Stanley, Cumberland County High School

Joy Utzinger, Prince Edward County Elementary School 

Maggie Whorley, Appomattox County Elementary School

Stephanie Wirt, Powhatan High School 

 

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Weave a Beautiful World by Prince Edward County Elementary School Students
April 4 – June 24, 2005
Main Street Gallery

Between April 4 and  June 24, Prince Edward County Elementary School’s wonderfully patterned and dazzlingly colorful Main Street Window installation focused on weaving. In the process of making this display, the approximately 1050 students in Cricket Edmonson’s and Joy Utzinger’s art classes participated in many group and individual projects involving weaving and fiber-related processes. Students used large freestanding looms to weave rag rugs and wall hangings using fabric, found items, and recyclable materials. Individually, students made rectangular and circular yarn weavings, paper weavings on painted paper, and paper weavings using Kwanzaa colors. Some younger classes made ponchos and did lacing to imitate the sewing process. During Black History Month, students looked at African fabric from Ghana and Nigeria. Then they made Adinkra prints, designed dashikis, and created African kings and queens wearing Kente cloth robes. Inspired teaching produced inspired results for this year’s window display.

Mrs. Edmonson and Mrs. Utzinger wrote: “The students enjoy our tradition of creating group projects for the youth art exhibition. We would like to thank the LCVA for providing an exciting children’s exhibit each year. We also thank the parents, faculty and administration at the Prince Edward County Schools for their enthusiastic support of our visual arts program. The large looms in this year’s window were made possible by a generous donation from the Lumber Yard. Thank you, Mr. William Schneider!”

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Richard Jolley: Sculptor of Glass from 1985-Present
May 27 - July 16, 2005
Sully Gallery

This exhibition was curated by Richard Gruber, Director of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, University of New Orleans, and Stephen Wicks, Curator of the Knoxville Museum of Art. This showing at the LCVA is part of a nine-city, 2½-year national tour and contains approximately fifty-four glass objects drawn from Richard Jolley’s private collection of works made from 1985 to the present. The tour was developed and managed by Smith Kramer Fine Art Services of Kansas City, Missouri. The following is an essay by Richard Gruber.

Richard Jolley, whose career has spanned much of the history of the contemporary studio glass movement, is described in national and regional publications as one of the country’s leading glass artists. In contrast, Jolley regards himself as an artist who works in glass, not as a “glass artist.” For him, this distinction is a critical one. During the 1990s, while he explored the possibilities of media including painting, sculpture and printmaking, Jolley demonstrated that glass was only one medium appropriate for the expression of his complex aesthetic vision. In so doing, he transcended the notion of being only a “glass artist,” a convenient categorization used by writers and critics, yet one Jolley rejects.

Jolley is, in many ways, a very independent figure, one whose life and art defy simple categorizations. This is reflected in his creative approach to the use of materials and styles, as evident in this exhibition. This is also evident in his decision to work in Knoxville, away from the major urban art centers, and far removed from the dominant studio glass environment of the Northwest associated with Dale Chihuly and the Pilchuck School. Jolley works in the mountains of Tennessee, informed by Appalachian culture and history, the traditions of the Penland School, and by the evolving urban and suburban realities of the contemporary South. Working in Tennessee, he maintains a sense of balance, between the modern and the traditional, the creative and the technological.

Richard Jolley was born in Wichita, Kansas, on November 21, 1952. When he was four years old, his family moved to Oak Ridge, Tennessee, home to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where his father was employed as a research scientist. After the move to Tennessee in 1956, the artist has spent the majority of his life in the state, attending grade school there, as well as graduating from high school and college there. In 1970, he enrolled at Tusculum College, in Greeneville, Tennessee, where he entered a new program in studio glass, directed by Michael Taylor. When Taylor moved to Peabody College in Nashville, Jolley followed him, and then completed his undergraduate degree at Peabody. After graduation, he studied at the historic Penland School, in Penland, North Carolina. He retains strong ties to Penland and its programs to the present date.

Jolley entered the evolving studio glass movement during the countercultural era of the 1970s. During this period artists and craftspeople often embraced work that was reliant upon traditional hand skills, reviving interest in clay, wood, fiber, metals and glass, while bringing an updated approach to the use of each medium. Most of the leaders of this revival were educated in art schools and universities, often acquiring graduate degrees. And, like many of their peers, they commonly rejected the dominant corporate, business and social philosophies that prevailed in America during the 1950s and early 1960s.

This exhibition is divided into categories reflecting the artist’s stylistic and chronological evolution, beginning with his Vessels (1979-1985) and Monoliths (1985-1987); then his Line Drawings (1985-1990); Busts (1990-1994); Prints, Bronzes and Other Media (1992-present); Torsos (1994-1996); Totems (1996-2001); Mixed Media Constructions (1997-present); Tabula Rasa (2001-2003) and Paintings and New Projects (2002-present).

Jolley’s earliest works evolved through his expanding understanding of and experience with the materials of his craft, following the path established by Harvey Littleton, Dale Chihuly, and other American masters of the medium. Initially he worked alone in the studio, but over time he began to work with a small group of studio assistants, evolving the systems and procedures he uses to the present date.

Some of those earliest works reflect his interest in storytelling, narrative traditions and Southern subjects such as the hunting dog. Hunting dogs and other dog images can be seen in works like Geo Dogs Attacking Floating Triangles, Neo Classical Temple to the Bird Dog and Uncle Bud Watches His Dogs Work, a work inspired by a short story by noted Southern writer, Walker Percy.

In the early 1990s, following his marriage to artist Tommie Rush, who is also his creative partner in running the studio, he achieved an increasing level of maturity and confidence that became evident in the range of his art forms. As the decade advanced, he became increasingly interested in the use of diverse media, experimenting with printmaking, painting, bronze casting and a broader use of mixed media.

After working on his line drawing series (Faun and Reclining Female), he explored the possibilities of classical forms in his busts, in both glass and bronze (Rogue, Lucky and Extravagant). He also explored the possibilities of the human figure in a series of prints, paintings and other materials, as evident in Adam and Eve, Upswept, Straight Ahead, Day and Night, reflecting the influence of Matisse upon his figurative compositions.

By 1994, he began to shift to torso forms, working in opaque and solid colored glass, reflecting the figure from the more traditional bust format, as seen in works like Torso. After 1996, he explored the possibilities made available to him by stacking and combining forms, initiating his influential “Totems” series, which continued until about 2001. In a work like Universal Bond, he combined cap

-wearing figures with a dog, repeating the early dog motif in a more complex, technically sophisticated composition.

The “Totems” are products of an expanded aesthetic vision, as well as a result of his use of skilled studio assistants and a more sophisticated fabrication system and a growing understanding of the technical possibilities of glass. He also was interested in the creation of works allowing more narrative elements, expanding upon his earlier interests in the narrative traditions in art, as well as reflecting the growing acceptance of the figurative and narrative traditions in the larger American art world at this time. Sophisticated examples of this range of work include Four Seasons, reflecting his awareness of this art historical theme, as well as Perception vs. Reality, Endurance and Taking Time.

 

By the end of the 1990s, when Jolley’s national reputation was identified increasingly with his “Totems,” he decided to explore other themes and materials, and ventured into the most recent directions evident in this exhibition. Works like Solstice, Stellar, and Lunar Coexistence reflect his explorations in combining steel, copper and aluminum with glass. The use of glass globes and containers with sculptural steel is also evident in works like Meridian and Holding Thoughts

In Between Time suggests a different direction, composed like one of the stacked totems, using a mixed media composition, built upon a human torso, a silver leaf solar (or lunar) form, and topped by the profile of a crow, reflecting his earlier bird imagery. During this period he also used the crow as a symbol in a series of monographs titled Crow Suite.

In 2001 and 2002 he was immersed in a range of explorations of diverse media and materials. This developed into a new direction in painting on paper, using the human figure as subject matter, evident in works like Male Bust and Shadow. The initiation of his “Tabula Rasa” series was also significant, marking his return to working exclusively in glass, as seen in forms like Dual Nature, Edges of Light, Angelic, and Floating Blue.

Most recently, during 2003 and 2004, after the first stage of this exhibition tour was initiated in Knoxville, he began to explore new directions in painting on paper, and completed the “Tabula Rasa” series before beginning two new glass series, one based upon classical coin profiles, titled Interior/Exterior, and another devoted to floating human figural forms, titled Suspended Figures. He also designed a full opera set for the Knoxville Opera Company and turned to new projects including the creation of art for the door of an environmentally friendly refrigerator, as well as his first designs for bowling balls, manufactured for a client by the Brunswick Corporation.

For Jolley, what remains most critical is that his art evolve and move forward over a given period of time, as he stated to this author. “For myself, I feel that an artist has a continuum. There may be highs and lows, but once you hit your stride, you know it.” For him, always independent in his artistic mission, he feels that change and evolution is his ultimate responsibility as an artist. “I feel that I have an obligation to myself to explore new directions. Reducing it to 1930s terminology, I am driving the train.”

J. Richard Gruber, Ph.D., Director
The Ogden Museum of Southern Art
The University of New Orleans


1 For a more detailed consideration of these issues and the related evolution of his career see J. Richard Gruber, “Richard Jolley: A Critical Balance,” in Richard Jolley: Sculptor of Glass, ed. Ronald Defeo (Knoxville: Knoxville Museum of Art, 2002), 13-25. See also Sam Hunter and Laura Stewart, Richard Jolley (Milan: Skira Editore, 2003).

2 See Stephen C. Wicks, “Introduction,” and Robert C. Morgan, “Richard Jolley: Dream Narratives, Diversions and Anatomies,” in Richard Jolley: Sculptor of Glass, 9-11, 27-32.

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Longwood Center for the Visual Arts 129 North Main Street Farmville VA 23901 434 395 2206