PHED 351
SKILL ACQUISITION AND ANALYSIS II: EDUCATIONAL GYMNASTICS AND DANCE
PART II: EDUCATIONAL GYMNASTICS
SPRING 2004

GENERAL INFORMATION

Instructor: J. Charles Blauvelt
Office: 108 Lancer Hall
Office telephone: (804) 395-2544
Home telephone: (804) 392-9484
Email: cblauvel@longwood.lwc.edu
Office hours: MWF 9:00-9:50 AM; TR 2:00-3:00 pm
Course hours: MWF 1:00 – 2:50
Room: Lancer Gymnasium

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The purpose of this course is to provide learning experiences that will lead to the development of basic skills in educational gymnastics and dance. The course will focus on how to plan, develop and implement gymnastic movements, routines, dance steps and sequences. (3 credits)

Note: The course will be split into two distinct halves. The first half will deal exclusively with dance. That part of the course will be taught by a different instructor and the grade earned in the dance section will count for one half of the total course grade. This syllabus is only for that part of the course dealing with educational gymnastics. It will cover the second half of the semester.

TEXT

Graham, G.; Holt/Hale, S. & Parker, M. (2001). Children moving: A reflective approach to teaching physical
      education. (5th ed.) Mountain View, CA: Mayfield.

Holt/Hale, S. (2001).  On the move: Lesson plans to accompany Children Moving.  Mountain View, CA: Mayfield

COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of the course students will be able to:

1.  Perform selected basic locomotor skills using mature form.
2.  Demonstrate awareness of selected concepts of space, effort, and relationships relationships   traveling by using the mature form of  selected basic locomotor skills.
3.  Perform selected basic manipulative motor skills using mature form.
4.  Demonstrate awareness of selected concepts of space, effort, and relationships while using the mature form to perform  selected basic manipulative skills.
5.  Perform selected basic non-manipulative skills using mature form.
6.  Demonstrate awareness of selected concepts of space, effort, and relationships while using the mature form to perform selected basic non-manipulative skills.
7.  Design and perform movement patterns which demonstrate awareness of selected movement concepts and which  combine two or more basic motor skills.
8.  Design and perform gymnastics sequences that combine travelling, rolling, balancing, and weight transfer into smooth,  flowing sequences with intentional changes in direction, speed, and flow.
9.  Select, teach, and perform organized games which contribute to the achievement of the previous stated objectives.
10.Design and select activities which contribute to the achievement of skill in performing basic motor skills.
11.Design and implement lesson plans which contribute to the achievement of skill in performing basic motor skills.

CONTENT

I.     Introduction
       A.  Policy and procedures
       B.  Relationship to PHED 381
II.    Establishing an Environment for Learning
       A.  Gymnasium rules and routines
       B.   Behavioral expectations
III.   Space Awareness
IV .  Effort
V.    Relationships
VI.  Traveling
       1.  walking
       2.  running
       3.  hopping
       4.  leaping
        5.  sliding
        6.  galloping
        7.  skipping
VII.  Chasing, Fleeing, and Dodging
VIII.  Jumping and Landing
IX.    Balancing
X.     Transferring Weight and Rolling
XI.    Kicking and punting
XII.   Throwing and catching
XIII.  Volleying and dribbling
XIV.  Striking with rackets and paddles
XV.    Striking with long-handled implements
XVI.   Games
XVII.   Gymnastics

TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

MAR 4 Policy and procedures
         6  Establishing an environment for learning
         8  Movement concepts
   11-15 NO CLASS – SPRING BREAK
        18 NO CLASS
        20 Locomotor skills
        22 Locomotor skills
        27 Locomotor skills
        29 Non-manipulative skills
APR   1 Non-manipulative skills
           3 Non-manipulative skills
           5 Manipulative skills
           8 Manipulative skills
          10 Manipulative skills
          12 Games
          15 Games
          17 Gymnastics
          19 Gymnastics
          22 Gymnastics
          24 Combinations and teaching
          26 Combinations and teaching
MAY   1  WEDNESDAY  3-5 PM FINAL EXAM

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Attendance
Demonstrate mature form and competent performance on selected locomotor skills
Demonstrate mature form and competent performance on selected manipulative skills
Demonstrate mature form and competent performance on selected non-manipulative skills
Design and performance of gymnastics routine
Plan and implement three lessons
Evaluation of motor skills of peers

GRADING

20 PTS. Demonstrate mature form and competent performance on selected locomotor skills

20 PTS Demonstrate mature form and competent performance on selected manipulative skills

20 PTS Demonstrate mature form and competent performance on selected non-manipulative skills

20 PTS Design and performance of gymnastics routine

10  PTS Plan and implement three lessons

10 PTS Evaluation of motor skills of peers

GRADING SCALE

A 90 – 100
B 80 - 89
C 70 - 79
D 60 - 69
F 00 - 59

Note: The numerical grade, based on possible 100 pts. Which is achieved in this part of the class, will be divided by 2. That grade will then be added to the grade (out of 50) from the first section of the class. The sum of the two sections of the class will be the final grade and it will be evaluated according to the above scale.

ATTENDANCE POLICY

The following provisions of the Longwood attendance policy will be enforced in this class:

Students are expected to attend all classes. Instructors have the right to lower a student’s course grade, but no more than one letter grade, if the student misses 10 % of the scheduled class meeting times for unexcused absences. Instructors have the right to assign a course grade of "F" when the student has missed a total (excused and unexcused) 25% of the scheduled class meeting times.

HONOR CODE

All students are expected to adhere to the Longwood College Honor Code. Honesty is the foundation of the academic experience. This code will be taken very seriously.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Cooper, M. & Mirabile, C. (2002).  Scooter ball.  Strategies, 13(3), 37-38.

Hynes-Dusel, J. (2002).  Motor development in elementary children.  Strategies, 15(3), 30-34.

Fuchs, R.K., Cusimano, B. & Snow, C.M. (2002).  Box jumping: A bone-building exercise for elementary school children.
     JOPERD, 73(2), 2225.

Goswick, K. (2002).  Team 4-square.  Strategies, 15(3), 19-22.

Tillman, K. & Rizzo Toner, P. 1984.  You'll never guess what we did in gym today!: More new physical education games
     & activities.  West Nyack, NY: Parker.

______________________.  1983.  What are we doing in gym today?:  New games and activities for the elementary
     physical education class.  West Nyack, NY: Parker.

Wirszlya, C. (1998).  Double dutch for all.  Strategies, 11(6), 8-10.