POLITICAL SCIENCE 441
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Spring, 2006

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 Instructor: Dr. Harbour
Office: Ruffner 228
Office telephone: 395-2219
Office hours:
MWF 10:00-11:00  TR 9:30-10:30
mailto:harbourwr@longwood.edu
Home phone: 315-0352

Table of Contents
 Course Description
 Texts
 Course Objectives
 Class Schedule
 Course Requirements
 Grading
 Attendance Policy
 Honor Code
 Class Discussion
 Critical Thinking Writing Exercises
 Taking Exams
 Bibliography

Course Description:
Study of the factors conditioning international politics, with emphasis upon the foreign polices of major powers.

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Texts:
Karen Mingst & Jack Snyder.  Essential Readings in World Politics. Second Edition
John T. Rourke.  World Politics:  International Politics on the Word Stage. Tenth Edition.

Students may want to make use of Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports and Issue Briefs found online at:
http://fpc.state.gov/fpc/c4763.htm  Many of these reports are excellent reviews of foreign policy issues.

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Course Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate a capacity for critical and analytical thought about international relations

2. Demonstrate an ability to communicate their knowledge and beliefs about international politics both orally and in writing.

3. Discuss the central features of the international system

4. Identify the principal models used by political scientists in studying international relations and discuss the claims of the major schools of thought within the discipline, explaining how political scientists try to understand international relations

5. Discuss important philosophical and ethical issues associated with the challenges confronting relations among nations.

6. Identify information regarding international relations which is necessary and useful for responsible citizenship

7. Discuss how international politics have shaped and been shaped by the dynamic social forces of the past 100 years

8. Discuss elements of both continuity and change within the international political system.
 

Class Schedule:
Click HERE for the on-line Study Guide for this course.  It includes questions to help reading and reflecting upon the weekly and daily assignment as well as useful links to various web sources on the thinkers and issues being addressed in those assignments.

Week 1  Introduction to the Study of International Relations
Jan. 17-20
     Read:  Rourke Chpts. 1, 2, 3; Mingst & Snyder, Chpts. 1 (Articles by Walt, Gaddis); 2 (Articles by Kennan, Gaddis) 
     Special Topics:                                                                                                                            
W:   Introduction to the study of international relations
How do political scientists try to understand international relations?  What are the different levels of analysis employed by students of international relations? What are the main forces and who are the main actors shaping international relations?                                                                                                     
F: What were the essential dynamics of the cold war? Does the apparent triumph of market place economics and western democracy in the world mean we will live in a more peaceful word?                                                        
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 1
Relying in part on the articles by Kennan and Gaddis in your readings, write a three page essay in which you explain how the United States perceived the Soviet Union at the onset of the cold war and then explain some of the essential dynamics of the international political system during the cold war.

Week 2  Power Politics and Political Realism
Jan. 23-27
     Read:  Mingst & Snyder, Chpts. 1 (Article by Thucydides), 3 (Articles by Morgenthau, Mearsheimer), 4 (Articles by Morgentahau, Jervis) 
    Special Topics:
    M:  How does political realism understand the role of power in international relations?
    W:  How does neorealism (or structural realism) understand international relations?
     F:  Do stability and peace require a balance of power or a clear imbalance of power?
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 2
Write a three page essay in which you explain how political realism attempts to understand international relations.  What are the essential descriptive and normative claims of political realism?  Explain the strengths and weaknesses of this theory.

Week 3  Liberal and Radical Challenges to Power Politics and Political Realism
Jan. 30 - February 3
    Read:  Mingst & Snyder, Chpts, 1(Article by Kant),2 (Article by Wilson), 3(Articles by Doyle, Frank, Tickner, Finnemore), 4(Aticles by Bull, Wallerstein), 6(Article by Enloe)
    Special Topics:
    M:  How does liberalism understand the causes of war and peace among nations?
          How does liberalism challenge power politics and realist theories?
     W:  How do Marxist and other radical models try to explain the international system?
      F:  How do feminist and postmodernist paradigms challenge both realism and liberalism when it comes
           to trying to understand international relations?
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 3
Write a three page essay in which you explain how liberalism attempts to understand international relations.  What are the essential descriptive and normative claims of liberalism as it is applied to international relations?  Explain the strengths and weaknesses of this theory.

Week 4  States and Individuals
Feb. 6-10
     Read:  Mingst & Snyder, Chpts. 5(Articles by Krasner, Slaughter, Rotberg), 6(Articles by Hermann and Hagan, Jervis); Rourke, Chpt. 3, 6
     Special  Topics:
     M:  What is the role of the state in world politics?
     W:  What role do individuals play in world politics?
      F:   NOTE: Your first test will be given on Friday, Feb.10. It will count for 1/6 of your semester grade.

Week 5  Power, Conflict, and the Role of Diplomacy
Feb. 13-17
      Read:  Rourke, Chpts. 8
     Special Topics:
     M:  What are the elements of power for nation-states?
     W:  What is the role of diplomacy in relations between nations?
      F:   What are the most important elements of successful diplomacy?
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 4
Write a three page essay in which you explain the most important elements of successful diplomacy.

Week 6  Nationalism and Democracy
Feb. 20-24
     Read:  Mingst & Snyder, Chpt. 8 - Article by Posen; Rourke, Chpt. 4
     Special Topics:
     M:   What roles have nationalism and ethnic identity played in conflicts between states?
     W:   How are democratization and nationalism sometimes a dangerous mixture?
      F:   What are the positive and negative legacies of modern nationalism?
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 5
Write a three page essay on the following question.  How has nationalism been both a positive and negative force in modern international relations?  What factors influence which direction nationalism takes?  Be sure to cite appropriate examples in developing your analysis.

Week 7  War, Military Forces, Doctrines, Arms Races, Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, and Terrorism
Feb. 27 - March 3
     Read:  Rourke, Chpt. 10, 11; Mingst & Snyder, Chpt. 8 - Articles by Clausewitz, Schelling, Jervis, Sagan and Waltz, Mueller, Cronin, Pape 
     Special Topics:
     M:  What are the causes of war and terrorism?
     W:  What are the most significant military forces and doctrines in the international system today?
     F:  What are the principal proliferation issues facing the world today?
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 6
Write a three page essay on how you think the United States should address issues of terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

Week 8  Rational Choice Theory and Game Theory
March 6-10
     Read:  Mingst & Snyder, Chpt. 8 - Article by Jervis
          Online assignments and handouts on rational choice theory and game theory
Read the online Britannica article on game theory at: http://search.eb.com/bol/topic?tmap_id=79239000&tmap_typ=ai
Read the online Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry at: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/game-theory/
Take a look at the following web site that provides a good introduction to game theory:
          http://www.econ.rochester.edu/eco108/ch17/micro17/index.htm
          Also go to the Britannica website, click under History & Humanities, search under game theory <http://search.britannica.com/search?query=game+theory> and study material under the following sites: <http://www.britannica.com/bcom/eb/article/5/0,5716,117275+1+109420,00.html?query=game%20theory>
<http://search.britannica.com/frm_redir.jsp?query=game+theory&redir=http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/game-theory/>
<http://www.britannica.com/bcom/magazine/article/print/0,5746,213696,00.html>
     Special Topics:
     M:  How can rational choice theory and game theory be used to understand international politics?
     W:  What does game theory suggest as rational choices in different decision making situations in
            international politics?
      F:  NOTE:  Your second test will be given on Friday, March 10.  It will count for 1/6 of your semester grade.

SPRING BREAK   MARCH 11-19

Week 9  International Economics: The Role of International Trade, the Flow of Money, and Multinational Corporations in International Relations
March 20-24
     Read:  Rourke, Chpts. 12, 13, 14; Mingst & Snyder, Chpt. 9 - Articles by Gilpin, Krasner, Scott, Einhorn, Stiglitz
     Special Topics:
     M:  How has international trade evolved over the past four centuries?  How does trade shape the world today?
     W:  How do the international monetary system and multinational corporations shape the world today?
      F:  To what extent do economic conditions, desires, policies, and forces lead to international conflict?
           To what extent do economic conditions, desires, policies, and forces lead to a more stable and peaceful world?
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 7
Write a three page essay on the following issue. Explain the arguments of those who claim that much of the conflict in the world today can be understood in terms of North v. South.

Week 10  Transnationalism and Globalization
March 27-31
     Read:  Rourke, Chpt. 5, ; Mingst & Snyder, Chpt. 10 - Articles by Held, Friedman, Chpt. 7 Article by Keck and Sikkink
     Special Topics:
     M:  What are the principal transnational forces at work today?
     W:  What issues are raised by globalization?
      F:  What are some of the principal health issues facing the international system?
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 8
Write a three page essay on the following question.  Do economic development and globalization lead to a more humane and stable world or to greater injustices and conflict?  Be explicit in the criteria you employ in your analysis and offer solid supporting evidence to support your claims.

Week 11  International Organizations, International Law, and Global Governance
April 3-7
     Read:  Rourke, Chpts. 7, 9; Mingst & Snyder Chpt. 7 - Articles by Glennon & Responses, Kissinger, Roth, Ikenberry, Mearsheimer, Chpt. 9 - Articles by Einhorn, Stiglitz
     Special Topics:
     M:  How important are international organizations to the international system?
     W:  What are the bases for international law?  What role does it play in the international system?
            What are the scope and limitations on international law?
      F:  What are the principal issues involving global governance in today's world?
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 9
Write a three page essay on the strengths and weaknesses of the United Nations. Be sure to use appropriate examples in developing this essay.  Generalizations without supporting evidence are of little value. Be clear on the criteria you are employing in evaluating the effectiveness of the UN.

Week 12  Religious Fundamentalism and Terrorism
April 10-14
Read:  Rourke, Chpt. Chpt. 5 pp. 148-157, Chpt. 10 pp. 317-325; Mingst & Snyder, Chpt. 5 - Articles by Huntington, Said, Fuller
      Special Topics:
      M:  What is the role of religious fundamentalism in world politics today?
      W:  What is the role of terrorism in world politics today?    
      F:   NOTE: You will have your third test on Friday, April 14.  It will count for 1/6 of your semester grade.

Week 13  Regional Issues in the International System Today
April 17-21 
Read:  Draw on readings of the entire semester and follow news on all of these issues during the entire semester
           Also:  Read the article on Emerging China by Peter Katel found in the November 11, 2005 issue of the online Congressional Quarterly Researcher.  Go to http://library.cqpress.com/ and then go to the link on the article in the CQ Researcher. 
     Special Topics:
     M:  What issues are at stake with the American policy in Iraq? 
     W:  What role will China play in world politics in the future?
     F:  What are the main challenges confronting a resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?
Critical Thinking Writing Exercise No. 10
Write a three page essay in which you evaluate the policies of the Bush administration regarding Iraq.     

Week 14  Human Rights and Environmental Issues
April 24-28
Read:  Rourke, Chpts. 15, 16; Mingst & Snyder, Chpt. 7 - Articles by Keck & Sikkink, Power, Chpt. 8 - Article by Doyle, Chpt. 10 - Article by Sen
     Special Topics:
     M:  How are human rights an issue for the world today?
     W:  How are environmental issues sometimes a source of conflict between nation states?
            To what extent may environmental issues be an increasing source of instability in the international system? 
      F:  Review   

April 28   Last day of Classes
April 29   Reading Day
May 1-5  Final Exam Period
                Your final exam will count for 1/6 of your semester grade.  It will be a comprehensive essay examination.
                Your final exam will be given at 3:00 - 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 2.
May 13   Commencement

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Course Requirements:
Three Tests
Total scores on ten critical thinking writing exercise
Contribution to class discussion
Final comprehensive exam

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Grading:
Your grade will be based upon three tests given during the course of the semester, your total score on ten three page critical thinking writing exercises, your contribution to class discussion, and a final exam.  Each of these will count for 1/6 of your grade.  Each of the exams will involve an essay format.  The final examination will be comprehensive.

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Attendance Policy:
The attendance policy for this course is the University policy found in the University Catalog and Student Handbook.

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Honor Code:
Students are expected to live by the Longwood University Honor Code. All work done for the class must be pledged. Your instructor will not tolerate any form of cheating.

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Class Discussion:
Students are expected to make contributions to class discussion.  Your grade in this regard will be based upon participation during the semester.

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Ten Critical Thinking Writing Exercises: You will write ten 3 page essays during the course of the semester. The topics for these short essays are listed in the course outline.  Each paper is worth 10 points and is due at the beginning of class on the Friday of each week for which a paper is due. Late papers will lose points.
 The papers will follow the Turabian format.
 A shorter version of that style manual can be found on the History style manual at the following web address: <http://www.longwood.edu/history/HDPTSTS2.htm>
There will be more help on developing these papers found in the Study Guide for the course. Click HERE for the online Study Guide for this course.

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Taking Exams:
Exams must be taken on time.  You are expected to provide proof for any legitimate reason (illness, participation in a University-sponsored activity, or recognizable emergency) you have for missing an exam.  Having another test on the dame day or having problems with the person you are dating are not valid reasons for missing a test.

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Bibliography:
Required Reading:
Karen Mingst & Jack Snyder.  Essential Readings in World Politics.
John T. Rourke & Mark A. Boyer.  World Politics:  International Politics on the Word Stage, Brief 4th
John T. Rourke.  Editor.  Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Issues in World Politics.  Eleventh  Edition.
 

Suggested Reading or Reference:

Students may make use of the excellent and very extensive bibliographies provided in the texts.

Other Materials:

John Baylis & Steve Smith.  The Globalization of World Politics.  Third Edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.
W. Raymond Duncan, Barbara Jancar-Webster, Bob Switky.  World Politcs in the 21st Century.  New York: Longman, 2001.
Karen Mingst.  Essentials of  International Relations.  Third Edition.  New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2004. 
Michael G. Roskin & Nicholas O. Berry. IR The New World of International Relations.  Upper Saddle River, New Jersey:
  Prentice Hall, 2002.
John T. Rourke, Mark A. Boyer.  World Politics.  Fourth Edition.  New York:  McGraw-Hill/Dushkin, 2002.
Jill Steans & Lloyd Pettiford.  International Relations:  Perspectives and Thems. New York:  Longman, 2001.
Raymond C. Taras, Rajat Ganguly.  Understanding Ethnic Conflict. Second Edition.  New York:  Longman, 2002.

Special Readings on War, Terrorism, and Homeland Security:

William M. Evan.  War & Peace in an Age of Terrorism: A Reader.  New York: Pearson/Longman, 2006.
James A. Fagan.  When Terrorism Strikes Home: Defending the United States.  New York: Pearson/Longman, 2006.
Bribitte L. Nacos.  Terrorism and Counterterrorism: Understanding Threats and Responses in the Post - 9/11 World.  New York;            Pearson/Longman, 2006.
Dennis Okerstrom.  Peace, War, and Terrorism.  New York: Pearson/Longman, 2006.

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