Psychology Courses


PSYC101. Introduction to Psychology

A focus on the scientific theories, methods, and evidence used in psychology to understand natural mental processes and behavior. Emphasis is on using the scientific method of inquiry to enhance one's understanding of the validity of various sources of information about the characteristics of humans and other animals, and develop the skills required to engage in credible, ethical scientific investigations relevant to understanding human and animal life. the application of social science methods and results to contemporary social, cultural, and ethical concerns will also be emphasized. 3 credits. G08; FSRC; WI.

PSYC151. Introduction to Biopsychology

An introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and an overview of how it produces everyday behavior. Topics will include how psychological processes are encoded in brain activity and how these biopsychological functions are altered by disease and drugs. Prerequisites: Psychology majors, Psychology minors, Neuroscience minors, or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC233. Psyc Research Methods

Examination of the major problems of psychology and experimental procedures available for their investigation. Lecture and one double-lab period. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better). 4 credits. WR and SP. Open only to psychology majors and minors.

PSYC234. Quantitative Methods

Introduction to the principles and techniques of experimental design and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: PSYC 233 (with grade of "C-" or better), or co-requisite with PSYC 233. 3 credits. Open only to Psychology majors and minors.

PSYC275. Psychology of Social Media

An exploration of the ways people use and are affected by social media and other digital technology, and the manner in which social media and i-technology use relates to individual development and sociocultural change. Special consideration will be given to social media and i-technology use and human development, social relationships, cognition, achievement, positive and negative effects on psychological well-being, and personal safety. 3 credits.

PSYC295. Special Topics Psychology

Selected topics in Psychology. The topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

PSYC300. Sensation and Perception

A study of transduction, organization, and interpretation of information. Topics include sensory physiology, theories of perception, theories of attention, subjective influences on perception, and consciousness. Prerequisites: PSYC 233 and 234 (with grades of "C-" or better). Lecture and one double-lab period. 4 credits.

PSYC301. Psychobiology of Stress

An in-depth study of the physiological and psychological aspects of stress. Students will discover how the psychological experience can impact physiology, and how psychological responses can alter behavior. Specific emphasis will be placed on understanding the nervous system and endocrine system and their roles in the stress response. Prerequisites: PSYC 151 or NEUR 105 (grade of "C-" or better). 3 credits.

PSYC311. Study Abroad

Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses on psychology. 1-18 credits.

PSYC312. Studies Abroad

Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses on psychology. 1-18 credits.

PSYC313. Hormones & Behavior

This course examines how hormones can produce changes in behavior, and how behavioral interactions can alter hormones. Topics may include sexual differentiation, sex differences in behavior, reproductive and parental behavior, dominance, aggression, and hormonal and behavioral homeostatic regulations. Prerequisites: PSYC 151 or NEUR 105 or BIOL 288 (with grades of "C-" or better). 3 credits.

PSYC315. Comparative Animal Behavior

This course will introduce students to various approaches for studying animals and their behavior, emphasizing ethology, comparative psychology, and evolutionary perspectives. Introductory topics will focus on the science and methods of studying animal behavior. During the course, we will explore a wide range of organisms and behavioral phenomena. Topics may include sensory systems, communication, learning, foraging behavior, antipredator behavior, territoriality, mating behavior, parental care, and social behavior. 3 lecture hours. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or NEUR 105 (with a C- or better). 3 credits.

PSYC321. Behavioral Neuroscience

Study of the biological substrates of behavior. An in-depth examination of the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system as it relates to specific behaviors, such as sensation, coordination of the motor system, and cognition. In the laboratory component of this course, students will be introduced to techniques relevant to the study of Behavioral Neuroscience. Prerequisites: PSYC 151 or NEUR 105; PSYC 233, PSYC 234 (grades of C- or better in all). 3 lecture and one 2-hour lab periods. 4 credits.

PSYC322. Cognitive Psychology

Examination of theories and research dealing with verbal learning, concept learning, short-term and long-term memory stores, cognitive encoding and search strategies, and transfer. Prerequisites: PSYC 233 and 234 (with grades of "C-" or better). Lecture and one double-lab period. 4 credits.

PSYC324. Learning

Examination of the classic and contemporary literature in animal learning and motivation. Prerequisites: PSYC 233 and 234 (with grades of "C-" or better). Lecture and one double-lab period. 4 credits.

PSYC330. Life-Span Development

Principles and research covering the life-span development of human abilities and behavior. Topics include developmental research methodologies, variables influencing development, basic processes in development; and physical, motor, perceptual, cognitive, linguistic, motivational, emotional, social, and personality development. Prerequisites PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC330. Life-Span Development

Principles and research covering the life-span development of human abilities and behavior. Topics include developmental research methodologies, variables influencing development, basic processes in development; and physical, motor, perceptual, cognitive, linguistic, motivational, emotional, social, and personality development. Prerequisites PSYC 101 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC331. Social Psychology

An examination of some of the many interesting ways in which individual behavior and thought is influenced by social situations. A major theme that will emerge is that social situations are often more powerful than personality in influencing behavior. Topics to be covered include: aggression, altruism, conformity, interpersonal attraction, persuasion, and prejudice. Prerequisites PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC333. Individ Diffs and Social Behav

Examination of the conceptual frameworks and research methodologies used to predict behavior. This lab course will draw from social and personality psychology to explore the interaction of situations and individual differences in the context of self-regulation, happiness, romantic relationship functioning, and other topics. Prerequisites: PSYC 233 and 234 (with grade of C- or better). Lecture and one double lab period. 4 credits.

PSYC340. Health Psychology

Examination of how psychological, biological, and social factors influence health and illness. Course will address how the use psychological science to promote physical, mental, and social well-being; cope with stress and illness; and improve health care systems. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 (with grade of "C-" or better). 3 credits.

PSYC345. Psychological Tests Measuremen

A survey of methods, techniques, and instruments for measuring individual differences in behavior, personality interests and intellectual ability. This lab course will give special attention to the psychometric properties required for sound psychological measurement as well as to how psychological tests are developed. Prerequisites: PSYC 233 and 234 (with grades of C- or better). 3 lecture and one 2-hour lab period. 4 credits.

PSYC350. Psychology of Sex and Gender

An examination of the differences between the male and female experience from the psychologist's point of view. The course will include factors which have affected the male and female experience, current research on actual and perceived gender differences, and how social changes have contributed to changing roles. Prerequisites PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC356. Abnormal Psychology

This course offers an examination of abnormal behavior and mental disorders with an emphasis on symptoms, classification, and causes. Some treatment issues will be explored. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 (with grade of “C-” or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits

PSYC357. Psychopathology of Child/Adole

Diagnostic classifications and models of abnormal childhood behavior. Attention will be given to physical, learned and social bases of abnormal behavior. Prerequisites PSYC 356 (with a grade of "C-" or better). 3 credits.

PSYC360. Consumer Psychology

Study of the psychological relationship between individuals who receive services and purchase goods and those organizations that provide such services and goods. Prerequisites PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC366. Ind Organizational Psychology

Study of the theories and techniques of psychology in relation to the topics of employee selection, performance appraisal, work motivation, job satisfaction, leadership, working conditions, and job-related health and stress. Prerequisites PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC371. Infant and Child Development

An examination of the biological, cognitive, social, emotional, and behavioral changes that take place during prenatal development, infancy, and childhood including genetic influences, transformations in attachment, autonomy, family relations, sibling relations, peer relations, moral thinking and behavior, intelligence, language, and achievement. Brief examination of childhood psychopathology. Prerequisites PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC373. Adolescent & Adult Dvlpmnt

An examination of the biological, cognitive, social, emotional, and behavioral changes that take place during adolescence and adulthood, including transformations in identity, intimacy, autonomy, sexuality, achievement, and attachment. Brief examination of adolescent and adult psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC380. Community Psychology

An examination of the interaction of individuals and their social contexts, and its effects on the health and well-being of both the individual and the community. Exploration of how change can be effected to address social problems. Examples of community psychology interventions in various settings will be explored. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 (with grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC384. Cross-Cultural Psychology

An in-depth investigation of the relationships between cultural and human development, and the thoughts, emotions and behaviors of individuals in different cultures. Focuses on human traits, development, and interactions from a multicultural and multiethnic perspective. Prerequisites PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC390. Directed or Independent Study

Must be approved by the head of the department. May be repeated as 391. 1-18 credits.

PSYC391. Directed Study

PSYC3XX. Psychology Elective

PSYC400. Human Factors Psychology

This course examines the relationship between human behavior and technology, with a focus on understanding how knowledge of psychology can be applied to make the human-technology interaction more efficient and effective. Prerequisites PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC401. Psychology Warfare Terrorism

An examination of alternative warfare (e.g., insurgency, guerilla, urban warfare, and terrorism) from a social psychological perspective. Topics to be covered include: motivations, recruitment, tactics, media use, prevention programs and counter efforts. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC410. Psych Interviewing

This course will provide an overview of the interview process in different settings. Basic professional listening, communicating, and interviewing skills will be taught and practiced. Strategies for obtaining accurate information and for avoiding bias in the interview will also be reviewed. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 (with grade of "C-" or better), Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC423. Theories of Personality

An examination of the major theories of personality including analytical, cognitive and behavioral theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC430. Psychology and the Law

Psychology applied to various legal topics such as criminal behavior, characteristics of lawyers and police, civil commitments, insanity plea, competence, the legal process and ethical issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 (with a grade of "C-" or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC452. Psychopharmacology

This course serves as an overview of the research and current thought on the topics of treating and counseling people addicted to drugs. In addition, the course will review the use and misuse of prescription medications. We will be reviewing the history of various drugs, the neuropharmacological actions, the affects on health, and the psychopharmacological actions. Prerequisites PSYC 151 or NEUR 105 (grade of C- or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC453. Psychology of Language

This course surveys the psychological foundations of language. Topics will range from basic issues such as the structure of language, language development, language comprehension, and language production, to special issues such as the relationship between language and thought, the relationship between language and the brain, bilingualism, and learning a second language. Junior or Senior Standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PSYC457. History & Systems

The development of psychology from ancient to modern times. Prerequisite: Open only to Junior and Senior psychology majors and minors. 3 credits. WR.

PSYC460. Advanced General Psychology

A survey course for senior psychology majors. It covers the most contemporary concepts, principles, theories, methodologies, issues and insights in the field of psychology. Prerequisite: Open only to Senior psychology majors. 3 credits.

PSYC461. Seminar in Psychology

A seminar for the senior psychology major, designed to integrate knowledge of specific fields into a comprehensive view of psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 233 and 234 (with grades of "C-" or better). Open only to Senior psychology majors. 3 credits.

PSYC490. Independent Research

A directed research project administered by qualified specialists in the department. By permission of instructor. 1-6 credits. *Fulfills General Education Goal 14.

PSYC492. Internship in Psychology

Directed practicum in applied setting, or research mentorship that permits supervised experiential learning. Students learn through performance in meaningful tasks in a variety of environments. By permission of instructor. 1-15 credits (hours 1-3 graded; hours 4-15 pass/fail) *Fulfills General Education Goal 14.

PSYC495. Special Topics Psychology

Selected topics in Psychology. The topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-6 credits.

PSYC498. Honors Research in Psychology

Students conduct research in psychology under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits. *Fulfills General Education Goal 14.

NEUR105. Introduction to Neuroscience

This course will be a broad introduction to neuroscience. Important general principles of nervous system structure and function will be emphasized, as well as broad scientific proficiency as a foundation for further interdisciplinary study of the neural basis of behavior. Topics may include comparative vertebrate and invertebrate neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, behavioral neurobiology, neuropharmacology, and neural basis of cognition. 3 lecture and one 2-hour lab periods. 4 credits. FSRC, SI.

NEUR210. Decision Making

This course will explore the behavioral and biological elements affecting the ways humans make decisions. Common myths about decision-making will serve as vehicles for exploring the drives that influence human choice. Students will examine the interdisciplinary nature of decision-making, considering contributions from not only neuroscience, but also economics, management, psychology, and possibly other fields. Understanding rational decision processes will be discussed in the context of choices facing modern citizen leaders. FHBS, SI. 3 credits.

NEUR321. Behavioral Neuroscience

Study of the biological substrates of behavior. An in-depth examination of the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system as it relates to specific behaviors, such as sensation, coordination of the motor system, and cognition. In the laboratory component of this course, students will be introduced to techniques relevant to the study of Behavioral Neuroscience. Prerequisites: PSYC 151 or NEUR 105 (grade of C- or better); Open only to Neuroscience Studies minors. 3 lecture and one 2-hour lab periods. 3 credits.

NEUR390. Direct or Independnt Stdy-NEUR

By permission of instructor and must be approved by the Director of the NeuroStudies minor. May be repeated. 1- 18 credits.

NEUR401. Cultural Neuroscience

An examination of the influence of neuroscience on past and/or present culture. Topics may vary by semester, and may include pop culture, literature, music, history, and others. This course is a series of topical lectures, presentations and discussions, with an emphasis on interconnecting sub-disciplines and understanding the interdisciplinary nature of the field. Prerequisite: PSYC/NEUR 321 (with a grade of C- or better) or permission of instructor. 1 credit.

NEUR402. Modern Neuroscicence

An analysis of current trends and innovations in neuroscience. Topics vary by semester, and may include technology initiatives, research techniques, industry applications, and others. This course is a series of topical lectures presentations and discussions, with an emphasis on interconnecting sub-disciplines and understanding the interdisciplinary nature of the field. Prerequisite: PSYC/NEUR 321 (with a grade of C- or better) or permission of instructor. 1 credit.

NEUR403. Health Neuroscience

An introduction to health-related neuroscience. Topics may vary by semester, and may include clinical neuroscience, neuroendocrinology, psychoneuroimmunology, and others. This course is a series of topical lectures presentations and discussions, with an emphasis on interconnecting sub-disciplines and understanding the interdisciplinary nature of the field. Prerequisite: PSYC/NEUR 321 (with a grade of C- or better) or permission of instructor. 1 credit

NEUR405. Inter Neuroscience Application

This course emphasizes the interconnecting sub-disciplines and the interdisciplinary nature of the field of neuroscience. Themes will include cultural topics such as music, health-related neuroscience, and current trends and innovations in neuroscience. Prerequisite: PSYC/NEUR 321 (with grade of “C-“ or better) or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

NEUR490. Independent Research in NEUR

A directed reading or experimental research project. May be repeated. By permission of instructor and must be approved by the Director of the NeuroStudies minor. 1-18 credits.

NEUR492. Internship in Neuroscience

NEUR 492. Internship in Neuroscience. A semester-long, on-the-job experience designed to apply the principles of neuroscience. By permission of instructor and must be approved by the director of the Neuro Studies minor. 1-15 credits (hours 1-3 graded; hours 4-15 pass/fail). *Fulfills General Education Goal 14.

NEUR495. Special Topics

Specialized courses on a variety of topics that may be offered periodically. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-6 credits.

NEUR498. Honors Resrch in Neuroscience

Students conduct research in neuroscience under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. Must be approved by the director of the NeuroStudies minor. 3 credits.